Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 25 Sep 2017, 10:49

Forum rules


Please ensure that all posts are kept impersonal. Any posts involving an ad hominem attack will be edited or deleted. Please feel free to express your views, but expect that others may disagree with them. Please limit the use of the :oops: smiley as far as possible. Please do not PM another user to argue with them; if this happens, please can the recipient contact a mod. Language of gentlemen, chaps!



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 84 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 01 May 2017, 23:51 
Offline
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
User avatar

Joined: 01 Jul 2006, 15:44
Posts: 446
Location: North Lanarkshire, Scotland
This week’s discussion is The Highland Twins at the Chalet School, first published in 1942. This book covers the winter term two years after the end of Goes To It, and once again the war is at the forefront of much of the action. Two little-travelled girls from a remote Scottish island, Flora and Fiona McDonald, are sent to the Chalet School via an acquaintance of Jo’s when their home is taken over by the Government for secret war work. They soon run afoul of Betty Wynne-Davies and a Nazi spy, with near-disastrous consequences. Meanwhile, several old faces from the Tyrol days reappear, having escaped from the occupied Continent, and deep sorrow comes to Jo when Jack is reported drowned. Notable events:

Jo receives a letter from an acquaintance, Jean Mackenzie, who writes with news of the McDonald family, some distant cousins of her mother’s who live on the remote island of Erisay in the Outer Hebrides. The Admiralty are taking over the island, and the four youngest McDonald siblings who live there – Kenneth, Shiena, Flora and Fiona – must move out at once. Kenneth is to go to school, Shiena will be called up, and Jean writes to suggest that twins Flora and Fiona go to the Chalet School, but first spend a few week at Plas Gwyn to acclimatise to life away from Erisay. After talking it over with Robin, Jo agrees.
Shiena and the twins make the long journey from Erisay down to Armiford, and on the train from Newcastle to Leeds make the acquaintance of some W.A.A.F.s, who look after them when the train is halted by an air raid.
Jo drives over to Armiford the next morning to meet them, although she has to wait at the Lucys’ first as the air raid has delayed their journey by some three hours. She takes them back to Plas Gwyn and helps them settle in.
A week later, the day after the girls arrive back at school for the new term, Jo takes Shiena and the twins up to the school to acquaint them with the place, and calls Julie Lucy, Nancy Chester and the Ozanne twins over to show the twins around.
Although the initial plan was for the twins to wait until half-term before starting at the school, they are soon enamoured enough with their new friends and surroundings to ask if they can start lessons on Monday with the rest. Jo, surprised but pleased, agrees and contrives to make them some school frocks out of some old ones she has left over from her last year at school.
The twins start at the school as day girls on the first day of lessons, and have an enjoyable morning soaking up the new experiences. They are put into Upper Second with Julie, Nancy, the Ozanne twins, Bride, Primula and Co. After rest period, however, Fiona gets on the wrong side of Betty Wynne-Davies when she accidentally catches the latter’s fingers in her deck chair, and Betty snarls at her. Fiona is soon cheered up by her friends and forgets about the incident, but a fuming Flora privately vows revenge on Betty.
Three weeks later, the twins arrive home from school to the news that Simone and her three month old daughter, Thérèse, are coming to live with Jo for the present as André has been moved to a defence area where they cannot be with him.
We also learn that Frieda now has an eighteen month old son and is living at a house called Cartref in the village, and that Gottfried and Gisela are coming to Wales as Gottfried is re-joining the San. They now have four daughters – Natalie, Gisel, Gretchen and Jacquetta – and a new son, Toni. Another son, Florian, born not long after the war began and named after Herr Marani, had lived only three weeks, and Robin warns the twins not to say anything to Gisela about it.
