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 Post subject: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 00:07 
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Good evening and welcome to this week’s discussion thread: The Chalet School Triplets, first published in 1963 and covering the Easter term following Feud. The focus of this book is of course the Maynard triplets, who have a series of adventures and mishaps both solo and together. Notable events:

The book opens with term already begun, and Con informing Margot that a letter from Emerence has arrived for her. Margot dashes off to collect it, and Rosamund Lilley comes up. She reminds Con that Emmy is now nineteen and probably quite grown up, especially after her tour of America with her parents. She also says she has heard from Joan Baker, who is more or less engaged to a boy from her secretarial college, much to Con’s shock.
Emmy has written to say that she will be coming to Switzerland at the end of May while her father goes to England on business, and proposes that Margot travel back to Australia with them for the summer holidays, returning to the Platz in time for the winter term. Margot is wildly excited at the prospect, but wonders if her parents will agree. She decides to talk it over with Len and Con as soon as possible.
On getting Len and Con alone to read them Emmy’s letter, Margot asks them to back her up when she makes her case to Jo and Jack about being allowed to go on the trip, and after thinking it over, they both agree.
However, this turns out to be unnecessary, as Mrs Hope writes to Jo herself to invite Margot, and Jo comes to the school to consult Miss Annersley on what Mr and Mrs Hope are like, as she knows very little about them. When the Head points out that the Russells are in Sydney anyway to keep an eye on Margot, Jo agrees to the idea.
The triplets are sent for, and Margot is thrilled when she is told that, as long as she doesn’t slack on her work and the Hopes are willing to wait for her until school finishes for the summer, she can go to Australia.
The next afternoon, the girls are allowed out to ski, and Con spends most of her time coaching a timid new girl, Michelle Cabràn, before Miss Ferrars takes over and sends her off to join Len and the others.
A fresh snowstorm blows up very quickly and the recall whistle is blown. Len and Con take Michelle between them and join the end of the line of girls heading back to the school, but the storm comes up so quickly that they soon lose the others and only make it back to the school after a long, blind struggle through the snow, at which point all three pass out with exhaustion.
The blizzard ends up being one of the worst in recent memory, causing havoc across Switzerland and cutting off various areas. Michelle develops a streaming cold following her adventure in the snow, and several nights later, Matey wakes up in the middle of the night with the feeling something is wrong. After an extensive search, she discovers that Con is sleepwalking. She recruits Miss Ferrars, Miss Wilmot and Miss Yolland, and they find Con and return her safely to bed.
The bad weather continues for some time, with the results that the Junior Middles, led by Jack Lambert, become revved up and restless. The prefects and Staff quickly become fed up of pulling them up constantly, and Jack herself is annoyed at constantly being in trouble. She hits upon the idea of talking to Len, whom she hasn’t seen much of so far this term, and on catching her in the dormitory one evening, asks if she can have a private talk. Len promises – in the hearing of the rest of the dormitory – that she will take Jack and her friends with her when she goes to deliver a parcel to one of the local pensioners.
However, on the day when it is fine enough for everyone to go for a walk, Len is unable to find any mistress to ask for permission to take Jack and the others with her, and is forced to ask Maeve to go with her instead. Jack and her gang spot the two prefects while out on their own walk with the rest of Lower IVb, and are furious that Len broke her promise. They sneak away from the main group, intending to cut down through the pine woods to the path where Len and Maeve are, and force Len to take them along with her.
Instead of sticking to the brook, the gang try going down slantways to cut Len and Maeve off, and very soon end up hopelessly lost. Mary Candlish stubs her foot badly, forcing the others to carry her, and it is dark by the time they finally reach the road, where they run into Gaudenz. After examining Mary’s foot and realising it is poisoned, he hustles them all back to school with scant regard for their weariness.
Meanwhile, the school has had search parties out looking for the girls, and Len, blaming herself for being the cause of their escapade, goes to the Head to confess, only to be told shortly that Jack and Co. only have themselves to blame, and that Len must stop being so absurdly scrupulous.
The result of the exploit is that Mary’s foot is damaged enough to put her out of games for the rest of the term, and the others are kept in bed for several days. Miss Annersley calls them all except Mary to the study, drags the full story from them, tells them it wasn’t Len’s fault she couldn’t take them with her, and orders them to apologise one by one to the whole school at evening Prayers for the worry they had caused. Len herself, bearing in mind the Head’s lecture, is very chilly to them, and the rest of the Junior Middles are disgusted that they are made to croc instead of ramble as a result of the escapade.
Margot begins with toothache, but is too afraid to report it to Matron, with the result that her temper grows steadily worse over the next few days. Eventually she decides to go to Matron, only to find she has gone to Interlaken and Matron Henschell, the only other Matron she likes, is in the San with a cold, although unbeknownst to her she is actually due back in school that day.
Len hears her gasping in pain in her cubicle and comes to offer sympathy, but Margot snaps loudly at her, and Len only just stops herself retaliating. Betty Landon, who along with her friend Alicia is the only other person in the dormitory, appears in the cubicle and tells Margot to stop shouting. In a blind rage, Margot catches up a bookend and throws it, catching Betty on the side of the head and knocking her out.
Alicia runs for help and finds Matron Henschell, and she, Len, Margot and Alicia carry Betty to her room. Jack is fetched and says Betty will need stitches and will have a sore head for a few days, but will otherwise be all right.
