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 Post subject: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 01 Jan 2018, 23:18 
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Happy New Year everyone, hope it was a good one for you all. The first discussion thread of 2018 is the holiday book A Future Chalet School Girl, first published in 1962 and covering the summer holidays following Trick. We’re back at the Tiernsee with the Maynards for this instalment, along with fourteen/fifteen year old (it varies) Mélanie Lucas, whose guardian aunt and uncle have moved to Geneva for work reasons. Mélanie, a niece of Old Girl Jeanne le Cadoulec, takes an initial dislike to Ruey Richardson when she joins the family, but soon settles down and is thrilled to discover that she has been entered at the Chalet School for next term. Notable events:

The book opens with Mélanie having a row with her Aunt Amabel over being forced to leave her convent school and go to Geneva. Her Uncle Oliver has been offered a new job there, and as her guardians while her parents are in Brazil, they flatly refuse to allow her to be schooled in another country during term time.
Her aunt promises that Mélanie can finish the term at St Katharine’s as a boarder while she and Uncle Oliver go out to Geneva to set up, but after that she must go to school in Switzerland. However, Mélanie never returns to Kate’s, as she goes down with chickenpox several days later and is so ill that the doctor recommends she have a good two or three months of convalescence before going back to school. Thus, Mélanie accompanies her guardians to Geneva when they go themselves.
Arriving at Geneva, Mélanie is enchanted enough with all the new experiences to forget her woes at having to leave Kate’s, and writes an enthusiastic description of the places they visit to one of her friends. She reveals that Uncle Oliver’s new boss is Mr Embury, and that his wife is a close friend of Josephine M. Bettany, of whose books Mélanie and her friends are big fans. Later, while out for a drive with her aunt and uncle, Mélanie is thrilled to actually meet Jo, and also Frieda von Ahlen, whom they encounter walking with Mrs Embury.
Mrs Embury tells Jo that Mélanie has been ill with chickenpox and is still not fit, especially in the hot weather of Geneva. Jo decides to invite Mélanie to join the Maynards at the Tiernsee, but when she puts the idea to the triplets, they are unenthusiastic, as they had hoped to have Jo to themselves for the holidays. Jo tells them to go off and talk about it, and they reluctantly conclude that they can’t refuse and feel decent about it.
Margot wonders why an English girl would have a French name, and when the triplets tell Jo they will agree to Mélanie joining them, she asks Jo about it. Jo tells them Mélanie is half-French through her Breton mother. Len asks if the school has had girls from Brittany before, and Jo replies yes, the most notable of which was Jeanne le Cadoulec, of whom nothing has been heard since the war when the family went to Canada. She also tells the triplets that there is a surprise waiting for them at the Tiernsee.
Four days before the Maynards are due to depart for the Tiernsee, Jack receives a letter at Frühstuck that makes him laugh. Taking Jo into the salon, he explains that he was gifted a lottery ticket by the wealthy father of a San patient whose condition he had dramatically improved. The ticket won the fifth prize, and so he had put a proportion away in the bank to fund the children’s schooling, and invested the rest in a minibus for taking the family about in. The letter was to say that the minibus would be arriving the next day, just in time for the holiday.
The twelve-seater lime green and cream minibus duly arrives the next day, and is met with approval by the whole family. Jo proposes calling her Minnie, but is immediately shouted down.
Mélanie and her aunt and uncle drive up to Freudesheim the night before the departure to Austria and are introduced by Jo to the rest of the family. After Abendessen the triplets take Mélanie next door to show her the school buildings and gardens, but Mélanie is too shy and overwhelmed to say anything much.
The next day the party sets off for the Tiernsee. Along the way, Mike drops his handkerchief out of the window, Felix and Bruno are sick, and they narrowly avoid being hit by a tree falling onto the road. Jack is forced to stop at the nearest town to report what happened to the police while the rest of the party finishes the journey by train. On finally arriving at Die Blumen, the triplets are stunned to see that the surprise Jo had spoken of was an extension to the chalet.
