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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 02 Dec 2017, 19:56 
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Madge says that Rosa will be delighted to have two little girls to look after. Obviously Rosa was ecstatic at having four extra kids to see to for the rest of the summer!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 03:54 
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Jenefer wrote:
Very few parents seem to visit the school beforehand. They tend to rely on recomendations from friends or chance meetings with the school.


Actually I meant in general, parents would normally visit a school before enrolling their child.

But it happens in the CS as well. As far back as the very first book, Mrs Stevens meets Madge before enrolling Margia and Amy and later on the Luigia and Bianca are only enrolled after their father visits. Lavender Leigh's aunt visits the school, even Mrs Pertwee makes an effort to visit the school as soon as she can and one of Rosalie's many tasks is to visit prospective parents and shepard them to the school.

Alison H wrote:
Madge says that Rosa will be delighted to have two little girls to look after. Obviously Rosa was ecstatic at having four extra kids to see to for the rest of the summer!


I love the way they do that!

But even now that happens. My friend has a nanny/housekeeper and is forever saying "yes, please feel free to bring your 13 children along. XXX would love to look after them!"

Whereas in reality, the younger children cry when parted from their parents and need to be handed back, and the older ones run around screaming and don't listen to her.

Back to Tyrol, I normally like the holiday books but this one is too 'bitty' with too many story threads that go nowhere - the letter they can't decipher and the box they find that they can't open and Prof Richardson vanishing into thin air.

And do people really agree to take on three unknown kids just like that? By all means take care of Roger's foot etc but that's very different from agreeing to be guardians/trustees for the foreseeable future.

True, Prof Richardson almost gave them no choice because of his behaviour (he was clearly prepared to just dump them) but he does talk to Jack. Surely you would suggest he make an effort to find some relatives or contact a lawyer to act as a trustee? Or agree to help out until Roger turns 18, after which he should take over.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 09:23 
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It would be interesting to track the decline of the plotline of kids making friends with random strange adults. It's a staple of earlier kids fiction, and I can think of examples easily up to at least the 50s. But putting it in a book would be considered totally irresponsible and dangerous now.

For the book in general -

I do like Joey's insistence on reassuring Mike when she comes to, early in the book. Jack is kind of scary in the first part, with his extreme anger at Mike, and the fact that Mike had to be kept away from him so he wouldn't (presumably) beat him bloody. How about putting some of the responsibility on Joey for overdoing things after a difficult childbirth? The boys being sent away is kind of sad. They're at boarding school in another country, and don't really see all that much of their sisters or parents, and Mike in particular has just spent his first year away. Then they come back to find their parents lavishing attention on the Richardsons.

I like the Richardsons, particularly Ruey. They're remarkably sane given the recent loss of their mother, the fact that their father cares nothing about them, and being pretty much alone in the world otherwise. And I agree that Ruey was amazingly sweet tempered in not smacking the others for their criticisms. The triplets are used to having Anna and Rosli in the background doing the practical work of cooking and cleaning, which leaves them them time to make things pretty.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 10:36 
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Joyce wrote:
Jenefer wrote:
Very few parents seem to visit the school beforehand. They tend to rely on recomendations from friends or chance meetings with the school.


Actually I meant in general, parents would normally visit a school before enrolling their child.

But it happens in the CS as well. As far back as the very first book, Mrs Stevens meets Madge before enrolling Margia and Amy and later on the Luigia and Bianca are only enrolled after their father visits. Lavender Leigh's aunt visits the school, even Mrs Pertwee makes an effort to visit the school as soon as she can and one of Rosalie's many tasks is to visit prospective parents and shepard them to the school.


I meant visit the Chalet School, the ones that do are in the area but most just enrol the girl and send her off to another country.

