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 Post subject: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 25 Jan 2012, 23:37 
So I'm not sure if this is the correct place to post this (if not, Mods, please move), but I've been reading this excellent book and it resonates rather nicely with the CS in general.

It was published in 1908, so if we say about 20 years before the first CS book, and although it's (obviously!) about Germany and not Austria, I can see some blending in the way Elinor writes about 'peasants' or 'knitting', for example. It's a factual book, not fiction.

My first bit of interest is about knitting: In Three Go, Anna is shown chaperoning the trips et al to a little pond in which to paddle, and Mary-Lou looks through the hedge to see Anna walking along, knitting. In Germany, knitting was something that was done all the time and in all places, even at concerts or the theatre, although Mrs Sidgwick (the author) notes that this practice was dying out by 1908. I wonder if Elinor saw Austrian women walking along knitting, when she was there?

Mrs Sidgwick has an interesting view of 'peasants', and objectifies them, much as Elinor often does. They are seen as somewhat exotic, not quite human, as in:
Quote:
I think it is absurd, though, to say that German peasants dance well. They enjoy the exercise immensely, but are heavy and loutish in their movements, and they flounder in a grotesque way with their hands oneach other's shoulders.


So my guess is that both Elinor and Mrs S are simply writing in the way of the time, talking about The Other as if they're not fully human. It's a style often seen in anthropology of the time, too.

There are chapters on food, children, education, housewives ... and they seem to shine a light on things that Elinor wrote about, so I'll carry on readidng and will post as I find things that might be of interest.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 26 Jan 2012, 13:28 
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Thanks for this tip. I've just downloaded the book from Project Gutenberg and started reading. Although I have a vague feeling it is somewhere on my shelves as well.

Fascinating.

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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 26 Jan 2012, 15:09 
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Is the title Home Life in Germany?


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 26 Jan 2012, 19:50 
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fraujackson wrote:
Is the title Home Life in Germany?

Yes, by Mrs Alfred Sidgwick. Think there is another with the same title, different author.

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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 26 Jan 2012, 22:45 
She also tells about how little girls routinely curtsey to adults.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 27 Jan 2012, 14:42 
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cestina wrote:
fraujackson wrote:
Is the title Home Life in Germany?

Yes, by Mrs Alfred Sidgwick. Think there is another with the same title, different author.



Thank you. I shall acquaint myself with Mrs. A.S. shortly.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 27 Jan 2012, 15:44 
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fraujackson wrote:
cestina wrote:
fraujackson wrote:
Is the title Home Life in Germany?

Yes, by Mrs Alfred Sidgwick. Think there is another with the same title, different author.



Thank you. I shall acquaint myself with Mrs. A.S. shortly.

This should help you on your way :)

I discovered this morning that the book actually on my shelves as opposed to in my Kindl (how my phone insists on spelling it :? )is London Mixture and nothing to do with Germany at all....

I see she was very prolific!

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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 27 Jan 2012, 17:22 
It's very interesting about girls' education, too. Helps to put the CS into a bit of a historical perspective.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 21 Mar 2012, 19:46 
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I might have to think about reading that.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 21 Mar 2012, 21:15 
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I'll have to download that and read it as well - sounds interesting! It will also be interesting to see how it corresponds with modern-day home life in Germany (just like seeing how the description of CS corresponds with modern day schools).


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 21 Mar 2012, 21:22 
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Genie wrote:
I'll have to download that and read it as well - sounds interesting! It will also be interesting to see how it corresponds with modern-day home life in Germany (just like seeing how the description of CS corresponds with modern day schools).


I recognised quite a lot of it - not so much from present-day Germany but certainly from Germany in 1959 when I lived there for a year, and even from 1966-68 when we were there for 2.5 years....

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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2012, 06:54 
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cestina wrote:
Genie wrote:
I'll have to download that and read it as well - sounds interesting! It will also be interesting to see how it corresponds with modern-day home life in Germany (just like seeing how the description of CS corresponds with modern day schools).


I recognised quite a lot of it - not so much from present-day Germany but certainly from Germany in 1959 when I lived there for a year, and even from 1966-68 when we were there for 2.5 years....


My family was there just before you, Cestina, 1964-1966ish.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2012, 14:47 
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Liz K wrote:
cestina wrote:
Genie wrote:
I'll have to download that and read it as well - sounds interesting! It will also be interesting to see how it corresponds with modern-day home life in Germany (just like seeing how the description of CS corresponds with modern day schools).


I recognised quite a lot of it - not so much from present-day Germany but certainly from Germany in 1959 when I lived there for a year, and even from 1966-68 when we were there for 2.5 years....


My family was there just before you, Cestina, 1964-1966ish.


I was there on exchange in the mid-80s, and again in the mid-90s. It was a very exciting time, and I think there were a lot more changes in home life with the ending of the Cold War, and spread of communication technologies.


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 Post subject: Re: Home Life in Germany
PostPosted: 26 Jul 2012, 11:56 
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julieanne1811 wrote:
My first bit of interest is about knitting: In Three Go, Anna is shown chaperoning the trips et al to a little pond in which to paddle, and Mary-Lou looks through the hedge to see Anna walking along, knitting. In Germany, knitting was something that was done all the time and in all places, even at concerts or the theatre, although Mrs Sidgwick (the author) notes that this practice was dying out by 1908. I wonder if Elinor saw Austrian women walking along knitting, when she was there?


According to 'Behind The Chalet School' Elinor was forever knitting. - Now I'm looking for the passage, I can't seem to find it! :roll:
But, if it's true, perhaps this is is what EBD did frequently and why it's mentioned in the book(s) from time to time.

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