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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 20 Aug 2018, 12:17 
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Very true :lol: . The same with Gwendoline Mary at Malory Towers and numerous other characters in school stories!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 20 Aug 2018, 19:56 
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Joyce wrote:
If I went home at that age and said XX's mum and dad gave me spending money and a pretty brooch, my mother would feel it was an obligation and we needed to return the favour. I can see that attitude can cause issues though because the other parent would think "we didn't treat your daughter in order to be repaid."

And the entire half term - treats, money, gifts etc - is going behind Pro Fry's back anyway and against his express wishes. Even if he is wrong to carry on punishing her, he expressly said 'no treats' and Joey and Jack choose to ignore him.

Ricky lies by omission to him as well in her letter when she pretends to be working.


I can see why some parents would feel a need to return the favour, or be uncomfortable that their children received such gifts, but I'm not sure that applies to Professor Fry. I think he would be angry not because he was now obligated to the Maynards but because his daughter had a fun time when she wasn't supposed to. The circumstances that led to that are his fault though. It's clear that Joey holds Professor Fry partly responsible for his rift with Ricky, and I wouldn't expect her to mete out a punishment with which she disagrees.

I also don't blame Ricki for lying to her father. Granted she's happy to circumvent her dad's rules, but telling him the truth would have caused trouble for her and the Maynards and there's no point inviting that. Professor Fry is already being very unreasonable and stubborn by ignoring the fact the school won't take Ricki for the weekend. I'd be careful what I say to someone like that too!

jennifer wrote:
The whole half-term fuss about there being no-one at the school doesn't make much sense in the first place. In a a school that size there's going to be someone who comes down with a bad cold or a stomach virus, or sprains an ankle, or is on Head's Report and barred from the half-term trip, so there'd have to be some plans for looking after girls who weren't going on the trip.


How common are Head's Reports that actually ban students from half-term? I feel they are used as threats but rarely as actual punishments. I can envision terms where no girls are banned from trips. Students who are too ill to leave school would have medical staff to assist them, but probably not teachers who could also assign work to and monitor Ricki. Even if there are girls left behind for whatever reason, that doesn't mean the school should keep a student for her father's convenience. Just because I do something for Person A doesn't mean I have to do it for Person B in a completely different set of circumstances.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 20 Aug 2018, 23:09 
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mynameisdumbnuts wrote:

How common are Head's Reports that actually ban students from half-term? I feel they are used as threats but rarely as actual punishments.


The only one I can think of is mentioned in one of the Island books when we discover that 3 people were caught copying a key to their Latin a couple of years previously and lost the trip as a result (can't remember the book!).

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 21 Aug 2018, 00:00 
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When they are on the Island they only have day trips and staff take it in turns to have days off so the school would never be closed, so not same situation as a weekend away as in Swiss period. Presunably the parents are all well aware in advance about Swiss trips though not exact details till nearer the time.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 21 Aug 2018, 06:09 
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fio wrote:
The only one I can think of is mentioned in one of the Island books when we discover that 3 people were caught copying a key to their Latin a couple of years previously and lost the trip as a result (can't remember the book!).


It's mentioned in Wrong as having happened 'two years ago' so it rather depends how you work out the timeline.

Most mentions of the punishment are girls avoiding misbehaviour so that they don't get banned from going.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 21 Aug 2018, 07:41 
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What about Joan being told that she was going to spend half term with Mary-Lou, Verity and Katharine, instead of going on her form's trip? She seemed quite pleased about it, but it always annoys me that no-one even asked her! What if she'd said she'd rather spend the holiday with her classmates? It's so rude!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 21 Aug 2018, 19:30 
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fio wrote:
mynameisdumbnuts wrote:

How common are Head's Reports that actually ban students from half-term? I feel they are used as threats but rarely as actual punishments.


The only one I can think of is mentioned in one of the Island books when we discover that 3 people were caught copying a key to their Latin a couple of years previously and lost the trip as a result (can't remember the book!).


That's the only time I could think of, too! And I can't remember which book it is. I think one of the fill-ins fleshed out the incident, and of course, I can't remember that book either. :lol:

But it does give credence to the idea that the school was cleared out at times. Even if girls were too ill/injured to journey overseas back home, couldn't they have gone to the San? The staff there would have found room.

Alison H wrote:
What about Joan being told that she was going to spend half term with Mary-Lou, Verity and Katharine, instead of going on her form's trip? She seemed quite pleased about it, but it always annoys me that no-one even asked her! What if she'd said she'd rather spend the holiday with her classmates? It's so rude!