When the Head learns of the incident, she summons Margot to the study to hear the full story, and brings her up short with the remark that if the bookend had hit Betty half an inch closer to the temple, she would have been killed. She warns Margot that further incidents of that kind will see her expelled, then she tells her to sit quietly in the study for the rest of the morning and think about what she has done, and to ask God for help.
Word gets out that Betty has hurt her head, but Len and Alicia cover up the story as far as possible, and the incident is soon forgotten in the excitement of half-term. Betty tells the Head she was partly to blame for what happened by butting in as she did, and receives a sharp lecture on tact.
Half-term arrives, and the prefects go to Lausanne with Miss Moore and Miss Charlesworth. After spending the morning sightseeing, they go to a large department store for shopping in the afternoon. Len and Rosamund become separated from the rest of the group while making their purchases, and neither can remember which set of lifts they were told to wait at in the event they became separated. Len goes to the first set and Rosamund goes to the third.
While Len is waiting, a woman bumps into her and then disappears into the lift without apologising, and the next moment an alarm sounds and a security guard appears. Having noticed Len has been standing in the same area for some time, he disbelieves her story that she is waiting on the rest of her party, and when she goes to pull out her handkerchief, some stolen merchandise, stuffed into her pocket by the woman, falls out.
Miss Charlesworth explodes onto the scene and insists on being taken to see the manager with Len and an English woman who had witnessed the whole scene. When the whole story comes out and the manager realises Len is connected to both the school and the San, he is deeply apologetic, sends for coffee and cakes for the entire Chalet party, and orders a motor coach to take them straight back to the Platz.
Len is deeply upset by the shoplifting experience, and she loses her colour and appetite and has nightmares about it which worry the staff. Joey is told when she returns from visiting Frieda in Basle, and insists on seeing her, Con and Margot. She tells them a secret she is planning for the Easter holidays which succeeds in cheering Len up.
Shortly afterwards, on the day of the St Mildred’s pantomime, Len is delivering some registers to the office when she hears the phone ringing. She answers it, knowing the Head is busy with a visitor. The caller is Barbara Chester, breaking the news that their Fairy Queen and Fairy Nettlesting, played by twin sisters, have had to dash off home at a moment’s notice as their parents have been involved in a bad car accident. They have roped in Clem Barrass, who happens to be in Switzerland on a sketching tour, to reprise her old role as Fairy Nettlesting, and Barbara asks if Len will play the Fairy Queen as she is the only person who can learn the lines fast enough. Len refuses, pointing out she is far too tall for the part, and suggests Con instead, to which Barbara agrees.
A deeply apprehensive and dubious Con is marched over to St Mildred’s by Len and immediately starts learning the lines and rehearsing with Clem, with whom she has the majority of her dialogue. She is put off by the impatient manner of the girl playing the Beast, but when showtime arrives, she is a great success, although she vows never to do such a thing at short notice again.
A letter arrives for Jo from Mary-Lou to say that her mother has been diagnosed with TB by Sir James Talbot, with one lung practically gone and the other badly touched. She is to be brought out to the San as a last, faint hope, and Mary-Lou writes to ask Jo for help with dealing with everything and closing the house. As Rösli is away for the week for a family wedding, Jo asks the Head to send the triplets home to look after the babies so that Anna doesn’t have to deal with them on top of the housework.
The triplets set up a rota for looking after the babies and revising, and Jo writes to confirm that Doris Carey is very ill and Mary-Lou and Verity will almost certainly be motherless by the autumn. Mary-Lou has put her Oxford course on hold until the autumn, and Len believes that Verity will soon be announcing her engagement to the brother of a friend she has met at the Royal College of Music.
Con and Margot take the children out for a walk while Len settles down to learn some Spanish. She is startled when Jack comes home for lunch and realises that the other two have not returned. They eventually turn up and relate that they had met a strange woman who had taken a violent fancy to Cecil and refused to take any notice of their hints about having to head back, until Dr Morris had come past and rescued them. Jack and Len are surprised at the story, but Jack privately believes they are exaggerating.
Rösli returns that evening, and the next day Jack takes the triplets to Berne for a treat. On the way there, Con spots a woman who looks very like the one she and Margot met the day before, but she vanishes before she and Margot can look more closely. They spend the day sightseeing, before a call from the San to the patisserie where they are having Kaffee recalls Jack to the San. He drops the triplets off at Freudesheim on the way, and they are met by a sobbing Anna with the news that Cecil has been missing since sixteen o’clock.
Len takes charge and dispatches Margot on a bike to the San to alert Jack as the phone lines are down, and Con to the school to alert them. Then she and Con, soon joined by Margot, take Bruno and one of Cecil’s vests, and track her from the brook where she vanished right up the mountain to a small shelf with several chalets. Bruno picks up the scent again and leads them to a chalet from which Cecil can clearly be heard having a tantrum.
Con climbs up onto the porch and then in through a first floor window to retrieve Cecil while Len, Margot and Bruno confront the woman. She shouts at them and then lunges at Len, just as Jack, Gaudenz, Dr Graves and Dr Courvoisier arrive, having been alerted to Cecil’s kidnapping by the woman’s maid Bette, who had set off for the San to warn them.
The woman – Frau Schumacher – is taken down to the San for treatment, and when Jo returns and hears the full story, she explains to the triplets that she had lost her own little girl, Cecilie, to polio aged three, and had been struck by Cecil’s remarkable resemblance to her. She also reveals that Verity is engaged and will be married from the Platz in July at Doris Trelawney’s request, with Mary-Lou and the triplets for bridesmaids.