Simone arrives with Thérèse and receives a warm welcome, and Jo drops a hint that she is expecting again when she begs to be allowed to put the baby to bed.
Later that evening, Jo receives a phone call from Miss Annersley asking her and Simone to come up to the school the next day, as a wire has arrived signed by ‘Two of the Peace League’, who hope to reach the school then. The twins are told about the League, and everyone speculates on who the girls could be, with Emmie and Joanna Linders mentioned as possibilities. We learn that Wanda von Glück named one of her daughters Emmie Joanna in honour of them, as it was their brother Karl and two cousins who had helped Friedel and Bruno escape from a concentration camp back in Exile.
The next day, the mysterious guests arrive, and everyone is thrilled to discover that they are indeed Emmie and Joanna, who have escaped from Germany with their aunt and uncle and come to seek refuge at the school, as Karl is currently a PoW and unable to help them, and their aunt and uncle have gone on to Portugal.
After a Guide meeting the following day, the twins and their friends have another run-in with Betty Wynne-Davies and a follower, known as Floppy Bill, and Betty slaps Fiona across the face, much to everyone’s horror. The twins’ friends take Fiona away to bathe her cheek and impress her not to let on what happened, before they go into a special assembly to hear the story of Emmie and Joanna’s escape.
When the Linders’ uncle received covert word that he was under suspicion by the Gestapo, he, his wife, Emmie and Joanna managed to disguise themselves and escape the small town they lived in, walking for two weeks until they reached occupied France. Here they parted, with the girls making tracks for St Malo, where a fisherman managed to get them across to England.
At the end of Emmie’s story, Miss Annersley mentions the Peace League document, the whereabouts of which is currently known only to Jo. Flora whispers to Nancy that it sounds similar to the Chart of Erisay, which holds all the secrets of the island.
Two days later, Nella and Vanna ask Flora about the Chart, and are overheard by Betty. Flora refuses to talk about it, saying that Fiona had been angry with her for mentioning it as it was, but does mention that she and Fiona were given it by Shiena to keep safe, and she describes the island itself in detail. Betty vows to get a hold of the Chart and show it around to everyone to pay the twins back for their cheek two days before.
Later that week, on a walk to the Round House, Betty tells Floppy Bill and another girl, Hilda Hope, about the descriptions of Erisay she overheard Flora giving, and mentions the Chart. She is overheard through the trees by a Nazi spy who happens to have come to Howells looking for the Chart, having traced Shiena there and believing she may have left it with Jo now that she has gone to join the W.R.N.S.
Meanwhile, the Juniors have gone on a walk to the village, and Miss Linton, the twins and their group of friends stop in at Plas Gwyn to deliver a parcel, where they discover that another Old Girl has turned up – Elisaveta, with her three children and her maid Arletta. Belsornia and Mirania, the country of Elisaveta’s husband Raphael, have been taken over by the Nazis, Elisaveta’s father is in hiding in Belsornia, and her husband has gone to Egypt to try and raise a Belsornian/Miranian army.
Elisaveta tells her story; she, her children and Arletta escaped into Turkey, across the Mediterranean to Tunis, then to Algiers, then Spain, then Portugal, then England, where the Princess did char work until she had earned enough to get her party to Plas Gwyn, where she intends to remain incognito as Mrs Helston for a while. The party from the school are sworn to secrecy until further notice.
Elisaveta faints with exhaustion later that day, and everyone is ordered away from Plas Gwyn until she recovers. Simone takes Thérèse off to the school to take over the maths lessons there, as Miss Slater, the maths mistress, has broken her leg in a cycling accident and is out of action for the rest of the term.