I can't remember what we the readers learn about how this came about. Did the staff know of Joan's friction with the rest of her form and shrewdly realised she'd see the company of the older girls as a treat? Especially as I'm sure Joan was aware of Mary-Lou's status in the school. The staff may have guessed she would feel flattered to be the new girl singled out for special time with the school superstar. Definitely a gamble, but a rather informed one.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 24 Aug 2018, 20:26 
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jennifer wrote:
When you think about it logically, it doesn't make much sense for most of the UK students to be in Switzerland. Why would their parents send them to Switzerland, when there were plenty of good schools, including a branch of the CS, in England?


They did, though. My mother spent a year at a Swiss school, only during the war years when it was evacuated to Wales. The school has long since closed, but certainly returned to Switzerland as soon as was feasible after the War.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 27 Aug 2018, 13:46 
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Mrs Redboots wrote:
jennifer wrote:
When you think about it logically, it doesn't make much sense for most of the UK students to be in Switzerland. Why would their parents send them to Switzerland, when there were plenty of good schools, including a branch of the CS, in England?


They did, though. My mother spent a year at a Swiss school, only during the war years when it was evacuated to Wales. The school has long since closed, but certainly returned to Switzerland as soon as was feasible after the War.

Why Switzerland, just out of interest? Was it the languages?


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 27 Aug 2018, 13:48 
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Lotte wrote:
Mrs Redboots wrote:
They did, though. My mother spent a year at a Swiss school, only during the war years when it was evacuated to Wales. The school has long since closed, but certainly returned to Switzerland as soon as was feasible after the War.

Why Switzerland, just out of interest? Was it the languages?

Or the ski-ing, perhaps, or the "finishing school" aspect. As I said, it was in Wales when my mother was there, near Aberdovey, so that sort of thing was on hold, anyway.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 28 Aug 2018, 21:13 
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The food! No rationing in Switzerland.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 04:56 
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In the GGBP edition (so happy to have the full text) Richenda’s father refuses to accept any payment for her treatment from the parents of the offending boy. I was wondering how realistic that was? Her treatments and the need for glasses and the recuperating would have some substantial costs attached; why not have them covered as reparations?


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 07:24 
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Given that he seemed to have an extensive collection of very valuable Chinese ceramics, I doubt that money was much of an issue for him.

The school should have had some kind of insurance for outings (though if they did the premiums must have been horrendous!), and if they did that would have covered part of it.

Ultimately, I think he didn't want to give them a chance to salve their concience by allowing them to hand over money. One of the staff (maybe Matron) says when the mother initially offers to pay, "If she has lost her sight, what amount of money could compansate for that?"
Proffessor Fry seems to agree with that attitudeand seems to want to impress upon them that handing out money cannot make up for that type of behaviour and cnsequences must be lived with. If it had been a genuine acccident he would probably have accepted the money.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 10:16 
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Miriam wrote:
Ultimately, I think he didn't want to give them a chance to salve their concience by allowing them to hand over money.
Proffessor Fry seems to agree with that attitudeand seems to want to impress upon them that handing out money cannot make up for that type of behaviour and cnsequences must be lived with. If it had been a genuine acccident he would probably have accepted the money.


I agree. I think it was in some ways to make the father feel the full force of what his son had done. You can't pay your way out of this one, buddy!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 10:23 
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I agree too - he didn't want them to feel that you could just sort something out by paying your victims off.

It's a sad ending to the book, though. Apart from Eustacia, I think Ricki's the only person whose redemption story involves long-term injury ... although her eyes, like Corney's after the plane crash, will apparently have miraculously recovered in a few years' time. I suppose there's also Maureen Donovan, who is condemned to years of ill health and an early grave so that the Chaletians and the Saints can kiss and make up :roll: .

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 21:37 
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Alison H wrote:
I agree too - he didn't want them to feel that you could just sort something out by paying your victims off.

It's a sad ending to the book, though. Apart from Eustacia, I think Ricki's the only person whose redemption story involves long-term injury ... although her eyes, like Corney's after the plane crash, will apparently have miraculously recovered in a few years' time. I suppose there's also Maureen Donovan, who is condemned to years of ill health and an early grave so that the Chaletians and the Saints can kiss and make up :roll: .


I will say (and I may have said this before) I got glasses in my late teens and was told that my eyesight might improve, and it did a few years later. I still have glasses, but a much weaker prescription.

Going back on topic, I always interpreted Professor Fry's motives as showing you couldn't just pay to make it better too.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 05 Sep 2018, 00:45 
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roversgirl wrote:
I will say (and I may have said this before) I got glasses in my late teens and was told that my eyesight might improve, and it did a few years later. I still have glasses, but a much weaker prescription.


My eyesight has changed throughout my life - I got my first glasses when I was 19 (long-sighted, probably eyestrain from University studies), but I only needed to wear them for a few years. I later somehow became short sighted, and now I have presbyopia (long-sighted through age). But in the last month I've been able to read without glasses again!

I get my eyes tested every year, and I'm looking forward to hearing the explanation for my improvement ...


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