So, thoughts on Triplets? Lots of action to be had here, what with Emerence’s invitation, Len and Con’s adventure in the snow with Michelle, Jack and Co. ditching the ramble to go after Len, the infamous bookend throwing, Len’s shoplifting incident, Con being roped into the pantomime, Doris’s illness and Cecil’s kidnapping. The triplets are of course the stars of this particular show, how do you think each one acquitted herself? What do you think of the bond between them at this point in the series?

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 06:50 
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This is one of my least favourite books of the series - it's basically a series of over the top incidents strung together.

We've got Len and Con almost dying in a sudden blizzard. Then Con sleepwalks, and Matey's ESP detects it. Jack runs away to show up Len, and she and her friends get lost and injured. Margot nearly kills Betty in a fit of temper, and there's a coverup. Len is falsely accused of shoplifting. Con is pulled in as a sub for the pantomime because two of the girls' parents are critically injured in a car accident. Mary-Lou's mother is diagnosed with a terminal disease. Cecil is kidnapped by a madwoman, and the phone lines are down, so the triplets have to run to the rescue themselves. :roll:

The one incident I do like is Con and the pantomime. Con is mostly in the background, so it's nice to see her highlighted.

Then there are some of the disturbing little details. It's shocking for Joan to be almost engaged at nineteen, but Len being engaged younger and while still at school in a later book is fine. Margot nearly kills Betty in a fit of temper, and gets a lecture (and a cover-up), and Betty, who was quite reasonably telling some arguing sixth formers to pipe down, gets blamed for being tactless. The triplets get pulled out of school for an extended period to babysit.

The Jack and Len incident highlights the problems with that relationship. Jack isn't able to keep out of trouble without constant attention from Len. And, as is normal for Jack, when she feels slighted she way over-reacts and lashes out. Then Len
runs to Miss Annersley to blame herself for not keeping Jack out of trouble. It's not a balanced relationship, or one that's particularly healthy for either of them.

