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 Post subject: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 15 Feb 2018, 19:43 
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https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/ ... SApp_Other

My granddaughter sent me the link to this lovely piece citing all sorts of favourite childrens' books (though not GO, as it happens) but sure to revive memories in many of us. I've also posted the link in the What We're Reading Thread in Recommendations, but thought more people might see it here. Do read the comments as well, if you can access them - they are almost equally as fascinating as the article itself.


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 15 Feb 2018, 20:07 
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Thanks ... I had been wondering whether to get Lucy Mangan's book; this has persuaded me that I should.

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 15 Feb 2018, 20:59 
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I have just put it on the list of birthday presents for my daughter :)

But how unfortunate that Patricia Craig has written a book with an identical title!

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 16 Feb 2018, 18:44 
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Wasn't the writer lucky?

I'm a natural bookworm, but my parents did everything they could to squash that tendency.

'What are you doing? Why don't you do something useful? This room needs vacuuming.'

I think that's why my degree is in English Literature, though I had to learn to be discriminating because before, I'd read anything I could get my hands on.

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 16 Feb 2018, 20:56 
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cestina wrote:
I have just put it on the list of birthday presents for my daughter :)

But how unfortunate that Patricia Craig has written a book with an identical title!


Pat Craig got there first, so pity Lucy chose same title, and given the subject matter it would be somewhat surprising if Lucy hasn't read Pat's book.


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2018, 00:38 
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Jennie wrote:
Wasn't the writer lucky?

I'm a natural bookworm, but my parents did everything they could to squash that tendency.

'What are you doing? Why don't you do something useful? This room needs vacuuming.'

I think that's why my degree is in English Literature, though I had to learn to be discriminating because before, I'd read anything I could get my hands on.


((((Jennie)))) I was always known as a kid as the one with her nose in a book - my family never tried to stop me though - am horrified.

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 18 Feb 2018, 16:31 
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I, too, was always being castigated by Mum for having my head stuck in a book - even when we had visitors. There were no books in the house, as my parents simply couldn't afford them, and I suspect Mum really couldn't understand the lure of books, as she grew up on a farm in Ireland and was expected to help with the work when home from school. I never even saw her with a magazine in her hand, never mind a book. Yet, funnily enough, she was the one who made sure I could read before I went to school, for which I am everlastingly grateful. She valued education as a way out of poverty.

Dad was the one who fed my appetite, introducing me to the library, and I never looked back. Even poor SLOC gets fed up sometimes, when he can't get my attention. I'm in far too deep with the characters to hear real life. He does now read a lot himself, feeling perhaps that, if you can't beat 'em, join 'em! He has been known to wail that the house is sinking... I wonder why!

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 18 Feb 2018, 16:44 
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Clearly I was very blessed with my parents. There were books everywhere and both of them had at least one on the go all the time. As far back as I remember I was given books as presents and fairly early on I resented any present that wasn't actually a book!

My father signed me up to the library as soon as I could read and I was also given a subscription to the Children's Newspaper. Anyone else remember it? I will certainly have had this copy :). I was allowed two comics a week as well - Girl and School Friend. I was clearly a very spoilt little girl!

One of the saddest things I heard in W.H.Smith not so long ago was a mother saying fiercely to her child, who was looking longingly at some books, "Oh leave those books alone. You don't need them, you have got a book at home". And from the tone it was pretty clear that it was just one book at home.... :(

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 18 Feb 2018, 17:42 
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I always had my nose in a book, but my mum was apparently just the same when she was a little girl, so my mum and dad never had a problem with it. In the infants classes - or Key Stage 1 or whatever it's called these days! - we had "reading or drawing" sessions when either it was playtime or dinnertime and too wet to go out, or else the teachers were just giving us a bit of downtime, and it was a standing joke that I always chose reading and never drawing, but no-one said anything bad about it.

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 18 Feb 2018, 22:00 
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I was kind of in between - my parents made sure the house was full of books, but at the same time I was "doing nothing" if I was reading them, and "very antisocial"! But I always had at least 2 books on the go, one upstairs and one downstairs. I think they were happy on car journeys, since I always brought a book and was quiet. (On long car journeys I used to lie down and sleep for a while - today's kids can't do that, as they have to stay in booster seats, so I do wonder how they manage long journeys.)


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 18 Feb 2018, 22:40 
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Lamenting the amount of work
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whitequeen wrote:
(On long car journeys I used to lie down and sleep for a while - today's kids can't do that, as they have to stay in booster seats, so I do wonder how they manage long journeys.)

The booster seats don't prevent them falling asleep; they just loll around in very strange positions, fast asleep.....

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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 18 Feb 2018, 23:03 
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cestina wrote:
whitequeen wrote:
(On long car journeys I used to lie down and sleep for a while - today's kids can't do that, as they have to stay in booster seats, so I do wonder how they manage long journeys.)

The booster seats don't prevent them falling asleep; they just loll around in very strange positions, fast asleep.....


I feel like it might have prevented me, as I can't sleep sitting up, but maybe I could if I was used to having to do it from that age.


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 19 Feb 2018, 10:17 
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I was quite slow to learn to read, but once I did there was no stopping me. Fortunately I lived in a house full of books with parents who were happy for me to read all the time.


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 19 Feb 2018, 17:24 
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It was part of my mother's martyrdom - she was always complaining that she was exhausted because she had to do everything herself. This wasn't true. She just wanted an excuse to sit and watch TV all evening.

I well remember long mornings spent polishing the dining room furniture - eight chairs, two carvers, large table and enormous sideboard. And I had to use beeswax polish which took hours to shine up.

Then Eileen the Martyr would complain that I hadn't helped her to do the washing, but I always replied that if she didn't push me to one side, then elbow me in the stomach, I'd be quite happy to the washing, but as I done all the polishing, I'd been busy, not lying in bed all morning.

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Carpe diem, carpe noctem, carpe pecuniam et exe, celerrime.
A certain edge when she spoke of Mrs Maynard, certainly, but, after all, not everyone could love Joey.
'Life,' said Marvin, 'don't talk to me about life!'


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 19 Feb 2018, 18:27 
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End of term...again
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cestina wrote:
Clearly I was very blessed with my parents. There were books everywhere and both of them had at least one on the go all the time. As far back as I remember I was given books as presents and fairly early on I resented any present that wasn't actually a book!

My father signed me up to the library as soon as I could read and I was also given a subscription to the Children's Newspaper. Anyone else remember it? I will certainly have had this copy :). I was allowed two comics a week as well - Girl and School Friend. I was clearly a very spoilt little girl! (


I, too, had parents who read avidly, and I grew up in a house full of books. I remember the Children's Newspaper, and both Girl and School Friend, though I don't think I had both of those at the same time. I was also famed for always 'having my nose in a book', though regularly chastised for doing so when I should have 'been out enjoying the fresh air.' So I took my book outside, although, living the heart of the South Yorkshire coal mining area, I'm by no means sure that the air was all that fresh!!


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 Post subject: Re: Article in today's Guardian
PostPosted: 20 Feb 2018, 05:15 
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My parents encouraged us to read (and set a good example by reading books themselves). My mother taught all of us to read by the age of 3 or 4. I think the idea was that we would all lie down in the afternoon, and if we didn't want a nap we could read quietly.

We were all members of public libraries and visited them regularly - as well as swapping library books with each other if we had run out of reading material.

It was bit of a problem when we went to school, because we were already excellent readers and the teachers didn't really know what to do with us.


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