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 Post subject: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 26 Jun 2018, 04:14 
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Today we come to Janie of La Rochelle, the sixth of the La Rochelle books, published in 1932. Unlike the previous books, there is no new central character; instead, we follow Janie Temple through her wedding and first year of marriage. There's not much high adventure (no accidents!) but two weddings, three engagements, five babies and one death.

For this book, I've moved much of the who's-doing-what information to the end, as there's quite a bit of it.

------

Janie and Julian are having a chat at the Ozanne's house, shortly before their wedding, when Julian admits to having bought a house. After teasing her a bit, he admits that he's bought La Rochelle, to Janie's delight. Some time later, they are unpacking in their new, freshly renovated home and sorting through wedding gifts, which include a lovely breakfast set from a mysterious giver.

We then skip ahead two weeks, to the day before the wedding. Guests are gathering, including the Athertons, Raphaels and Willoughbys, and we get updates on people's lives. In particular, Rosamund is engaged to Nigel, and they will be married later that summer.

The next day Janie gets dressed, and has a tender moment with her sisters. The wedding goes well, but Michael and Beth, the train bearers, get bored and decide to play horsie during the recession, and are swooped up by Nigel. After the wedding, Janie and Julian rush for the boat, for their honeymoon.

The honeymoon begin in Sark, a nearby island, where they're staying with an old friend and her husband. They make a last minute decision to stay on Sark for the whole time, rather than moving on to a new location as planned. They finish the day very happy. The two have a lovely honeymoon. They discuss Rex Willoughby and Con Atherton, whom Janie thinks are falling in love. Janie and Julian alternate between tender affection and vigorous teasing (descending occasionally to physical scrapping). While out one day, they hear the Athertons, Raphaels and Willoughbys, who are there for the day, not knowing the Lucys are still in the area. They hide, to maintain their privacy. They find out from their host, Fidelity, that the mystery china was the gift of Miss Matthias, a family friend.

After three weeks, the couple returns home to La Rochelle and their families. Pollie will be living with Janie and Julian much of the time, but gives them their first few weeks alone (aside from the two young maids, from the next door de Garis family). The next couple of weeks are full of various socializing with friends. The Lucys get a telegram; Cesca has just had her first daughter, Nita. Janie and Julian visit his father and maternal grandmother, who are living nearby (his mother has died since the last book).

The next day, Janie is having a relaxed day at home when Mrs La Touche, an overbearing and critical elderly neighbour, comes to call, and is less than impressed by the casual lunch she is served. She is there to ask for a favour. Her four adult nephews, the Clitheroes, are visiting, as their much younger sister is ill with scarlet fever, and they need entertaining. She is claiming Julian for the duty. Janie pushes back; Julian is busy at his job as barrister, and they don't want their summer claimed by the task. Janie does invite them for tea on Saturday, however.

On Saturday, the family arrives. The four men, all named after northern Saints, are Wilfred, Ninian, Cuthbert and Aidan; a military officer heading to India, a doctor, a university lecturer, and an undergraduate student respectively. Janie makes predictions about their appearance and personalities that turn out to be completely wrong. Mr Lucy and Gran show up for support. The boys arrive and turn out to be pleasant young men, and Julian agrees to some socializing, although not nearly as much as Mrs La Touche demands, while Gran has fun arguing with the latter, who she has known since childhood.

The boys come by one day and offer to help with berry picking, as Janie is making jam. Janie talks with Aidan, who is planning on becoming a priest, and working with his doctor brother in the slums in London. After tea, Cuthbert sees a picture Janie has of Maidie Willoughby, and is smitten, leading Janie to plot matchmaking.

Next week the Lucys head to England, for Rosamund and Nigel's wedding. They spend some time with the Raphaels and visit Cesca and her new baby. Heather shares some news; Allegra Atherton is engaged to a young man in her theatre company. The next day is the wedding. All the families have gathered, and the wedding goes off without a hitch. At the end of the day, Rex and Con get engaged during a walk in the woods, and announce it to the assembled crowd.

The Lucys arrive home, to find that Gran is ill with a bad cold. They decide to ask her and Mr Lucy to move in with them, and then discuss Allegra's engagement. Janie is worried over the elderly Gran, and is sad thinking about Mrs Lucy's death, and Julian comforts her. Janie and Gran visit, and laugh over Janie's recent mishap, making a cake with whiting instead of sugar. Gran shares a similar story from early in her marriage.

Pollie arrives in the fall, and has news about the Chesters; Peter will be taking over the local doctor's practice, and the family will move to Guernsey. Billy and Mike Ozanne come to stay, as Elizabeth is about to have another baby (which turns out to be twins, Vanna and Nella). The next day, Janie is resting in bed, and Billy has a naughty fit, which ends in peeling off the wallpaper, and a spanking from Julian, as Pollie doesn't approve of spanking children (to Janie's annoyance). They boys are told about their new sisters, and sneak out to go see them.