The next day, the party goes for a walk around the lake, and stop outside the old school buildings, which have been acquired by the company which owns the new waterworks. The mistress of the chalet, seeing everyone staring in, comes out to see what the fascination is and immediately recognises Jo. It turns out that she is Irma Ancockzy, now Irma von Rothenfels, and is married to the manager of the waterworks. Jo is delighted to see her again, and Irma takes them into the chalet for a catch up.
The three Richardsons, who have been in England staying with the Rosomons, now come out to join the party at the Tiernsee, and as everyone is catching up on the news, Mélanie finds herself taking a dislike to Ruey, who has fitted right in with the triplets as easily as a member of the family. When they reach Die Blumen, she finds herself left alone for the first time while Len is helping Jo and Con and Margot are showing Ruey her room, and she begins to nurse a grievance against Ruey for causing her to be left out.
Mélanie takes Bruno out for a walk, determined to be alone. She tells Len and the others that she is going to Briesau to buy stamps, but when Len, who needs a new tube of toothpaste, walks around the lake to meet her, she learns from Fraulein Schmidt that Mélanie hasn’t been there at all. Two tourists come in then and tell Len that they saw Mélanie and Bruno heading for the Bärenbad Alpe, which the children are forbidden to go to alone.
Len sets off after Mélanie and finds her outside the Bärenbad Gasthaus, looking at the view and paying no attention to the fact that a thunderstorm is fast approaching. Mélanie, who is terrified of thunder, is recalled to her senses. They start back at once, and are nearly at Die Blumen when Bruno escapes the makeshift lead Len has made and runs off home alone. Jack then comes along and sees the two exhausted girls, and manages to get them home just as the rain comes.
Once the girls have recovered from the ordeal, Jack hauls them into the study for retribution. Mélanie admits that she broke bounds and that Len only fetched her back, but Jack tells Len off for thoughtlessness in not stopping to phone and warn Jo where she was before setting off for the Alpe. He then sends her off and asks Mélanie why she broke bounds. Mélanie is too ashamed to admit that her jealousy of Ruey is at the bottom of it, and Jack warns her that she must promise never to break bounds again or she will be sent home. He also tells her that thunderstorms are nothing to be frightened of, after she admits that her fear of them stems from a story she heard as a child about thunder being God’s Voice warning naughty children and that lightning is the sword He uses to kill people who aren’t sorry.
The next day, the party goes on a trip to the Zillerthal, and Jo and Jack point out various landmarks along the drive.
On the following Sunday, Ruey gets Len alone and asks if she can think of anything she may have done to upset Mélanie, as she has noticed how the latter has taken a clear dislike to her and has been barely civil since the moment they met. Len can’t think of any particular incidents, but guesses that Mélanie may be jealous of how Ruey is one of the family while she herself is only a visitor. As Jo has told her that Mélanie will be going to the CS next term and will in all likelihood be in Ruey’s form, she is sorry that the girls are not friends. She advises Ruey to ask Mélanie point-blank about it, and to do it soon, before Jo or Jack are forced to step in.
Mélanie, meanwhile, is reading alone in the boathouse, but soon begins to feel lonely. She starts up with the intention of asking Len to join her, but Jo comes by just then and advises her not to interrupt Len, who is grappling with her holiday task. She advises Mélanie to ask Ruey to join her instead, knowing full well all about Mélanie’s dislike of Ruey and intending to put a stop to it if possible.
Knowing that there was a pointed hint underneath Jo’s advice, Mélanie grudgingly asks Ruey to join her, and they take the Tub boat out onto the lake. After a heated exchange, Ruey breaks down Mélanie’s resentment when she explains about the events of the previous summer, and how she and her brothers are considered fully part of the Maynard family, not just wards. Mélanie, deeply sorry to hear how alone the Richardsons are in the world, apologises and asks to be friends, much to Ruey’s relief.
That evening, Jo does the round of the bedrooms and finds Len sitting up, wanting a talk. She confides she is worried that, as she will be in VIb next term, she will be made a sub-prefect, a responsibility she doesn’t yet want. She points out that she isn’t yet sixteen, and that there are plenty of older girls who could do just as well. She asks Jo to ask the Head to leave off appointing her at least until next year. Jo agrees to ask, but warns that the Head may not listen to her.
