Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 11:00

Forum rules


Please ensure that all posts are kept impersonal. Any posts involving an ad hominem attack will be edited or deleted. Please feel free to express your views, but expect that others may disagree with them. Please limit the use of the :oops: smiley as far as possible. Please do not PM another user to argue with them; if this happens, please can the recipient contact a mod. Language of gentlemen, chaps!



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 96 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 Sep 2018, 19:17 
Offline
Going to tea at Freudesheim
Going to tea at Freudesheim
User avatar

Joined: 21 May 2012, 14:59
Posts: 135
jennifer wrote:
I don't think the school could physically feed an observant Jew - keeping kosher is more than just not giving her pork, and the CS kitchen and their grocery suppliers would not be acceptable.

I know, I am Jewish! :P I think, but I'm not 100%, that EBD did have Jewish pupils, though probably not religious ones. I think one of the GGBP editions mentions it when talking about Margaret Roper.

I've seen a couple of Japanese voice actresses called Naomi as well.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 Sep 2018, 19:40 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7972
Location: Manchester
At one time it was quite common for boys, and to a lesser extent girls, from Indian princely families to attend British boarding schools. Nearly all of them would have been either Hindu or Muslim, and some of them must have been religious. I've no idea what arrangements were made about food, festivals, prayers, and religious observance in general, but there must have been some.

I went to a day school where there were people from lots of religious backgrounds, but, as Noreen said, it's easy enough at a day school for someone to bring their own food, have time off for religious observance and, if relevant, be exempted from religious studies lessons.

Not quite the same thing, but I'm sure it's mentioned somewhere that Emerence is a vegetarian - but I get the impression that that was just treated as a fad and she was expected to eat the same as everyone else. Either that or EBD just forgot about it!

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 Sep 2018, 19:47 
Offline
Going to tea at Freudesheim
Going to tea at Freudesheim
User avatar

Joined: 21 May 2012, 14:59
Posts: 135
I thought Emerence being a veggie was a sign that her parents were cranks.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 Sep 2018, 22:03 
Offline
Getting all your textbooks for lessons
User avatar

Joined: 12 Apr 2004, 18:44
Posts: 80
Location: Southampton
On the subject of names, my daughter (born 1992) had a friend at secondary school called Rebecca. When some Greek acquaintances found this out they were very surprised because it was 'a Jewish name'. We were most taken aback by this. Ironically, also, we had gone out of our way to use Latin rather than Old Testament names for our children - our son is Julian, shortened by his friends to Ju and then relongated, as it were, to Jewish Kid! For a while he used a Star of David as his Facebook profile picture. The friends, of course, were all called things like Daniel, Aaron, Josh, Ben etc. All very bizarre.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 Sep 2018, 22:36 
Offline
Giving a Junior an order mark
Giving a Junior an order mark
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 3307
Location: West London Alps
And a lot of what we consider to be Hebrew names are also in use in Muslim families, as some people appear in both the Bible and the Quran. My neighbours' eldest son is called Adam and his recently arrived brother is called Noah (Nûh); their father asked me why I had a Muslim name and I had to explain that it isn't the same name although it's spelt the same in English and pronounced similarly.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 03 Sep 2018, 23:04 
Offline
Being rude to your sheepdog

Joined: 26 Aug 2018, 20:53
Posts: 44
Alison H wrote:
At one time it was quite common for boys, and to a lesser extent girls, from Indian princely families to attend British boarding schools. Nearly all of them would have been either Hindu or Muslim, and some of them must have been religious. I've no idea what arrangements were made about food, festivals, prayers, and religious observance in general, but there must have been some.


One of my close friends attended a British boarding school in the 1970s/80s. He was one of a handful of non-white students there, and was originally Hindu. He was expected to attend Christian RE classes and services, and to adhere to the school diet. He was 8 when he started school. Exclusion from classes and services was possible with parental permission, but it made life uncomfortable for the student, who was often submitted to comments from other students and staff about “special treatment”. Adapting was usually less painful.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 06:56 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7972
Location: Manchester
Oh dear, your poor friend - that sounds difficult.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 07:12 
Offline
...and Results
...and Results

Joined: 29 Aug 2004, 21:55
Posts: 369
Location: Jerusalem, Israel
Lotte wrote:
jennifer wrote:
I don't think the school could physically feed an observant Jew - keeping kosher is more than just not giving her pork, and the CS kitchen and their grocery suppliers would not be acceptable.

I know, I am Jewish! :P I think, but I'm not 100%, that EBD did have Jewish pupils, though probably not religious ones. I think one of the GGBP editions mentions it when talking about Margaret Roper.


These issues led me, when younger, to invent a Jewish version of the CS - which I could then attend. It was located in the Golan (a mountainous area in northern Israel) and we went skiing in winter on the Hermon (which actually does have a ski slope), and went swimming in the summer in the Kinneret (the Sea of Gallilee). Languages were Hebew and English, and when I decided a third language was important I added Yiddish as well (my grandparents spoke Yiddish, and my father understood it, so I could use a few words when I had to - and it is very similar to German, which added authenticity...)

