Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Sharing the Hanes :: Community .:|:. The Rose Garden
It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 10:57



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 24 Oct 2018, 18:48 
Offline
Cooking Disaster!
Cooking Disaster!

Joined: 29 May 2009, 18:01
Posts: 309
Location: North west Germany
fraujackson wrote:
cestina wrote:
My daughter's just reminded me that we use dingsbums - German so pronounced dinksboomps - a lot in our family. I suspect that won't surface very often...


It's going to come up at least once more ! :wink:


As another person who uses two languages you (whitequeen) may be able to work out what my answer was. Some of my vocabulary was learned when I was UK-based but the newer stuff I've learned in German so when it comes to specialist words I really have to dig deep to find the word in the "opposite" language. I'm a good CS girl, aren't I?


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 25 Oct 2018, 17:29 
Offline
End of term hi-jinks
End of term hi-jinks
User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2013, 14:14
Posts: 374
Location: England & Oberaudorf
cestina wrote:
My daughter's just reminded me that we use dingsbums - German so pronounced dinksboomps - a lot in our family. I suspect that won't surface very often...


That's one of my favourite words when I'm in Germany! I tend not to use it in the UK though, unlike a certain 2 syllable expletive that I can pack some real venom into!

(I've also done the survey, hope I'm not too late.)


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 25 Oct 2018, 21:41 
Offline
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2010, 20:24
Posts: 451
I've just been going through all the answers - some of them are great!
As expected, we here use 'yoke' and nobody else really does.
Quite a lot of "thing", "thingy" and "thingo" - love that! Seems to be an Australian habit.
I'd never heard "dooverlackey" before but I have at least 3 variant spellings of it!
Tomorrow, the writing starts...


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 25 Oct 2018, 21:44 
Offline
Going to investigate
Going to investigate

Joined: 29 Dec 2004, 17:16
Posts: 1346
Location: Ontario, Canada
Good luck with that - hope it will go well.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 26 Oct 2018, 00:32 
Offline
Being told to stand on your own two feet
Being told to stand on your own two feet
User avatar

Joined: 17 Oct 2004, 02:39
Posts: 151
Location: Connecticut, USA
Done. What's your hypothesis?


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 26 Oct 2018, 20:24 
Offline
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2010, 20:24
Posts: 451
That we'll have a few regional variations, but mainly will use the same words or variations on the same words, because we still need to understand that the other person has temporarily forgotten the word they need. But in much more academic terms.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 26 Oct 2018, 20:53 
Offline
Swept off by Matey to pack
Swept off by Matey to pack
User avatar

Joined: 03 Sep 2009, 20:25
Posts: 1109
Location: Somewhere between realms
I used to know someone who used doover - spelt right? And it used to make me giggle.

_________________
Wishes the land of Merlin and magic was real


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 27 Oct 2018, 02:14 
Offline
Arranging your timetable with Miss Dene
User avatar

Joined: 01 Oct 2016, 05:46
Posts: 106
Location: Australia
It's interesting to see the diversity of words that rarely make it into print. I asked on an international forum some years ago what the end of the bread is called - and got some interesting responses (I call it the noggy or noggie - never seen it spelled).

I assume that the 'name for the end of the bread' would be passed down from the primary caregiver (usually the mother) to children.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 28 Oct 2018, 22:46 
Offline
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2010, 20:24
Posts: 451
I have made a table (it takes up 2 pages... I need to find a way to shrink it down!) and written 600 words. So far to go... I despair!
I have discovered that "doover" comes from Australia during WWII and "oojamaflip" from a 1969 advertisement, and that Americans prefer to swear than to use a placeholder.
Hopefully I can spend a bit of time with it tomorrow, since it's a bank holiday and I have nothing else to do.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 04:28 
Offline
Sitting on the arm of a chair
Sitting on the arm of a chair

Joined: 20 Jan 2004, 00:49
Posts: 1927
Location: midwestern US
Ahem. Either you know an odd set of Americans, or the ones I know are all careful of my virgin ears. (This is quite possible.)

thingamabob, whatchamacallit, whatsit, dingus, gizmo, thingywhat, thingy, thing, "that there..."