Two days later, bored by a long spell of rain, some of the Tyrol era girls tell the others stories of exploits from those days, including the infamous incident of Biddy O’Ryan telling Irish folklore tales to Leafy dormy and spooking Alixe von Elsen into sleepwalking. This inspires the Juniors to ask Fiona to tell stories before Lights Out.
After four nights of storytelling without being caught, Fiona tells such a frightening story that she spooks herself into sleepwalking, and Flora senses it and follows suit. Miss Wilson, Robin and Mary Shand also wake up for various reasons and go exploring. Miss Wilson discovers the twins and follows them, while Robin and Mary hear a disturbance in the Upper Second form room. They discover a man there rifling through the lockers, and chase him out into the grounds where he falls into the pond before finally escaping.
The next day, Rosalie Dene goes to tea at Plas Gwyn, and on the way back find herself obliged to walk up the drive of Plas Howell in the dark, as her torch has gone out and the one she has borrowed from the lodgekeeper’s wife fails to work. As she walks up the drive, she realises that someone is tailing her, walking on the grass nearby. She makes a dash for the house but loses her way and faints with fright. Her assailant carries her to the house, where she is discovered by Evan Evans and carried inside. The twins, who have heard about the burglar raiding their lockers and are worried their secret has been discovered, spot her being brought in and are horrified.
Meanwhile, Betty overhears Robin and Daisy discussing her and the fact that her friendships don’t last, and vows to pay them back. She writes to an old friend of her deceased mother’s and asks her to translate some phrases into Gaelic demanding the Chart of Erisay, which she then sends in a note to the twins. Horrified, they dash off to discuss what to do, missing part of a maths lesson with Miss Edwards.
As the twins refuse to say anything about the Chart or why they missed class, they end up in Matron’s room for most of the day, not knowing who to tell. Eventually Flora asks if they can tell Jo, and she duly comes up to the school, where they confide in her about the Chart. Jo takes it to lodge at the bank for safety.
After taking the twins to apologise to Matron and Miss Edwards, Jo mentions Hugh’s name, and Fiona, who has second sight, sees that his ship has been sunk and his lifeboat gunned, and that he has drowned. Shiena sends word several days later that he has indeed been killed as Fiona described.
Just after the triplets’ third birthday, Robin and Daisy are with Jo and the triplets at Plas Gwyn when a wire arrives with the news that Jack is drowned. Jo goes to her room to be alone, and Daisy runs through a mist to the Round House to fetch Madge and Jem, who come down to Plas Gwyn to comfort Jo.
The news of Jack’s death is kept quiet for several days, then the Head tells the Staff. Fiona overhears Simone and Gillian Linton talk about it, and hides away to think it over. Flora discovers her, and they try to use her second sight to see if Jack really is dead, but she is unable to see anything. Flora suggests they ask to go to Plas Gwyn so that Fiona can hold something of Jack’s to try and help. They ask Miss Annersley, who rather reluctantly agrees. At Plas Gwyn, Jo gives Fiona Jack’s rosary beads, and she sees that he is alive but injured.
The next incident to occur is the capture of the spy, and the school is called together, as he has admitted that one of the girls told him openly about the Chart of Erisay he had been trying to steal. It transpires that he had approached Betty one evening in the garden, recognising her as the girl he had overheard in the woods some weeks ago, and talked her into giving herself away. She had agreed to help him by leaving open the Upper Second form window so that he could get in to rifle the lockers the night Robin and Mary caught him.
Although Miss Annersley has no choice but to expel Betty, she, Jo and Janie Lucy arrange between them to try and help her by arranging for her to make her home with Mrs Graves for the future instead of with her unfeeling guardian, Mr Irons.
The term ends with the annual Christmas play, written for the first time by Jo. When the day of the play arrives, Jem brings Jo and a newly-returned Jack, who was indeed rescued and looked after as Fiona had seen.