A lot of the scenarios were very easy to transplant, and I could make up a lot more. Naomi was never a member of my CS - I only invited popular characters who would have been my friends, and converted them to being jewish without too much trouble about details.

Joey was there, at various ages, but there was never an equivalnt of Freudesheim. Thinking about it, I never added an equivalent of the San. I must have been less into medicine in those days.

_________________
... Anna made up her mind for once and all that there must be something about the Chalet School that affected all concerned with it with mild insanity!


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 09:19 
Offline
Giving a Junior an order mark
Giving a Junior an order mark
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 3307
Location: West London Alps
That sounds amazing, Miriam - drabble, please? And might that be an environment with plenty of potential for CS-style weather-related disasters, too?


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 15:04 
Offline
Dashing off for your part in the play
Dashing off for your part in the play

Joined: 30 Jan 2004, 00:07
Posts: 1014
Location: Taiwan
There are several sets of kanji characters that can be used for Naomi, but many of them have the character for "beautiful" in them, others "truth". (Japanese gets a lot of mileage out of a single syllable, and names with the same pronunciation can have very different characters).

One thing I find interesting regarding names is the choice of English names made by people from Chinese speaking backgrounds - the popularity of names is very different than people from English speaking backgrounds. Most of the people I know named Winnie or Isaac are from Chinese families, for example.

_________________


Ring the bells that still can ring; Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything; That's how the light gets in
Anthem: Leonard Cohen



Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 15:08 
Offline
Sub-prefect!
Sub-prefect!
User avatar

Joined: 06 Nov 2007, 17:50
Posts: 3003
Location: in a world of her own
jennifer wrote:
One thing I find interesting regarding names is the choice of English names made by people from Chinese speaking backgrounds - the popularity of names is very different than people from English speaking backgrounds. Most of the people I know named Winnie or Isaac are from Chinese families, for example.


Is that because the sounds they make - or the characters used for those sounds - mean something good in Chinese?

_________________
to be nobody but yourself - in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else - means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.
e.e.cummings
http://stitchwords.blogspot.co.uk


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 19:17 
Offline
Deciding to learn Russian
Deciding to learn Russian
User avatar

Joined: 03 Jan 2010, 22:35
Posts: 2317
Location: Berkshire, England
Most Chinese people I've met who have taken an English name seem to have taken names that were more common a couple of generations earlier rather than now


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 20:38 
Offline
Giving a Junior an order mark
Giving a Junior an order mark
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 3307
Location: West London Alps
Same here - influence of past missionaries, or perhaps veneration of well-known people thought to have been wise/ influential? The main exceptions either have Chinese names (e g Bao), or (purely coincidentally, of course) CS names (Adrienne, Natalie).


Last edited by Noreen on 04 Sep 2018, 20:41, edited 1 time in total.

Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2018, 20:41 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7972
Location: Manchester
Last year, I met a young Chinese couple called Brian and Katherine - names that are very popular in my age group, but they (depressingly!!) were about 20 years younger than me. However, I was rather more bemused to speak to someone called Ethel. It's a perfectly nice name, but I associate it with my grandparents' generation.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 06 Sep 2018, 04:03 
Offline
Dashing off for your part in the play
Dashing off for your part in the play

Joined: 30 Jan 2004, 00:07
Posts: 1014
Location: Taiwan
abbeybufo wrote:
jennifer wrote:
One thing I find interesting regarding names is the choice of English names made by people from Chinese speaking backgrounds - the popularity of names is very different than people from English speaking backgrounds. Most of the people I know named Winnie or Isaac are from Chinese families, for example.


Is that because the sounds they make - or the characters used for those sounds - mean something good in Chinese?


I think it's mostly a matter of what sounds good - if they have an English name it's written in Roman characters rather than Chinese characters. For ESL learners there's also the matter of what can be pronounced - for a Mandarin speaker, you'd avoid "th" sounds and most ending consonants, as those don't exist in the language. Sometimes they pick a name that sounds sort of like their Chinese name, other times just a name they like.

For picking Chinese names for non Chinese speakers it's usually some combination of the sounds and meaning of the characters. My Chinese name emulates the sound of my family name, for example, but doesn't mean anything in particular (although it is easy to write, for which I'm grateful). My Japanese name is a phonetic representation of my name in Katakana. In both cases, these are actually legal names as they go on government documents. Japanese people would just use their own name in Chinese, with the same characters but a different pronunciation.

_________________


Ring the bells that still can ring; Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything; That's how the light gets in
Anthem: Leonard Cohen



Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Trials for the Chalet School
PostPosted: 26 Sep 2018, 20:48 
Offline
Receiving support from the form
Receiving support from the form
User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2005, 21:21
Posts: 641
Location: On the sofa
There was a Jewish girl in my class at school, who is now, so I gather, ultra-Orthodox, but back in the day she went to prayers with everybody else, attended RE lessons (known as "Divinity", for some reason) and, as far as I know, ate the lunches provided (she was a day girl). I don't remember whether she took a day off for Jewish holidays, but it was well over 50 years ago.... I do remember that when we had to write "When I was baptised...." and various things of what one's parents and godparents had promised, she was told to write "At baptism...." and put it in the third person.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 96 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 11:00

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group