The next day, most of the party head down to Innsbruck on various errands, leaving only Con and the three youngest at home. Con looks after the babies for the morning, then Anna and Rösli take over so that she can pay a visit to Irma at the Chalet to learn lacework. Some visitors arrive, and Irma goes to play hostess, asking Con to set out Kaffee for them both if she does not return immediately.
Con goes upstairs to seek a tablecloth and napkins as bidden, and opens various doors on the landing looking for the right cupboard. Upon opening one, she receives a shock when she is doused in what turns out to be Irma’s blackcurrant wine, the corks of which have popped out with the heat. Irma is horrified and rushes to help Con into a bath and to send her children’s Mamsell round to Die Blumen for fresh clothes, but when Jo arrives back and is told about it, she merely wonders how she can work the incident into her next book.
The party makes a trip to Kufstein, and on the journey there, Jo informs Mélanie that she will be staying with them until they all return to the Platz in September, as her aunt says the heat in Montreux, to which they have now relocated, would be bad for her. She also tells Mélanie that she will be going to the CS next term, to her delight. Roddy also causes a sensation by announcing his intention to go to New Zealand to take up sheep farming, as he has made a contact there who will take him on as an apprentice, although Jack tells him he won’t be going anywhere until he has made enquiries about it.
After spending the day at Kufstein and the Pfrillsee, Jack decides to drive back to the Tiernsee by a different route. As they are going along a narrow lane, a car comes roaring towards them at eighty miles an hour and forces Jack to steer Minnie into the ditch to avoid a head-on collision. After he and the other driver have a swearing match, Jo intervenes and tells them both off, while in the background Mélanie, Felix and Felicity throw up with fright. In the end, they are unable to get Minnie back out of the ditch and have to return to the Tiernsee by train and then hired car, while Minnie remains at Kufstein for a week being repaired.
September arrives, and the guests at the Tiernsee begin to thin out as the season ends. Meanwhile, news comes that Daisy Rosomon has had a daughter, Mary Margaret, and Miss Annersley writes to Jo with the news that the building work at the school has been completed, and that there will be over four hundred girls this term. St Nicholas will be moved into the new building, and the old building has been divided up into flats for Herr Laubach, Mr and Miss Denny, and a spare for visitors.
Jo and the girls go to tea with Irma, and while talking, Mélanie makes a gesture with her hands that reminds Irma of Jeanne le Cadoulec. Mélanie replies that she had a Tante Jeanne, her mother’s youngest sister, who was drowned while on a ship to America which was lost. She says that her mother never talks about that time as her three year old son died and two of her brothers died while fighting with the Free French, and the family chateau was burnt down in an air raid. Although saddened to hear of Jeanne’s fate, Jo resolves to write to Mélanie’s mother about her, and finds that Mrs Lucas is glad to hear that the CS will keep Jeanne’s memory alive.
The day before everyone is set to leave the Tiernsee, Jo announces various items of news to her family: Vanna Ozanne is getting married to a fruit farmer out in Indiana; Nancy Chester is engaged to a doctor at her hospital; Julie Lucy is engaged to a housemaster at her brother Barney’s school; Kitten Lucy is joining the CS at the Platz; Paul Chester is going to be a junior master at the Maynard boys’ school, and Robin is moving to a convent in the south of France.
They decide to spend the last day paying a visit to the chalet the Richardsons had stayed in the previous summer. When they arrive there and look inside, however, they find that whoever lived in it last had obviously left in a great hurry, with mouldy food left lying on the table and the furniture in great disarray. A worried Jo sends Roger and Len to phone Jack and find out who the owners are to let them know.
The housing agent and a policeman come up to investigate, and later on discover what happened; the chalet had been rented by some Polish refugees, who had escaped over the border in April and had been wandering across Europe ever since in the hope of reaching either England or America. One of the refugees, fearing that she had been spotted by an enemy in Innsbruck one day, had hurried back to raise the alarm and they had fled in the night, finally reaching England where they were granted political asylum.