So, another action-packed wartime entry here, what did people think? What did you think of the twins and the McDonald clan as a whole, including their history and the Chart of Erisay? Did you find the Nazi spy/Betty storyline plausible? What about the escapes of the various Old Girls who appear? What did you think of the second sight storyline and Jack’s supposed drowning?

_________________
'We command the power of the elements. Storm, Earth and Fire! I'd never dress like an oversized chicken and shoot moon beams from the sky' - Stormcaller Jalara


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 03:07 
Offline
Coming top in the form
Coming top in the form
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2007, 15:45
Posts: 501
Location: Australia
Hi,

I like the twins and the 'family' atmosphere of this book. But it's sad we hear very little about the twins after this books.

And it must have been quite uncomfortable for Betty and Liz to know the entire school knew about their friendship breakup and was gossiping about what had happened.

I think Betty's descent into her final act was beautifully shown. She is essentially isolated with no close friends and no family she could turn to for help and advice. I think she only needed one person to talk to and she would have come to her senses.

cheers,
Joyce

_________________
It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how - Dr Seuss


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 03:15 
Offline
Rescued by doctors
Rescued by doctors

Joined: 19 Sep 2011, 22:32
Posts: 794
When I was young and had read few of the books I considered this book one of the "Big Three" along with Exile and School At The Chalet. Of course, it wasn't really but I considered it so because I was desperate to read the part about Jack's supposed drowning!

I do think it was possibly one of my first CS books as I still have my hardback copy which was reprinted in 1962.

Reading it as a child I thought it a good thriller for children really. Being from the north of Scotland I thought the Scottishness really overdone especially in the highland accents of the twins. Why though were eyebrows raised at their accents? No eyebrows were raised for French accents or Norwegian accents etc etc. The twins were "gentry" although they did come from a remote Scottish island so would they have spoken as they did?

Would girls in 1942 have worn full Highland dress except for something exceptional? I have never seen girls dressed like this in my life unless maybe for dancing.

Why on earth did Shiena not put the Chart quietly into a bank instead of putting her little sisters into danger but would the twins still have been searched even if she had done this?

I loved all the scenes at Jo's home and the twins with Bride etc.

I thought EBD wrote movingly and well the chapter where Jo is told Jack is missing. Madge and Jem, Robin and Daisy were all well described. Interesting that when Madge and Jem are told of Jack's death, Jem's thoughts were of Jack but Madge's only of her sister.

Jack's "death" was never portrayed as being final though. Miss Annersley told her to have hope and with the second sight scene she was able to have hope. I wonder what would have happened to Jo if Jack really had been dead?

The second sight was quite powerful for a children's book. I do think i believe in this.

In real life, I wonder if Betty's only punishment would have been expulsion from school. After all the police and army knew what she had done.

This is also the first book in which we really see Rosalie as secretary.

A book which really covered a lot.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 03:29 
Offline
Rescued by doctors
Rescued by doctors

Joined: 19 Sep 2011, 22:32
Posts: 794
Joyce wrote:
Hi,

I like the twins and the 'family' atmosphere of this book. But it's sad we hear very little about the twins after this books.

And it must have been quite uncomfortable for Betty and Liz to know the entire school knew about their friendship breakup and was gossiping about what had happened.

I think Betty's descent into her final act was beautifully shown. She is essentially isolated with no close friends and no family she could turn to for help and advice. I think she only needed one person to talk to and she would have come to her senses.

cheers,
Joyce


I always wondered if Liz could have done more for Betty. When Liz started to mature she seems to have dropped Betty completely but maybe Betty was so difficult anything else was impossible and Liz was also young. At the end though Liz does seem to have thought she could have done more.

As Joyce also says the twins really were there for one book only.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 07:51 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7178
Location: Manchester
I find this one a bit daft, to be honest. Would a young woman and two little girls really have been wearing what sounds like full male Highland dress? Why does everything that Flora, Fiona and Shiena say have to be written as they supposedly pronounce it? I think other authors of the time did similar things, but we don't get, say, Simone's speech being written in a French accent. And why on earth didn't Elisaveta contact the Belsornian embassy or the school as soon as she arrived in Britain? If she could save up enough for taxis and new clothes, surely she could have found enough money for a phone box! I know - the book was written for children! But still. And why is it never made clear exactly who was chasing Rosalie?

I think the best scene in this is when Madge tells Jem that Jack's been killed, and Jem is so shocked and upset that Madge pours him a drink (brandy?). The male doctors aren't usually allowed to show that sort of emotion: they have to be strong and take charge all the time. It's only for a moment, before Jem takes charge again, but it's a good scene.

I'm not keen on the second sight storyline, though. I've got no objection to a storyline about second sight per se, but I don't think it was appropriate to have it in the context of a man reported lost during the war, especially when the book was published during the war and many readers would have lost friends or relatives, and some of them must have known people missing in action at that very time. It would have been better if Fiona had "seen" someone who'd got lost in bad weather, or something like that. And I know they argued about it, but I'm surprised that Hilda and Nell agreed to let Fiona "look" with Joey, who was, obviously, in a very fragile mental state, in attendance. It's interesting that Madge and Jem seem to know nothing about it: I don't think they'd have thought it was a good idea.