And why did they need to punish *all* the junior middles when only a couple of them misbehaved. Set Jack and the other to prim supervised walks while letting the people who behaved properly go on rambles.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 07:49 
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I find this a rather silly book, although I also like seeing Con get her big moment at the pantomime. I also find Con's attitude towards the expected role of women in CS-land interesting: she's shocked that Joan has got engaged so young (although she never says anything when both Josette and Len follow suit, which always annoys me - why one rule for Joan and another for them? Or maybe she just thought she'd better keep her mouth shut where her own family were concerned!), and she doesn't see that Mary-Lou should be expected to pack in university to babysit Doris. I forget if it's in this book or another one, but she's also the only one who expresses regret that Julie Lucy has given up her career plans to marry young.

Most of the rest of the book's rather OTT. Having said which, there are a lot of kidnappings in Tyrol, and they work ... but things just never work as well in the later Swiss books.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 16:46 
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Apart from the ridiculous Cecil kidnapping story line, I actually really enjoy this book and for me it's definitely one of the best later Swiss ones. It's one of the few books in which we are given details about going shopping and enjoying the world outside the school (though it's a shame they are still being chaperoned). I like (probably the wrong word to use!) how Len is victimised and how she has to deal with the situation. It's interesting to see that Joey and Jack give Margot permission to go tothe other side of the on holiday at the age of 16 - they're obviously very trusting, my parents would not have allowed me to do that! WOuld love to see a drabble of fill-in about this holiday :wink: As mentioned in previous posts I also enjoy Con coming to the fore; she was always my favourite triplet and felt it was a shame that she was always sidelined to make way for Len and having to put up with Margot's tantrums.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 17:07 
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I don't find a single episode in this book remotely plausible. It's a strung-together list of incidents dragging in the triplets in turn, which of course is the intended plotline, but it's not one I enjoy. If I'd been Betty's parent/guardian, I'd have made some mighty fuss.
I only have pbs, is there any back story to Clem after she left school? A sketching party seems such a twenties thing to be doing, and I don't recollect her being particularly artistic.
I hate the use of the word loony, too. Oh, there's so much I don't like here!


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 17:30 
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I don't dislike this book, though it does rather stretch credulity with multiple near-death experiences and so much drama. The biggest problem is that these are meant to be seminal moments for the Triplets and they aren't. Margot is still snappy and Con still dreamy in later books, with consequences. Len still can't handle Jack's possessiveness. Very little changes.

Con acquits herself well in the play, but it's absurd that Len, at 5-foot-8, is too tall to be a Fairy Queen, but Con, a mere one and a half inches shorter, is the right height. The difference is negligible. Given EBD points out a few times that Con is the smallest of the Triplets and built on a diminutive scale, I always pictured her around 5-foot-4 tops, maybe even shorter. I know that Joey and Jack are tall and so are Len and Margot, but 5-foot-6 isn't small.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 18:48 
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As a five-foot-nothing I too was astonished that Con was considered short but remember that EBD was notoriously bad at weights, measurement and all things mathematical. I know there's some mistake about grammes of sweets in some book and someone else being very overweight at 10 stone. I agree that there is much to irritate in this book including Len scolding Rosa for not taking a badly-behaved dog with her when taking the younger children for a walk. The shop-lifting story is at least original. It's noticeable that all the kidnappings/losing of children ( Sybil, Win, Cecil) are all the fault of the 'help.'


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 21:17 
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And Len tells Anna to "Pipe down". I really dislike that. I know she was stressed, but it's so rude of her to speak to an older woman, who has brought her up, as if she's a naughty little girl. There'd've been murders if one of the Middles had spoken to a prefect like that.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 23:01 
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Another thing that bothers me is that Con isn't told she was sleepwalking. At 16, she's old enough to be told when she does this and, in my opinion, is entitled to know. She's two years away from leaving for Oxford; it isn't fair to keep her in the dark about her own health.

Mel wrote:
As a five-foot-nothing I too was astonished that Con was considered short but remember that EBD was notoriously bad at weights, measurement and all things mathematical.


My favourite is when EBD refers to "several pounds" of Saint Bernard, which is about the size of a small cat.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 23:19 
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I'd imagine that a Fairy Queen can appear as whatever size and shape she chooses, anyway - they're very good at glamour!


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 00:10 
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I like reading about the triplets/Maynards and home life at Freudesheim so I quite enjoyed this book and agree it is probably one of the better Swiss books.

I only have the Armada version and don't know if there are many cuts from the original version which I do not know if I have ever read.

