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The Beast from the East
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Author:  Alison H [ 04 Mar 2018, 09:13 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Someone made the very good point that a lot of the problems we have now are because people and goods/services travel a lot further than they used to do. In the days when people worked closer to home, it was a lot easier to get to work, on foot on necessary. That would include teachers, so it would be less likely that schools would have to close - and school closures mean that more people can't go to work because they can't arrange childcare and such short notice. Supermarkets get deliveries on a regional or national basis, whereas old-style small local shops got their stuff locally.

I'm not being a dinosaur and saying that we should all go back to working across the street and buying our groceries at the corner shop :D - I don't know what I'd do without our local 24 hour Tesco! - but I thought it was a very good point about how we seem to cope less well now than people did in the 1940s and 1950s.

Author:  Noreen [ 04 Mar 2018, 10:22 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Alison H wrote:
I'm not being a dinosaur and saying that we should all go back to working across the street and buying our groceries at the corner shop :D - I don't know what I'd do without our local 24 hour Tesco! - but I thought it was a very good point about how we seem to cope less well now than people did in the 1940s and 1950s.
We've also got much higher expectations - while bread and milk are the only things that I've heard of being in short supply this time (and that only in some places), most people are accustomed to buy what they want at virtually any time of the year, which is another thing that can put a strain on the delivery system and the shops. We had a jointly-provided meal with friends yesterday, and it included fresh asparagus, blueberries and apricots, none of which would have been possible at this time of year in the 1950s and even probably 60s.

Author:  exile [ 04 Mar 2018, 11:24 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

I work in a supermarket. We've had no milk delivery since Wednesday so sold out completely yesterday. Bread has got through OK but deliveries from our own depots have been limited.

Author:  Caroline [ 04 Mar 2018, 11:26 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Stores also operate on a just in time stocking basis, so they don’t have massive stocks of items lurking behind the scenes waiting to be put out on the shelves, rather, they rely on regular deliveries and complex supply chains to provide their stock. If those deliveries can’t get through for only a few days, then - empty shelves!

Author:  cestina [ 04 Mar 2018, 11:39 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

It's not just food expectations that have changed dramatically over the past 60 years or so. I remember my Swiss sister-in-law describing her family's journey to school in the winter, the older ones on skis, the little ones trekking along the snowy road, for several kilometres each way. It was just what you did.

In the same way, and much more recently, my Czech friend walked daily through the snow to her job at the orphanage deep in the woods, some 8 kilometres from her home. Nothing special, just standard procedure as far as the villagers were concerned.

Author:  abbeybufo [ 04 Mar 2018, 12:22 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

The other thing about the 1963 big freeze, I was just thinking the other day, is that it actually started on Boxing Day 1962...so the first few days of chaos were lost in the doldrums of between Christmas and New Year - not that that was a Bank Hol then, but schools were on hol - so by the time everyone was going back to school and work they had begun to sort things out, and the buses and trains were running OK. I caught my bus into school each day that spring term, and there was snow on the side of the roads for most of it.

Author:  Lesley [ 04 Mar 2018, 14:09 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

My village, Allhallows, was cut off for two days due to drifts blocking the roads until a tractor with snow plough attachment could clear it. Can't say that I saw any signs of breakdown in civilisation because of it. Most people used the time to catch up on box sets and sleep late - myself included! Now most of snow has gone.

Author:  MaryR [ 04 Mar 2018, 16:20 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Alison H wrote:
Someone made the very good point that a lot of the problems we have now are because people and goods/services travel a lot further than they used to do. In the days when people worked closer to home, it was a lot easier to get to work, on foot on necessary. That would include teachers, so it would be less likely that schools would have to close...

Being a Catholic - so not many schools nearby in Nottingham! - I had to travel by bus over eight miles to school from the age of five (1951) till I was 18, and there was never a time when either of my schools closed down - even in 1963.

Author:  Annied [ 04 Mar 2018, 23:47 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Thankfully we've had a thaw here all day, so most of the snow is now gone. I have no idea what state my local shops are in as I haven't set foot outside since last Tuesday!

A friend and I are holding our first bookbinding class this coming Wednesday and I was a little concerned that no one would be able to get to it, so I can understand Fio's friend's consternation.

Author:  ivohenry [ 05 Mar 2018, 00:18 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Ours has all gone now - just 3 days of it, but enough!

Author:  Audrey25 [ 05 Mar 2018, 02:43 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

We have had very little snow (though we had some today) but I was shocked at how bare the shelves were in our M & S on Friday. I live in the north of Scotland though and the delivery vans obviously could not get through. It was the same with Tescos.

We have a couple of bakers within a 15 minute walk from our house who make all their own products. Husband went to one quite early yesterday and they had no bread; only rolls. Maybe a massive amount of bread had been bought but I suppose the shop could have run out of flour or some of the other stuff needed to make bread.

That is a local shop though running out of their own products.

My daughter's primary school was nearer our house than my primary school was from my house but my primary head teacher lived in the schoolhouse and other staff lived close at hand. Some of my daughter's teachers lived miles away.

On the other hand, at one point in the 1930s my mother and her sister lived so far from any school that for some months a teacher went to them.

Author:  Terrygo [ 05 Mar 2018, 09:17 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

It has been pretty bad up here in Cumbria,towns and villages blocked in, roads closed, schools closed,massive snowdrifts, the works.
However it has also shown just how good people can be, we've had farmers, already struggling to look after their livestock, digging out villages, we've had doctors and nurses walking to work, we've had people with 4X4's offering lifts to essential workers, people braving snowdrifts to get supplies to others, and loads more.
In a world where we often here more of the bad than good it is good and heartwarming to know that their are still many caring people.

Author:  Alison H [ 05 Mar 2018, 10:17 ]
Post subject:  Re: The Beast from the East

Someone posted on the BBC Facebook page that they can't understand why people were stockpiling bread and milk: if you're going to be stuck in the house, surely what you need is wine and chocolate. That did make me laugh :lol: .

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