Exile and Goes To It are so real, and ... I don't know, maybe EBD wanted to do something different and thought she'd write about the supernatural, as she'd done in Maids of La Rochelle.

Sorry for the essay! One last thing. That is real. What a snobby cow Jean Mackenzie, whoever she is, is! "But I know you don't want evacuee children if you can help it with the precious three, and you know that as soon it's known that you have two or three rooms to spare you'll be landed." It annoys me anyway that we don't see Madge and Joey doing war work, and that bit in the letter is horrible. I know Jean isn't a CS person, but it's so out of step with what the CS ethos is supposed to be. Gah!

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 09:27 
Offline
Rescued by doctors
Rescued by doctors

Joined: 30 Jan 2004, 00:07
Posts: 794
Location: Taiwan
I find I quite like this book, in spite of the weird mish-mash of plot elements.

The Scottish part is a bit odd - I was also under the impression that they were decked out in traditional men's clothing, and the way the accent is written doesn't bring any Scottish accent I've ever heard to mind. Then we've got more in the steady stream of Europeans working their way over to the CS - not only do we have Elisaveta and family arriving, but also the Linders girls. The Erisay plot and the enemy spies strikes me as a very classic wartime plot, worthy of Angela Brazil.

Actually, I wonder if the school wasn't under surveillance from the British side, what with all the random people escaping from Nazi Austria and making their way into the school's orbit (and employ), and the fact that this is the second time a Nazi spy has infiltrated the school.

The second sight plot reminds me very strongly of LMM's Emily books, where Emily's second sight plays a strong role.

It is clear that Joey does not want to get involved in war work or do anything that takes her away from the triplets, and interestingly, it's Robin who brings up that point, quite matter of factly.

I also think it would have been interesting to see what would have happened if Jack really had been dead, leaving Joey a young widow with four children, but I think I'll split that off as a separate thread.

ETA: one thing I do like about the book is the interaction among the juniors, with the various Bettany and La Rochelle members. They start out as very vivid characters, in spite of their young ages.

_________________


Ring the bells that still can ring; Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything; That's how the light gets in
Anthem: Leonard Cohen



Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 10:33 
Offline
Coming top in the form
Coming top in the form
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2007, 15:45
Posts: 501
Location: Australia
Alison H wrote:
And why is it never made clear exactly who was chasing Rosalie?

"But I know you don't want evacuee children if you can help it with the precious three, and you know that as soon it's known that you have two or three rooms to spare you'll be landed." It annoys me anyway that we don't see Madge and Joey doing war work, and that bit in the letter is horrible.


I think we are supposed to believe she was chased by the spy. But exactly why he chased her went over my head.

It's interesting that Jean says she knows Joey doesn't want evacuee children because it indicates that Joey is calmly going around telling people that very fact.

And were people actually allowed to refuse? And if you had the room and means, then what excuse would have been acceptable?

Cheers,
Joyce

_________________
It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how - Dr Seuss


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 11:22 
Offline
Remove to Inter V
Remove to Inter V
User avatar

Joined: 21 Oct 2014, 13:26
Posts: 407
I find Flora and Fiona very irritating. The ridiculous accent, the national costume etc is just completely unrealistic. Otherwise I really like this book. There's lots of lovely domestic detail, and it follows on really well from Exile and Goes To It.

I also love the scene where Jo pops into Janie Lucey for breakfast when the twins' train is late. It's nice to see her having friends and a life away from the school. In fact, there's a general sense in this book of Jo and co. being part of a wider community.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 12:43 
Offline
Arranging your timetable with Miss Dene
User avatar

Joined: 13 May 2015, 20:15
Posts: 101
Location: Cumbria
This isn't a book I have read properly but it did strike me, from the text and the cover picture, that the twins appeared to be wearing male national costume.That has always confused me a little.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 16:16 
Offline
Concerned about new girl
Concerned about new girl

Joined: 20 Jan 2004, 00:49
Posts: 1917
Location: midwestern US
To me, the accent reads just like the one that Scottish author Jane Duncan had her highland characters use when mimicking the minister from the Hebrides, except that the girls render it "softly" rather than in the context of thunderous sermons. Given that EBD's only known visit to Scotland was to the Hebrides, it makes sense that she would place her Scottish characters there and try to use the local accent.

