Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 22 Sep 2017, 12:44

Forum rules


Please ensure that all posts are kept impersonal. Any posts involving an ad hominem attack will be edited or deleted. Please feel free to express your views, but expect that others may disagree with them. Please limit the use of the :oops: smiley as far as possible. Please do not PM another user to argue with them; if this happens, please can the recipient contact a mod. Language of gentlemen, chaps!



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: School standards
PostPosted: 29 Jul 2017, 22:47 
Offline
Getting all your textbooks for lessons

Joined: 19 Nov 2015, 19:38
Posts: 72
Lots of characters seem to have been home schooled e.g. Mary Lou or small private school e.g. Jacynth or governess, e.g. Verity. Was it historically permissible to do this?
I know that many of the CS staff are not qualified by today's standards but could parents just decide to opt out of the national education system?
Can't even take them on holiday out of term now!


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 29 Jul 2017, 23:27 
Offline
Sheepdogging a new girl
Sheepdogging a new girl
User avatar

Joined: 20 Jan 2004, 00:18
Posts: 1746
Location: Ireland
You can still homeschool your children if you want. I know several people who do it (in the UK and Ireland).

_________________
Read all about my travels in South America...


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 30 Jul 2017, 00:23 
Offline
Taking the train home
Taking the train home
User avatar

Joined: 13 Aug 2009, 18:41
Posts: 2614
Location: Czech Republic and Herts UK
NanaG wrote:
Can't even take them on holiday out of term now!

You can if they are not in a state school....

_________________
Cestina's dolls houses - "But there's never a rose like you..."


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 30 Jul 2017, 08:27 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7178
Location: Manchester
The legal requirement is that children have to be educated, not that they have to attend school. It's legal to "home school" them, and, if doing so, there's no requirement to follow the national curriculum, or for them to be taught by someone with any teaching qualifications at all.

I can understand it if, say, the child has special needs which the parents feel aren't being met at school, or if the child's not well enough to go to school full time, or if there've been issues e.g. bullying. With Mary-Lou and Verity, none of that applied. But it is perfectly legal. The Wintertons' case is more interesting: Mrs Winterton had been bullied so badly at school herself that she was nervous about the same thing happening to Polly and Lalla. Armada chopped that bit out :evil: .

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 30 Jul 2017, 09:18 
Offline
Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2004, 21:57
Posts: 563
Location: UP NORTH
I think EBD stretched belief a bit with so many girls having governesses or being home-schooled. Also the number who don't live near a school to make it possible, suggests that education of girls wasn't that important.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 30 Jul 2017, 12:24 
Offline
Discovering you have to be trilingual
User avatar

Joined: 07 Oct 2004, 12:14
Posts: 63
Location: Brisbane
Mel wrote:
I think EBD stretched belief a bit with so many girls having governesses or being home-schooled. Also the number who don't live near a school to make it possible, suggests that education of girls wasn't that important.

Back in the days when EBD started writing schooling for girls still wasn't considered important to the extent it is now, that's partly why a lot of girls didn't ever go to school- if there was nowhere close by then their parents often wouldn't put themselves out to arrange for transport etc, so either the girls were taught at home, or not at all Many of them being of the class that would 'stay at home and help mother' it was often considered even in the 1920s that education wasn't essential for girls.
With this, as with so many other things she just didn't move with the times.

_________________

'Well,call me Aunt Fanny on my tombstone!'

Rosalie in 'Theodora...'


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 30 Jul 2017, 13:06 
Offline
Finding out about the Sale
Finding out about the Sale
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2006, 13:28
Posts: 847
Location: SE England
Up to the 1950s, it wouldn't be unrealistic not to have access to an academic secondary education. I grew up in a bog standard suburban area. There was no grammar school for boys or girls in my borough until 1955. People had to go out of borough. The grammar schools (boys and girls) that many people went to from my borough were two towns away. The schools had to serve the town itself, a semi rural area on its other side, and my suburban area.

If you lived in a rural or semi rural area and your local market town didn't have a grammar school, you were stuck, really. Polly and Lala's problems arose from them living somewhere so rural that there was no decent day school for them to go to. They'd have been perfectly OK at a Yorkshire equivalent of Taverton High.

_________________
Thoughts of a writer and historian


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 11:52 
Offline
Getting all your textbooks for lessons
User avatar

Joined: 29 Jul 2008, 16:17
Posts: 82
Location: Goole
I'm sure when Elanor was writing it would be about right, you see it costs a lot to go to boarding school. I don't think we ever find out how much. So you're going to have to be rich or get a scholarship. Now say that you are rich, it's hardly likely especially in those days to go to a public school and so you'd attend a private school or be home schooled until you're old enough to attend the private boarding school your parents want you to.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 20:32 
Offline
Promising to do better
Promising to do better

Joined: 17 Nov 2011, 02:45
Posts: 751
The High School at Taverton would have taken both fee-paying and "scholars" (usually people who would have passed the 11-plus). It wasn't a "public" school in the way that we think of them today Free secondary education for all was not established until the 1944 Education Act

High schools tended to have good reputations and would have been the school of choice for many middle-class parents whether or not their daughters would have needed to earn their own livings. It would have been the obvious local school for the Bettanys.
Sending a girl to boarding school would have been more likely to happen if there wasn't a high school or an equivalent locally (and we do see EBD mentioning this, for example, with the Wintertons) and many local private girls' schools would have been seen as "second-rate" (as was the local school that Beth Chester attends)

In terms of educational standards, it needs to be remembered that Miss Buss and Miss Beale's original attempts to educate teachers only brought teachers to the level we would think of as "GCSE" - educational standards for teachers at that time were so low.

Girls' school benefitted tremendously once women started going to university. Because there so few jobs available to educated women, many highly intelligent and well-qualified women went into teaching - many would have been better qualified than the staff of boys' minor public schools and prep schools.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 14 Aug 2017, 22:49 
Offline
Playing Impertinent Questions
Playing Impertinent Questions
User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2005, 21:21
Posts: 590
Location: On the sofa
Although my parents believed - and made considerable sacrifices to fulfil that belief - that boarding-school was the best possible education for their children, they also had me take the 11-plus in case unforeseen circumstances meant I couldn't stay at the school and would have to go to the High School. This was in the 1960s - the local High School offered a perfectly good education and I was to meet several girls who had been there when I did a secretarial course.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: School standards
PostPosted: 15 Aug 2017, 00:16 
Offline
Being told to stand on your own two feet
Being told to stand on your own two feet
User avatar

Joined: 04 Jan 2012, 06:47
Posts: 150
Location: North Carolina, USA
Home-schooling is not uncommon in the United States, especially for parents who want to give their children a religion-based education. Students are expected to meet government education standards and a lot of them go on to university. I image the latter wasn't much of a concern in EBD's time when girls were expected to stay home and then get married.

_________________
"I -- I didn't think!" -- Carola Johnstone


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 22 Sep 2017, 12:44

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group