Like others I think some of the incidents are blown up from nothing and, like Joey Goes to the Oberland, it does seem to read more as a collection of short stories than a continuous novel.

The bookend incident is actually appalling. Were standards different back when the book was written - mid sixties? - or would it have been deemed as bad then as what it is now?

As well as Margot's terrible behaviour, Len also showed herself in another light over this incident. Scant sympathy for poor Betty who was blameless. As long as nobody goes near Margot when she is in one of her rages nothing else mattered.

I also felt sorry for Alicia who must have been very upset at what had happened to Betty and also concocted a cover story. Was this so the Maynards would not be upset further?

I wonder if Miss Annersley wrote to Betty's parents about the incident, if Jack who was on the scene spoke to Margot, if Miss A spoke formally to Jack and Joey about Margot, if anyone spoke to Alicia , if Margot apologised to Betty, if Miss A apologised as Margot was her responsibility at the time of the incident. A lot of questions.

I was glad Con got her big mention over the panto. EBD did not use her enough.

Instead of the triplets going home, could Anna not have looked after the babies, with Jack eating at the San and a school maid doing the housework? Joey had no hesitation about using them at other times.

I wonder how Anna felt, after the family moved to Switzerland, about most of the childcare being taken away from her and being given to Rosli and various mother's helps? Anna was then left with the cooking and housework. Was this her own preference? I am assuming, too, that the Maynards employed some sort of help from the Platz to do heavy work because Anna could not possibly have managed it all herself.


Last edited by Audrey25 on 17 Jan 2018, 00:13, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 00:12 
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whitequeen wrote:
I'd imagine that a Fairy Queen can appear as whatever size and shape she chooses, anyway - they're very good at glamour!

I would think that they appear as they want to be - or as their authors want them to be! Think Tinkerbell, any of Enid Blyton's fairies and the Fairy Queen in ' Iolanthe' is usually portrayed as being imposing ( to scare the peers!!). :reading:

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 01:24 
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I can easily picture Con going full out for an ambitious career and not being particularly interested in a husband and family. I see her as a journalist, eventually doing penetrating interviews of the rich and famous on TV. She'd have boyfriends, though, but not bring them home to meet her family. If she did marry, it would be later, and she'd insist on keeping her career and having at most one or two kids, if any.

Her perceptiveness would be quite useful there, and I think a few years away from the Platz and family roles would do a lot for her self-confidence, without being overshadowed by perfect Len, flashy bad-girl Margot, and enough personality for three people Joey. Her dreaminess, I think, is a way for her to escape from reality, and if she didn't need to escape, she could be very different.

And I also think that her sisters' quickness to commit to serious relationships before even leaving school and the Platz would push her further away from an early marriage. By the time they've left school, Len has committed to moving back to the Platz, marrying her father's protege, settling down near her mother and raising lots of kids. Margot is going to be a nun, which is an even more binding relationship in many ways, but with God, not a husband. I can see Con hitting university and taking to Oxford life with great glee, and a sense of relief at having escaped the Platz.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 03:55 
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Alison H wrote:
And Len tells Anna to "Pipe down". I really dislike that. I know she was stressed, but it's so rude of her to speak to an older woman, who has brought her up, as if she's a naughty little girl.


It was very rude and shows Len putting Anna in her place in a way which is out of character for hr.

AND the triplets scold Rosa for not taking out a large dog and three small children on a walk.

However, when they do the walks, there are always two of them to help and NO dog. So they are telling her off for something they don't do themselves.

Audrey25 wrote:
The bookend incident is actually appalling. Were standards different back when the book was written - mid sixties? - or would it have been deemed as bad then as what it is now?
...
I also felt sorry for Alicia who must have been very upset at what had happened to Betty and also concocted a cover story. Was this so the Maynards would not be upset further?


EBD MUST have known Margot deserved expulsion so she does mental gymnastics via a cover up and 1/2 blames Betty in order not to have to address that issue.

Margot's hysterical crying is meant to highlight her remorse and indicate to the reader the fact she deserves another chance. That would be fine, if not for the fact other girls are punished much more harshly for much lesser crimes. And this is AFTER the blackmailing of Ted. She's getting worse.

The cover up concerns me the most. Poor Alicia is shoved aside (and did she give Len a 'look' when Len essentially lies to shield Margot?) and both Ted and Betty are expected to be OK with seeing Margot every day afterwards.