I don't think the kilts would be out of place, particularly for girls the twins' age. Certainly they would have been practical, and probably passed down as older kids outgrew them. However, the Glengarry bonnets with feathers depicted on the cover do seem a bit much. (Not that I don't own one myself, though without the feathers, as I was not exactly up to pipe major standard back in my bagpipe band days.)

_________________
Castor oil: Triacylglycerol from Ricinus communis containing hydroxy-fatty acids.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 02 May 2017, 18:31 
Offline
Promising to do better
Promising to do better

Joined: 17 Nov 2011, 02:45
Posts: 752
People were often quite open about not wanting evacuees, and it's also noticeable that evacuees were more likely to be placed with people from lower socio-ecomonic classes. In other words, the middle-classes often did evade responsibilty. They tended to have influence with billeting officers (who were PLU), for example and were more likely to make a nuisance of themselves if they were not happy.

On the other hand, the number of places needed was over-estimated (especially once people started to return to their original areas) and the billeting allowances paid meant that some poorer families benefited from having evacuees - even if it might not have been the best thing for the evacuees.

I think that the attitude of people in this book - towards evacuees, towards shortages - and the grumbling are very realistic and are confirmed by the Mass Observation records.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 02:20 
Offline
Coming top in the form
Coming top in the form
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2007, 15:45
Posts: 501
Location: Australia
Victoria wrote:
People were often quite open about not wanting evacuees, and it's also noticeable that evacuees were more likely to be placed with people from lower socio-ecomonic classes. In other words, the middle-classes often did evade responsibilty. They tended to have influence with billeting officers (who were PLU), for example and were more likely to make a nuisance of themselves if they were not happy.


Thanks for explaining. For some reason I had an idyllic view that people were happy to help out the war effort and happily took in evacuees. Clearly I overestimated the milk of human kindness :D

Cheers,
Joyce

_________________
It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how - Dr Seuss


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 08:11 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7178
Location: Manchester
A TV programme last year, marking the centenary of the Women's Institute, quoted letters from snooty WI members in a posh part of the North West saying that they didn't want to be lumbered with dirty, smelly working-class kids from Manchester and Liverpool - the two cities which my family come from. I've been rather sensitive about the subject ever since :roll: :lol:. A lot of the evacuees were from inner city areas, which were at high risk of bombing because they were where the factories were, so there was a certain amount of snobbery. But I suppose a lot of people just didn't fancy the disruption. We probably all like to think we'd've rushed to help, but having strange kids to live with you is a big undertaking. It's snobbery in Jean's case, though, because she's suggesting that Jo should take the two strange kids she's recommended rather than random evacuees.

Going back to Jack, IIRC, the first time we're officially told that he's alive is when he turns up at the Christmas play! Jo must have been notified weeks and probably months earlier. We don't see her getting the good news, and we don't see their reunion.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 08:36 
Offline
Being rude to your sheepdog
User avatar

Joined: 01 Oct 2016, 05:46
Posts: 40
This is one of the books I only have as an Armada paperback, and I'd *really* like to read the uncut version. Armada cut all the Elizaveta bits, and who knows what else was left out. :(

Unfortunately I only discovered the republished GGBP books too late, after Highland Twins had been released.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 09:31 
Offline
Having a say in the Sale theme
Having a say in the Sale theme
User avatar

Joined: 16 Jan 2004, 22:19
Posts: 3591
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Joyce wrote:
Victoria wrote:
People were often quite open about not wanting evacuees, and it's also noticeable that evacuees were more likely to be placed with people from lower socio-ecomonic classes. In other words, the middle-classes often did evade responsibilty. They tended to have influence with billeting officers (who were PLU), for example and were more likely to make a nuisance of themselves if they were not happy.