_________________
Castor oil: Triacylglycerol from Ricinus communis containing hydroxy-fatty acids.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 19:23 
Offline
Learning to play Lacrosse
Learning to play Lacrosse
User avatar

Joined: 09 Apr 2004, 14:18
Posts: 466
Location: Colchester
[quote="whitequeen"]I have made a table (it takes up 2 pages... I need to find a way to shrink it down!) and written 600 words. So far to go... I despair!
I have discovered that "doover" comes from Australia during WWII and "oojamaflip" from a 1969 advertisement, and that Americans prefer to swear than to use a placeholder.
Hopefully I can spend a bit of time with it tomorrow, since it's a bank holiday and I have nothing else to do.[
My parents were using oojamaflip in the 50s. There is also wimwam for a gooses bridle.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 20:07 
Offline
Sub-prefect!
Sub-prefect!
User avatar

Joined: 06 Nov 2007, 17:50
Posts: 3003
Location: in a world of her own
whitequeen wrote:
I have made a table (it takes up 2 pages... I need to find a way to shrink it down!) and written 600 words. So far to go... I despair!
I have discovered that "doover" comes from Australia during WWII and "oojamaflip" from a 1969 advertisement, and that Americans prefer to swear than to use a placeholder.
Hopefully I can spend a bit of time with it tomorrow, since it's a bank holiday and I have nothing else to do.


I'm sure oojamaflip has been around longer than 1969 - I'm certain I can remember one of my uncles using it in the 1950s

_________________
to be nobody but yourself - in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else - means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.
e.e.cummings
http://stitchwords.blogspot.co.uk


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 20:30 
Offline
Having a say in the Sale theme
Having a say in the Sale theme
User avatar

Joined: 19 Jan 2004, 21:07
Posts: 3534
Location: Cambridgeshire
whim-wham for a lame duck - a Nottinghamshire phrase.

_________________
Carpe diem, carpe noctem, carpe pecuniam et exe, celerrime.
A certain edge when she spoke of Mrs Maynard, certainly, but, after all, not everyone could love Joey.
'Life,' said Marvin, 'don't talk to me about life!'


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 21:09 
Offline
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2010, 20:24
Posts: 451
That's interesting to know, but then I suppose the advertisement didn't pull it out of the air either.
I never heard whim-wham, but my dad used to say Mr. Wimwom for someone whose name he couldn't remember.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 21:22 
Offline
Castor Oil!
Castor Oil!

Joined: 29 Dec 2009, 15:11
Posts: 544
My gran used to call anyone who was fussy Mr. Fanackapan.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 21:37 
Offline
Going to investigate
Going to investigate

Joined: 29 Dec 2004, 17:16
Posts: 1346
Location: Ontario, Canada
lizco wrote:
My gran used to call anyone who was fussy Mr. Fanackapan.


I think my family used 'Fanny Fanackapan' for a fusspot- either sex! No idea where it came from, though.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 22:20 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7972
Location: Manchester
According to Google - I knew the word from somewhere, but couldn't think where, and it was annoying me! - it's from a song by Gracie Fields, although it's possible that she may have got the word from an existing expression. It sounds like one of wonderful Georgian expressions that come up in Grandiloquent Word of the Day.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Linguistic Diversity
PostPosted: 29 Oct 2018, 22:33 
Offline
Giving a Junior an order mark
Giving a Junior an order mark
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 3307
Location: West London Alps
Elder in Ontario wrote:
lizco wrote:
My gran used to call anyone who was fussy Mr. Fanackapan.


I think my family used 'Fanny Fanackapan' for a fusspot- either sex! No idea where it came from, though.


Probably gender-adapted from the song sung by Gracie Fields, 'Fred Fannakapan' - though Fred in the song was a rather gormless mother's boy rather than being fussy, and referring to someone as 'Fred Fannakapan' may even pre-date the song.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Board index .:|:. Sharing the Hanes :: Community .:|:. The Rose Garden
It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 10:57

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group