My parents did not vist my high school beforehand. My only visit was to sit the Entrance Exam and we were not shown around the school. That was the norm in those days, there were no Open Evenings with a talk from the Head and tours of the school with students showing all the marvellous things they do.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 13:27 
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There are a lot of references to the prospectus. People would have relied on that. Not that most of them seem to have read it properly!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 14:31 
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Would the usual 14 year old girl back in the days of Joey & Co have been interested in the "look" of a house? Nowadays in our appearance conscious times probably yes, but back then?


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 15:01 
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Audrey25 wrote:
Would the usual 14 year old girl back in the days of Joey & Co have been interested in the "look" of a house?
I don't know - some would, surely? Many, even then, wouldn't be any better at coping with it than Ruey, of course - and nowadays an author would probably be suggesting that the right person does the job, rather than dividing tasks on conventional gender lines.

I think you could certainly argue that EMBD does her best to encourage her readers to be interested in their surroundings, indoors as well as out - hence the detailed descriptions of rooms in New House, Gay, and Janie Steps In, and the unmistakable hints that surroundings can have a positive or negative effect on someone like Molly Bettany, who's convalescing, in Bride - or yes, to bring it back into this particular book, children leading a nomadic existence like the Richardsons.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 15:05 
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Audrey25 wrote:
Would the usual 14 year old girl back in the days of Joey & Co have been interested in the "look" of a house? Nowadays in our appearance conscious times probably yes, but back then?

Well if I judge by myself - I would have been 14 four years before the publication date of the book - then yes. I always had flowers in my room, usually picked from the garden.

And there are a fair number of examples in earlier literature of girls liking to have pretty things around them and "dainty" surroundings.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 20:49 
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cestina wrote:
Audrey25 wrote:
Would the usual 14 year old girl back in the days of Joey & Co have been interested in the "look" of a house? Nowadays in our appearance conscious times probably yes, but back then?

Well if I judge by myself - I would have been 14 four years before the publication date of the book - then yes. I always had flowers in my room, usually picked from the garden.

And there are a fair number of examples in earlier literature of girls liking to have pretty things around them and "dainty" surroundings.


Afraid I didn't. The only thing about a house I'd have been interested in at age 14 was what books were available. Come to think of it I still look mainly at the books! Oh and I should have been expelled from being female as I hated pink.

Agree about the comments re Len - poor Ruey has been left to look after her two brothers including feeding, washing clothes, making beds etc. The last thing she will be interested in or have time for is making the place 'pretty'

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 00:15 
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At the age of 14 all that I was interested in was the positioning of my few books. It was my mother who controlled furnishings etc and I had to share a room with not a lot of space with my sister. I do remember taking daffodils in from the garden when they were out, but that was when I was older.

Len and Ruey both came from homes with money for luxuries, but a lot of people had the bare necessities only. As others have said , although the triplets did have chores to do, Ruey would have had a lot more to do so was not concerned with the "dainties" or it might have been that she was but had got bogged under with day-to-day living in a time when boys were not expected to do domestic work.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 01:00 
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Lesley wrote:
Agree about the comments re Len - poor Ruey has been left to look after her two brothers including feeding, washing clothes, making beds etc. The last thing she will be interested in or have time for is making the place 'pretty'


I think that's the issue -Len does not take into consideration Ruey's different circumstances.

Len has a full-time housekeeper and nanny and even in the holidays when Anna is cooking and cleaning for the entire family and extra, the triplets don't help with the cooking or cleaning. Which astounds me. The triplets, Steve and Charles are more than old enough to help with the cooking, serving and washing up, but they don't! It's not even suggested they give Anna a hand.

To Ruey, keeping the hut clean and tidy would have been enough to do without bothering with 'pretty' decorations.

cestina wrote:
Well if I judge by myself - I would have been 14 four years before the publication date of the book - then yes. I always had flowers in my room, usually picked from the garden.


That's nice if you have that option. My father thought of the garden as a place to grow food and save money on buying vegetables.