And yes, I would say the cover up was done to protect the Maynards as well as the school. There's really no other reason.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 08:53 
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Joyce wrote:
And yes, I would say the cover up was done to protect the Maynards as well as the school. There's really no other reason.


It's a shame as it could have been a really interesting story line - does the headmistress expel the daughter of the founder of the school. Of course she wouldn't have, but there could have been some suspense along the way - Joey and Jack hauled into school, telegrams to Madge and so on.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 14:13 
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Jayne wrote:
Joyce wrote:
And yes, I would say the cover up was done to protect the Maynards as well as the school. There's really no other reason.


It's a shame as it could have been a really interesting story line - does the headmistress expel the daughter of the founder of the school. Of course she wouldn't have, but there could have been some suspense along the way - Joey and Jack hauled into school, telegrams to Madge and so on.


Joey not the founder. That was Madge.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 15:31 
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Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
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I know the bookend incident has been discussed ad nauseam, but it never fails to annoy me, especially compared with the treatment of people like Hilda Jukes, for accidentally injuring someone during a game organised by a mistress, Joan Baker, for listening in when she overheard two other people slagging her off, and the prefects in Two Sams over the ski-ing accident. It's very poor, especially coming so soon after Margot's treatment of Ted Grantley. A big part of the CS is that bad girls get their come uppance and repent, but Margot and Jack never do. OK, in real life, school bullies do often get away with things, but it's not meant to be real life!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 17:10 
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Attending the Fifth Form Evening
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Audrey25 wrote:
I wonder if Miss Annersley wrote to Betty's parents about the incident, if Jack who was on the scene spoke to Margot, if Miss A spoke formally to Jack and Joey about Margot, if anyone spoke to Alicia , if Margot apologised to Betty, if Miss A apologised as Margot was her responsibility at the time of the incident. A lot of questions.


Interesting questions! What is the school's policy for parental notification of medical incidents? I assume parents aren't told about every cold/headache/stomachache, but being beaned with a bookend feels like an appropriate event. I don't envy Miss Annersley having to write that letter to Betty's parents. Does she give a straightforward, blow-by-blow account? Does she say another girl injured Betty, but doesn't give Margot's name to protect her privacy? Does she give her opinion that Betty shares blame? What happens if Betty's parents write back disagreeing? Or if Miss Annersley says nothing and they hear about it from Betty and are angry?

In "House-at-the-Corner" by Enid Blyton, Tony Farrell tosses a bottle out of a window and injures another boy. Tony has a reputation for playing around in class, so this is the last straw and he's expelled; however, the headmaster says that the father of the injured boy threatened to sue the school if Tony were to stay on. Imagine the Maynards and the Chalet School in the same situation: Either Margot goes, or Betty's parents bring a lawsuit and all the negative press that entails.

jennifer wrote:
I can easily picture Con going full out for an ambitious career and not being particularly interested in a husband and family. I see her as a journalist, eventually doing penetrating interviews of the rich and famous on TV. She'd have boyfriends, though, but not bring them home to meet her family. If she did marry, it would be later, and she'd insist on keeping her career and having at most one or two kids, if any.


Have you read "The Chalet Girls Grow Up" by Merryn Williams? I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but it portrays adult Con as a modern woman: career-oriented, enjoying life in London, not keen to settle down.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2018, 18:44 
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Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
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Audrey25 wrote:
Jayne wrote:
It's a shame as it could have been a really interesting story line - does the headmistress expel the daughter of the founder of the school. Of course she wouldn't have, but there could have been some suspense along the way - Joey and Jack hauled into school, telegrams to Madge and so on.


Joey not the founder. That was Madge.


Well, yes, I should said "a founder member" as Joey was there on day one.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School Triplets
PostPosted: 18 Jan 2018, 04:09 
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Dashing off for your part in the play
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Jayne wrote:
Audrey25 wrote:
Jayne wrote:
It's a shame as it could have been a really interesting story line - does the headmistress expel the daughter of the founder of the school. Of course she wouldn't have, but there could have been some suspense along the way - Joey and Jack hauled into school, telegrams to Madge and so on.


Joey not the founder. That was Madge.


Well, yes, I should said "a founder member" as Joey was there on day one.


I see where you are coming from in that Joey was there on day 1 as a pupil but Madge was the founder and should be given full credit for this.


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