So, thoughts on this holiday instalment? What do you think of Mélanie, her annoyance at being made to leave St Katharine’s, her jealousy of Ruey and her connection to Jeanne le Cadoulec? What about the various expeditions made? Thoughts on Irma’s reappearance?

Coming right off a fresh re-read, I have three words to sum up this book: So Much Filler. This is a rare occasion where I think the Armada treatment would have been welcome; chapters 2, 5, 6, 8 and 10 could all have been reduced to just a few paragraphs for all they actually added to the book, and I could happily have taken an axe to some of the other chapters with the pages-long descriptions about preparing food for the trips and dispensing with the youngest twins and Cecil, too. Mélanie is understandable but dull, the jealous-of-another-girl idea is getting seriously worn by this point, and frankly the whole thing just feels like Joey & Co. 2.0. On the other hand, I like this slightly better than Joey & Co. for two reasons: there's less of the in-your-face religious moralising, and Jo herself isn't as OTT and irritating as she usually is at this point in the series. I liked the bit where she had a go at Jack and the rogue driver for swearing in front of all the kids, for instance. :D And the story about Jeanne, although very sad, does have a glimmer of EBD in her prime, when she wasn't afraid to write about the harsh realities of war.

Overall rating: MEH.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 01 Jan 2018, 23:45 
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Happy new year :D .

I agree - this isn't one of the better ones! The number of coincidences involving relatives with CS connections has got silly by this point. And I know it's a plot device, but could Len really not have used someone else's toothpaste?! Not to mention the ethics of Jack accepting what turned out to be a very valuable gift from a patient :roll: .

I think the journey to Tyrol's the best bit! The boys arguing over who sits where, people feeling sick and Jack getting road rage are very realistic.

There are some other interesting scenes, but they aren't part of the main plot. Julie Lucy packing in her legal career to get married, and Con being the only one who has issues with that, is one. And Joey guilt-tripping the triplets in agreeing to take a perfect stranger along on their family holiday is another. She conveniently forgets that the Maranis asked Juliet and Grizel to stay with them so that she and Madge could have some family time at the end of the first term. And would Melanie really have wanted to go on holiday with all those strange people? The Melanie-Ruey storyline is just boring, though, especially coming so soon after Margot being jealous of Ted and Francie being jealous of Ruey.

I'd really rather have seen Madge and Jem, and maybe Hilda and Nell, join Joey and Jack at Die Blumen, and a lot of nostalgia!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 02:08 
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I do feel sorry for Ruey. It's only been a year since she was taken in by the Maynards, separated from her brothers for most of the year, and started boarding school in a foreign country. And a few month since her father died. Now, she's on vacation and she has to deal with a random stranger who is being nasty to her for no good reason.

I also feel sorry for the Triplets. It's clear that they really want a family-only vacation - after all, this is the only big stretch of time they get to see their brothers. And it's also clear that they're kind of tired of their mother's habit of adding random people to family activities. But Joey happily guilt trips them into agreeing that Melanie can come. And as it turns out, they are the ones that are made responsible for entertaining Melanie, and chasing after her when she misbehaves, and figuring out why she's treating Ruey badly and what to do about it.

At the very least, Joey could have told Miss Annersley that she'd take Melanie for the latter part of the vacation. That would give the family some bonding time, and Melanie a nice break in the fresh air before school started.

Len also tells her mother that she really doesn't want to be a prefect, as she is only fifteen. Given that Len's main fault is being *too* responsible, it's too bad that she doesn't get listened to, rather than loaded with more responsibility.

The minibus thing is kind of convoluted. A grateful patient buys Jack a lottery ticket, that happens to win them a van capable of fitting 15 people, an excitable dog, and masses of luggage. That's an odd present, and an odd prize.

Regarding Jeanne le Cadoulec, the last we heard of her, in Highland Twins, her *younger* sister Marie is a student, and Jeanne is happily studying at London University, with an offer of a job at Cambridge working for a professor there.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 03:44 
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I thought that Jack won money when the lottery ticket he had been given came up. With the money he then bought the mini bus and put some money aside for the education fund. Especially when we hear about the huge extension to the holiday home, my reaction was typical that money should go to money.

I thought this was a poor imitation of Joey & Co although some of it was like a typical family.

Out on one of the excursions we are told about the cake eating competition between the boys and " younger" girls. I would love to know who the younger girls were. Felicity was only about five and Cecil three so surely not them and the other, older girls were all around the same age.

Len did not have a lot to complain about being made a prefect at nearly sixteen, when a year before Josette had been made head girl at the same age. When always being told about responsible Len and the clever triplets, it seems to go unnoticed that Josette was even cleverer and more responsible - HG at not quite 16 and leaves school at still only 16. EBD tells us her age the term before in Tricks and that it is her brilliance which has got her through the school so quickly.

As for Julie, in Three Go she had been portrayed as being a bit dim and Betsy the clever one. No way was Julie training as a barrister! Had she been rumbled as a fake and was this the reason she decided she must get married?!


Last edited by Audrey25 on 02 Jan 2018, 04:39, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 04:30 
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Audrey25 wrote:
I thought that Jack won money when the lottery ticket he had been given came up. With the money he then bought the mini bus and put some money aside for the education fund. Especially with the huge extension to the holiday home, my reaction was typical that money should go to money.