Thanks for explaining. For some reason I had an idyllic view that people were happy to help out the war effort and happily took in evacuees. Clearly I overestimated the milk of human kindness :D

Cheers,
Joyce


Sadly, Joyce, some of that milk had turned because the Blitz recorded some of the highest crime rates of the 20th century. There was a huge amount of theft that went on. You might find this article interesting if you want to read more.

_________________
The writer's credo: 'Sometimes you've got to sacrifice the things you like' (Delta Goodrem - Born To Try)


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 09:47 
Offline
Castor Oil!
Castor Oil!
User avatar

Joined: 27 Sep 2006, 12:44
Posts: 552
Location: Bedfordshire
Don't know if anyone's watched The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe where the Pevensies are evacuated at the start of the film; they watch two children getting off at the stop before them and the woman reads the label attached to the girl and then waves her on - doesn't appear very caring!


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 10:44 
Offline
Despairing over Geometry
Despairing over Geometry
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 2497
Location: West London Alps
bythebrook wrote:
This is one of the books I only have as an Armada paperback, and I'd *really* like to read the uncut version. Armada cut all the Elizaveta bits, and who knows what else was left out. :(

Unfortunately I only discovered the republished GGBP books too late, after Highland Twins had been released.
Yes, unfortunately this has now turned into one of the titles that's hard to come by in anything other than the Armada/ Collins cut version, many of them offered at £30-plus for some reason - the original hard-backed Chambers versions start at about £20, which is clearly a no-brainer in terms of value, irrespective of condition.

I haven't seen (though admittedly I didn't look in depth) anyone selling the GGBP reprint from 2003. What did stagger me was an Armada three-titles-in-one volume (Exile, At War, Highland Twins) priced at a modest £3,054.62 - and the seller had the nerve to be asking for postage on top of that!

Perhaps this indicates that GGBP might do well out of a second reprint...


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 11:43 
Offline
Remove to Inter V
Remove to Inter V
User avatar

Joined: 21 Oct 2014, 13:26
Posts: 407
Noreen wrote:
bythebrook wrote:
This is one of the books I only have as an Armada paperback, and I'd *really* like to read the uncut version. Armada cut all the Elizaveta bits, and who knows what else was left out. :(

Unfortunately I only discovered the republished GGBP books too late, after Highland Twins had been released.
Yes, unfortunately this has now turned into one of the titles that's hard to come by in anything other than the Armada/ Collins cut version, many of them offered at £30-plus for some reason - the original hard-backed Chambers versions start at about £20, which is clearly a no-brainer in terms of value, irrespective of condition.

I haven't seen (though admittedly I didn't look in depth) anyone selling the GGBP reprint from 2003. What did stagger me was an Armada three-titles-in-one volume (Exile, At War, Highland Twins) priced at a modest £3,054.62 - and the seller had the nerve to be asking for postage on top of that!

Perhaps this indicates that GGBP might do well out of a second reprint...


That is unbelievable. I sincerely hope no one was stupid enough to pay such a greedy price. You would get all three books in uncut hardbacks with good condition dustjackets for a fraction of that.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 12:20 
Offline
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
Having Miss Ferrars as Form Mistress
User avatar

Joined: 01 Jul 2006, 15:44
Posts: 446
Location: North Lanarkshire, Scotland
It's a pity this one is so hard to find uncut, because it really does read like a different - and much better - book. I never rated this title that much until I finally got it in hardback, it was a revelation. GGBP would surely clean up if they did another print run.

_________________
'We command the power of the elements. Storm, Earth and Fire! I'd never dress like an oversized chicken and shoot moon beams from the sky' - Stormcaller Jalara


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Highland Twins at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 May 2017, 12:28 
Offline
Despairing over Geometry
Despairing over Geometry
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 2497
Location: West London Alps
Vintagejazz wrote:
That is unbelievable. I sincerely hope no one was stupid enough to pay such a greedy price. You would get all three books in uncut hardbacks with good condition dustjackets for a fraction of that.
Absolutely - and I would even expect to be able to buy all 58 CS titles in Chambers or GGBP editions (if only as reading copies) for very much less than that too - but you do see these crazy prices for CS books from time to time.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 84 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 25 Sep 2017, 10:49

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group