Growing up, I never felt the lack of flowers in the house and my mother used ornaments and pictures to decorate. In fact, later on when I was working and could afford it, I bought flowers a few times for the house and realised what a waste of money it is. They are pretty but obviously don't last for long.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 08:26 
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It's just rude. You would not walk into someone else's house, especially someone you'd only just meant, and start criticising the décor.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 11:15 
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When I say "flowers from the garden" they were mostly wild ones - we didn't have the sort of garden with "proper" flowers, we had grass, uncut, and whatever grew in it. An old apple tree, so blossom at the right time of year, and daffodils in plenty in the spring as well. Everything else was what I thought of as pretty but I don't think a proper gardening person would have!

As far as buying flowers goes, once I had some money to spend, I have never thought of them as being a waste. They lift my spirits and continue to do so...

But then I guess we all have different priorities, once the basic needs are met. I reckon I save an awful lot by not buying many things people regard as necessary to a fulfilled life.

(That excludes dolls houses of course :D )

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Last edited by cestina on 04 Dec 2017, 11:18, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 11:18 
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I get a £3 bouquet from Tesco every week, and they usually last till the next week. But I wouldn't dream of going into someone else's home and asking why they didn't have flowers, or criticising their furnishings!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 13:14 
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You might be surprised how many people would, though...until fairly recently we had a neighbour who thought nothing of coming into our house and criticising our belongings. And no, we hadn't asked his opinion. Another acquaintance always wanted to know what things had cost and criticised the less valuable!


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 13:47 
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Noreen wrote:
You might be surprised how many people would, though...until fairly recently we had a neighbour who thought nothing of coming into our house and criticising our belongings. And no, we hadn't asked his opinion. Another acquaintance always wanted to know what things had cost and criticised the less valuable!


What lovely (actually very bad mannered) people.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 18:58 
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I wasn't particularly bothered about what I looked like at 14 years old, never mind my surroundings. I do think fresh flowers and house plants are nice, but my track record of keeping them alive isn't good. :roll:

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 19:16 
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I can remember having ornaments such as Wade Whimseys. Sadly I threw them away years ago - apparently they are now very collectable. They were of very questionable taste. nothing like the statuette of The Little Flower that Charles breaks!
I can't imagine Ruey packing them for the Tiernsee. :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 05 Dec 2017, 03:23 
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cestina wrote:
When I say "flowers from the garden" they were mostly wild ones - we didn't have the sort of garden with "proper" flowers, we had grass, uncut, and whatever grew in it.


Sorry! For some reason, I had visions of a formal English garden.

I guess I could have done the same and asked a neighbour for their flowers since she had a lot. But mum would have felt obliged to give something in return.

And the only wild area around me was bushland and lots of leaves rather than flowers. Maybe I could've done an Australian wildlife theme :D

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But then I guess we all have different priorities, once the basic needs are met. I reckon I save an awful lot by not buying many things people regard as necessary to a fulfilled life.


Exactly! I don't drink alcohol or particularly like going out at night to bars or clubs. But I will buy opera or theatre tickets without thinking twice. In the end, it's your money and, as long as it doesn't hurt anyone, then there's no harm in using it to enjoy yourself in your own way.

I once told a friend how much an opera ticket cost and he was shocked. Well, it was quite a lot but it was a special occasion and the performance was by the Sydney Harbour. And no more than what he spent nightly on wine!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: Joey and Co. in Tirol
PostPosted: 06 Dec 2017, 18:15 
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Len only mentioned making Roger's room a little tidier and pleasanter to make him feel better about being stuck in there because of his injured leg. She kept her thoughts about the house in general to herself. It's Con who suggests to Ruey that they could tidy the house.

Like cestina, I always have flowers in the house, either from the garden, when in season, or bought if none around, mainly because I love the scent around me, and they really do make a difference to the room. That hasn't changed from when I was quite young. And SLOC nurtures plants all year round in his greenhouse, so plants are always a fixture in the house, with Xmas cacti in the porch in December and January to welcome folk.

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