Yeah, he won the fourth prize which was enough to buy a massive van but put some away in the education fund. I was actually glad to see some reality seep in and the Maynards needing to save and budget!

But once again Jack's shaky ethics are on display. Should he be accepting any type of present from a patient's family?

Quote:
As for Julie, in Three Go she had been portrayed as being a bit dim and Betsy the clever one. No way was Julie training as a barrister! Had she been rumbled as a fake and was this the reason she decided she must get married?!


She might be one of those people who are not naturally clever but they study hard so they manage to get by.

But overall, I dislike Future. Melanie is a dull character and what is it about Ruey that arouses dislike in people? The poor girl could get a complex if this continues. But I like the fact Ruey makes the effort to find out what is wrong though - most people would think "well, I did nothing to you, so get over it!"

Bizarrely, the part I find most annoying (other than the "don't borrow toothpaste" thing) is when EBD makes an effort to be 'trendy' by saying the family sang 'pop' songs. Not singing along to the radio which would make sense. But just random pop songs.

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Last edited by Joyce on 03 Jan 2018, 03:53, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 04:50 
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Joyce, apologies for all the editings in my post some of which may have been made after your reply. When I am on here in the middle of UK night thinking I am the only person around, I forget that for lots of other people it is through the day and that I am not alone!

Happy New Year to everyone.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 16:23 
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I want to know how Vanna met a fruit farmer from Indiana. I spent four years in the U.S. Midwest and didn't meet anyone from Indiana, let alone a fruit farmer.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 18:31 
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One of my least favourite in the whole series, mostly because I don't like Melanie. I prefer Redheads to this, because I do like Copper.

I do sympathise with Melanie, though. I do wonder why no-one thought of writing to her parents to ask whether she should stay at 'Kate's' as a boarder, or go to Switzerland. Carola got told off for not writing to her parents about school, so I don't know why Melanie's aunt and uncle (can't even remember their names) should be let off.

Agree that it can't have been much fun for Melanie, still recovering from her illness and having to be uprooted from school and home, being dumped in the middle of a huge family of strangers at a moment's notice.

It annoys me that the dedication is to 'Phyll, who wanted a story about the people in the first books' (or words to that effect), and then EBD can't even get the Pfeiffens' name right!

I don't like Jack's lecture to Len on having to be a good example to all the younger ones. Poor Len really doesn't need to be burdened with any more responsibility.

I also don't like what EBD did to Jeanne le Cadoulec.

Things I do like -
The meeting with Irma. The moment when Irma tells Joey that she lost all her family in the war is very well done, and gets over the message about the losses of wartime.

Con's friendship with Irma. It's nice to see Con striking out on her own and developing a new interest that has nothing to do with school or home. Con doesn't get so much attention as the other two, but when we do see her, she seems to be quietly going her own way, having her own opinions, doing her own thing.

On the toothpaste - it doesn't seem to have been 'done' to use someone else's toothpaste in the past. The fact that someone used someone else's toothpaste is a major plot point in a Golden Age mystery. (Being vague so as not to spoil.)


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 19:14 
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JayB wrote:

On the toothpaste - it doesn't seem to have been 'done' to use someone else's toothpaste in the past. The fact that someone used someone else's toothpaste is a major plot point in a Golden Age mystery. (Being vague so as not to spoil.)

I don't know about that just being in the past. We haven't shared toothpaste since the children were very small and nor does my son's family now.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 20:05 
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It occurs to me that if the toothpaste was not a tube, as we now buy, but a tin with a block of toothpaste in, that one scrubbed the toothbrush across to get the stuff onto the bristles - this being the sort of toothpaste that I first remember in the early 1950s (Gibbs dentifrice) - then sharing it would not be good hygiene practice...

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 20:16 
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abbeybufo wrote:
It occurs to me that if the toothpaste was not a tube, as we now buy, but a tin with a block of toothpaste in, that one scrubbed the toothbrush across to get the stuff onto the bristles - this being the sort of toothpaste that I first remember in the early 1950s (Gibbs dentifrice) - then sharing it would not be good hygiene practice...


But doesn't Len say specifically she wants a tube of toothpaste? I didn't know toothpaste came in tins, though; that's interesting. I always assumed the girls used tubes similar to what we have today.

