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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 16:27 
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julieanne1811 wrote:

I have never, ever successfully translated American cup measurements into either Imperial or metric. I used to have a wonderful American cookie book, but not a single recipe could i make work. So sad. All those wonderful pictures of cookies and I could cook nary a one ...

Why bother to translate? If you look around you should easily be able to find a measuring jug with both metric, imperial and cups in it - I have two, both cheap plastic ones, and I wasn't even looking for one, I just acquired them by chance.

I also have a set of cup measures, rather like giant measuring spoons......so with an American recipe I just use those or the jug, works fine.

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 16:54 
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Whoops, sorry about that (forgot about the need for "translation").

Saltines are soda crackers. The kind you get with soup (perhaps a North American thing). Umm...thin, crispy, and salty.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltine_cracker

1 cup of butter is a 1/2 pound (2 sticks, if you buy your butter in quarters).

According to Joy of Cooking, 2 cups of brown sugar is about 400g (of course, light versus dark would make a difference). It really doesn't have to be that exact though.

2 cups of chocolate chips is about 12oz (again, a little more/less is fine).

Skor bits are bits (about the size of a small chocolate chip) that are made from the inside of a Skor bar. If you don't have Skor bars, they are just chocolate covered toffee. So, Skor bits are crunchy bits of toffee. I'm sure that there is a British equivilant of Skor, I just cannot think of one at the moment.

Lovely mix of grams, pounds and ounces there!


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 17:02 
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Spoot wrote:

Skor bits are bits (about the size of a small chocolate chip) that are made from the inside of a Skor bar. If you don't have Skor bars, they are just chocolate covered toffee. So, Skor bits are crunchy bits of toffee. I'm sure that there is a British equivilant of Skor, I just cannot think of one at the moment.


Perhaps like a Daim/Dime Bar?

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 18:08 
Yes, Daim was what occurred to me, too. But I find these a bit too sweet so would probably leave them off.

Thank you for the translations, Spoot! I will get (at some point) some proper cup measures, though. Using the translations doesn't work for me.


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 18:28 
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Spoot wrote:
Saltines are soda crackers. The kind you get with soup (perhaps a North American thing). Umm...thin, crispy, and salty.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltine_cracker


The picture looks exactly like a kind of absolutely delicious cracker that I found in China this year. I was charmed by the idea of crackers with salt sprinkled on top as I've never seen it in the UK. I gather from your recipe that the saltiness is an important aspect of the crackers. I wonder whether sprinkling sea salt over them before adding the toffee would work?

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 22:11 
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ChubbyMonkey wrote:
I'm fairly certain that you can get them (or something very similar but possibly less salty) only I cannot think of the name for the life of me. Like lightly flavoured crackers?

Tuc? Ritz? Both of which according to wiki have more shortening ie fat than Saltines. But I guess they might make a substitute?

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 22:39 
cestina wrote:
ChubbyMonkey wrote:
I'm fairly certain that you can get them (or something very similar but possibly less salty) only I cannot think of the name for the life of me. Like lightly flavoured crackers?

Tuc? Ritz? Both of which according to wiki have more shortening ie fat than Saltines. But I guess they might make a substitute?


No ... they are too oily. Saltines are much lighter in texture - airy rather than the lightness coming from the fat content. That's why they're really good for morning sickness!


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 23:16 
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I'd say Saltines are closer to a cream crackers than anything else, though they are certainly a good deal flakier than those. But I think they would probably work for Spoot's recipe.


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011, 23:31 
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cestina wrote:
ChubbyMonkey wrote:
I'm fairly certain that you can get them (or something very similar but possibly less salty) only I cannot think of the name for the life of me. Like lightly flavoured crackers?

Tuc? Ritz? Both of which according to wiki have more shortening ie fat than Saltines. But I guess they might make a substitute?


They might, but I'm not sure. Ritz are considerably thicker and butterier than Saltines.

Plus, they're round - making the filling of the cookie sheet a little difficult!

In answer to another question - I've only used salted top crackers, but they do make unsalted Saltines as well and they do in a pinch. I just like the salty versus sweet combo.

Funny how crackers can be so different between here and there.

Tell you what - I'll mail a package of the toffee to the next Gather!


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 16 Nov 2011, 09:00 
Elder in Ontario wrote:
I'd say Saltines are closer to a cream crackers than anything else, though they are certainly a good deal flakier than those. But I think they would probably work for Spoot's recipe.


Yes ... but they are much harder and less salty. Not that I'm picky about these things of course ... :roll:


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 16 Nov 2011, 12:04 
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I assumed they were the same as Saladas, although they may be a purely Australian thing. I will happily send over a few boxes in exchange for proper Fruit Pastilles. :D

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 16 Nov 2011, 20:23 
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ChubbyMonkey wrote:
No, neither of those! This is frustrating, I can see them sat in the cupboard at home, and they look exactly the same as the picture on Wiki, but I cannot for the life of me remember the name. The only similar thing which I found while trawling was these.

That link just brings up the Sainsburys website for me Ariel.... :?

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 16 Nov 2011, 21:41 
And me ... I was a little bit excited at first, but then my excitement was crushed :( !