Perhaps Len preferred a particular brand of toothpaste. I've also wondered if she really meant to buy something she didn't want to mention to her father, like feminine hygiene products.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 23:34 
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I remember tins of pink toothpaste in the '50s, could well be what E B-D meant. Does it say tube in the hb, or is this maybe a change in the pb? (too lazy to go up and check!)


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 03:31 
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I know it was a holiday house, but surely there would have been spare tubes as there would be spare lavatory.paper and cakes of soap etc, etc. Surely the family did not have to buy their own toiletries/household supplies. Was Charles, for example, expected to trot off and buy his own toothpaste and no different for the triplets.

The toothpaste was obviously only an excuse but quite a lame one although I cannot think what could be substituted unless Len liked fancy soap or bath cubes - both more reasonable.

I seem to remember this discussion on another occasion.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 04:06 
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Audrey25 wrote:
The toothpaste was obviously only an excuse but quite a lame one although I cannot think what could be substituted unless Len liked fancy soap or bath cubes - both more reasonable.


Or why does she need an excuse at all? She's 16 and more than old enough to go off on her own and browse round if she wants to.

mynameisdumbnuts wrote:
I always assumed the girls used tubes similar to what we have today.


Yes, they do. There's a scene in Tom where a girl drops her tube on the way to the bathroom and Matron accidentally steps on it and all the paste comes out.

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 09:43 
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Joyce wrote:

Bizarrely, the part I find most annoying (other than the "don't borrow toothpaste" thing) is when EBD makes an effort to be 'trendy' by saying the family sang 'pop' songs. Not singing along to the radio which would make sense. But just random pop songs.


This bit always annoyed me, but because EBD says it was the boys leading the 'latest pops', as if it was ok for boys to like pop music, but not girls who are presumably only allowed to sing things arranged in four part harmony by Plato.....


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 13:55 
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It was an odd excuse to me. Obviously saintly Len couldn't go out to buy chocolate but what about stamps - surely she owes Tom Gay a letter?
It's a bit of a dull book and EBD was stuck for ideas having used them up in Joey and Co. A pity that poor old Minnie got smashed on her first trip.
Julie Lucy changes personality over the years. In Highland Twins she is the leader in Upper 11 then EBD realises that a Bettany must take precedence so Bride is set up to be a main character and HG while Julie is now 'the youngest of the prefects.' EBD still likes her, so she had her peritonitis story, kept back so that she can be first HG in Switzerland, but now 'frail' which is always a good sign of EBD's approval. Later we are told that she is small as her lacrosse stick is smaller than Betsy's who I always imagined to be elfin like Janie. Once bright and out-going, then not clever, then a trainee barrister then giving it all up to be Housemaster's wife.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 14:54 
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Quote:
EBD says it was the boys leading the 'latest pops', as if it was ok for boys to like pop music, but not girls who are presumably only allowed to sing things arranged in four part harmony by Plato.....

I always took it that the boys, at school in England, would have greater access to British and American pop music than the girls on the Platz. (Not that one got much pop music on the radio in the UK at that time. Brian Mathew on Saturday mornings and Alan Freeman on Sunday evenings, as I recall, and Radio Luxembourg if you could pick it up and tolerate the constant fading in and out).

Out of interest, I looked to see what 'latest pops' they might have been singing. In July '62 there wasn't a lot that was suitable for a family singalong. Don't think Joey would have liked 'Come Outside' (Mike Sarne featuring Wendy Richard). 'Do you Want to Dance' by Cliff might have been OK, or 'The Young Ones' a bit earlier in the year. Some of the biggest hits that year were instrumentals.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 15:12 
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:lol: :lol: That prompted me to look up the top singles of the summer of 1962. "Hey Baby": I'm not sure that "Won't you press your sweet lips to mine?" would really have worked for a Maynard sing-a-long. Or they could have hummed "The Stripper" - everyone knows the tune! Elvis Presley's "Can't help falling in love with you" is one of my favourite songs ever, but I'm not sure that that would have worked for them either :lol: . Shame it was a year too early for "Summer Holiday"!

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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 15:45 
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They could have had 'Wooden Heart' from the previous year. Joey probably knew the original German song, and could have joined in on that part.


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 Post subject: Re: Books: A Future Chalet School Girl
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 23:27 
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I assumed the toothpaste was just an excuse and what Len really wanted was Tampax or similar, but she wasn't going to say that to her father! One pretended, back in the day, that one's male parent was ignorant of such things....


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