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 17 Nov 2011, 20:06 
ChubbyMonkey wrote:
Ah - I'm sorry! I guess my link isn't as magical as it seems. Try Google instead!


They look a bit more dry, like cream crackers?


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 19 Nov 2011, 00:33 
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Autumn Plum Crunch Cake

Ingredients
2 eggs, plus 1 egg yolk
140g / 5oz butter, softened
140g / 5oz golden caster sugar
140g / 5oz self raising flour
grated zest and juice of 1 orange
200g / 8oz plums, stoned, half roughly chopped into pieces and half sliced into wedges

FOR THE TOPPING
1.5 tbsp fresh lemon juice
140g / 5oz golden caster sugar
25g / 1oz rough sugar pieces or sugar cubes, roughly crushed

1. Preheat oven to 160C / gas 3 / fan 140C (that's what the recipe says, but I usually do this at 180C). Butter and line the base of a 1kg / 2lb loaf tin.
2. Lightly beat the eggs and egg yolk with a pinch of salt.
3. Beat the butter and suar in a bowl until light and fluffy. Pour the eggs in a little at a time, beating well after each addition.
4. Fold in the flour with the orange zest and two tablespoons of the juice, then fold in the roughly chopped plums.
5. Spoon into the prepared tin and scatter the plum wedges over. Bake for 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted comes out clean. (I find it takes more like an hour and 20 minutes, but my oven's useless.)
6. Cool for 10 minutes, then turn out on a wire rack.
7. Mix the remaining orange juice with the lemon juice and caster sugar. Spoon over the cooling cake and sprinkle with the crushed sugar pieces. Cool until set.

This recipe comes from the BBC '101 Cakes and Bakes' book.


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 20 Nov 2011, 23:15 
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Christstollen
This quantity makes two stollen about 36cm long. Or one enormous one....

1kg mixed fruit (make sure you get a mix which includes candied peel)
250gram almonds (I usually use 3x100gram packets which seems to work fine)
1 lemon
2 glasses rum (about 200ml)
1 kg plain flour
5-6sachets instant quick acting yeast
175 gram caster sugar
250ml milk
750gram unsalted butter
Icing sugar

The night before you plan to bake:
1) Peel almonds by soaking in boiling water and shucking off peel whilst still very hot. Cut into strips or chop into currant sized bits. Or just buy ready peeled. Or ready peeled and chopped! But not ground.....(I have a theory they taste better if you do the whole tedious task from scratch)

2) Wash lemon and grate rind onto fruit and almonds which are by now in a large bowl. Squeeze out the juice and pour it and the rum over the fruit. Mix well, cover and leave overnight to soak, mixing on and off. There should be just a tiny residue of liquid moving around at the bottom of the bowl beneath the fruit. Add bit more rum if necessary.

Then next day:
3) Sieve the flour into a large bowl and add the sachets of yeast. Add the sugar and then flake 500 grams of the butter onto the flour and then mix in till all the butter is well mixed with the flour and yeast. At this point it is a bit like a dry crumble mix.

4) Add the lukewarm milk and mix all together. Knead mixture until it comes off bottom of the bowl. Don’t add all the milk at once, you don’t want it too wet and might not need it all.

5) Cover and leave in a warm place for 15mins

6) Mix in the fruit and nut mix until evenly divided

7) Cover and leave for 30mins in a warm place

8) Roll out a thick dough or, more usually, divide mix and roll out two lots. Make it about three quarters of a centimetre thick and a long oval shape. With a long rolling pin make a depression down the length of the dough in the centre and then fold one side onto the depression and then the other side over it. Mould slightly so that you have a long loaf shape about 4-6cm high in centre.

9) Place on greased and flour sprinkled baking tray

10) Wall in with band of foil

11) Cover and leave 15mins in warm place

12) Put in pre-warmed oven 210C, middle shelf for 20mins, covering with foil if danger of raisins burning. Turn down oven to 175/180C for further 50-60mins. Test with skewer which should come out clean when ready.

13) Melt last 250gram of butter and paint all over the stollen and then sieve icing sugar over all the melted butter and leave to soak in. Repeat twice more at 15mins intervals
.
14) When cool wrap in foil and keep in cool place. Can be made several weeks before Christmas.

15) Takes most of the day to do!!!!!

16) Enjoy :D
(and don't ask me why the number 8 has appeared as some weird smiley face :?)

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 09:33 
Oh, how wonderful!!! I will make this!


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 12:02 
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julieanne1811 wrote:
Oh, how wonderful!!! I will make this!

You are very welcome to come and make mine Julieanne! I've been making the same recipe for forty years - it originally came from the German women's magazine "Brigitte" and two friends and I all make the recipe and we all do the final baking bit slightly differently and still get the same tasty results.....

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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 13:42 
I'll have to get some rum. It's using things like that that gives recipes authentic flavours, isn't it? Like putting some Kirsch onto a chocolate cake. Makes it taste so unbritish, but people can't quite work out why.


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes
PostPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 17:30 
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For those who are Saltine-less, I happened upon this recipe today. Looks like you can adapt my recipe to use Matzah crackers.

http://bakedbree.com/salted-toffee-matzah


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