Mrs La Touche has arrived to quiz Janie about Maidie when the boys' disappearance is discovered. The adults engage in a frantic search through the village, and eventually find them. Mrs La Touche is helpful in keeping Janie from being too kind to the boys, leaving them in well-earned disgrace.

That fall the twins are christened, with another family gathering. The winter passes quietly, with the Chesters buying a house and moving to Guernsey, and Maidie and Cuthbert becoming engaged. Allegra comes for an unexpected visit, to confide her troubles to Janie. She's broken off her engagement, because she's jealous of the female attention that Hugh attracts, and the fact that he notices pretty girls. Janie helps her calm down, and see things more rationally, when Hugh himself arrives to see Allegra, and they make it up.

Janie has a visit with Gran, and they laugh over a recent laundry mishap. Gran reminisces about her life, Julian's mother, and her husband, who died young, and refers to the fact that she's going to die soon. Janie is distraught, but Gran comforts her. She dies that night, quietly and quickly.

The younger children have chickenpox, and Pollie manages to get one of her plays produced, though connections with Hugh Redmond. In May, Janie has a baby girl, named Juliet. Janie is ecstatic, and inclined to spoil the baby, but her sisters and Julian keep an eye on her to make sure she doesn't overdo it.

Julian has a serious talk with Janie. He has bought another house, a large property with a good yard. He explains that La Rochelle is getting too small, but Janie is reluctant to move on. They get news from Rosamund, who has had a baby boy, Harold (later Toby), which helps Janie accept the situation, as Rosamund and Nigel are having to put up with a small home. Julian decides to keep La Rochelle as a holiday house. The book ends with the move to the new home, Les Arbres.

------

Updates:

Julian is working as a barrister under Paul Ozanne. Pollie is at school in Paris.

Cesca is married to Mr Eltringham, and has a baby girl. Rosamund has been teaching at a boarding school, marries Nigel, moves to London and has a boy. Con studied at the School of Art and has been doing illustrating work in London; she gets engaged to Rex. Allegra has gone into acting, and is in a good touring company. She is engaged to a fellow actor. Jose is at boarding school and wants to be a teacher, Noel is at prep school and wants to go to Oxford.

Elizabeth has four children; Mike, bad-boy Billy, and twins Vanna and Nella. Anne has two, Beth and Paul, and the Chesters move to Guernsey.

Maidie finishes school in Paris and is presented. She is engaged to Cutherbert Clitheroe, an Oxford lecturer. Marjolaine is also to be presented. Peter and David are at public school, Tim at a Prep, Dina and Britta at St Peters. There is a new baby, Frithiof.

Heather and Cressie are leaving school in France. Heather is returning home to manage her estates (left to her by Alured Saxon), and the younger Shakespeares and Raphaels go to France in the fall.

-----

This is probably the most detailed view of a romantic relationship we see in the Chalet School related books. What do you think of Janie and Julian's relationship, and their process of settling in to married life? Any comparisons with Jack and Joey, who are also shown to have a teasing relationship? What about Julian's house-buying habits?

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 26 Jun 2018, 07:43 
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I do like this book, but some of it is completely mad. Janie stays in bed until about an hour before the wedding ceremony. Cuthbert Clitheroe decides he's going to marry Maidie Willoughby because he's seen one photo of her, and Janie starts going on about her converting to Catholicism on the strength of this. And Miss Matthias, whom they hardly know, sends Janie and Julian an expensive wedding present, anonymously.

I do really like the descriptions of romances, weddings and early married life, though, and of the circle of friends. We don't get much of that in the Chalet School books. It seems strange by modern standards that Julian buys a house without even discussing it with Janie, but times were different then, and I like Julian as a husband better than Jack Maynard with his doses.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 26 Jun 2018, 09:07 
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Julian's approach to buying a house - and telling his prospective wife about it - exactly mirror those of Gilbert Blythe.

To be honest, this book as a whole reminds me of Anne's early married life, with a lot of minor incidents related to growing into a family loosely woven into a story. Fortunately, though, Janie's first baby is allowed to live!

Its a nice book, but I have never seen any real depth to it.

I am never sure how the Clitheroe boy is expected to have fallen in love with a girl from seeing her photo - with Janie assessing it as being 'the real thing'! One can admire and be attracted to a photo, but I would think at least one meeting is needed for any kind of real love to develop - leaving aside the girl's own feelings!

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 26 Jun 2018, 19:43 
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My husband and I were in the process of buying a house the first time I read this, so I was amused and taken aback when Julian presents Janie with not one, but two. It's not just the presentation of these homes as done deals, it's how Janie apparently doesn't even need to be part of the process. She doesn't even sign anything. Would her name even be on the deed or is it just assumed that, as the wife, she is also a co-owner?

Julian's actions wouldn't fly with me, but Janie doesn't seem to mind, so power to them. They seem to have a fairly balanced relationship. Julian seems less "head of the household" and authoritarian than Jack. He also seems to indulge Janie without coddling her. If Janie fell into a packing case, I imagine Julian would pull her out, make sure she wasn't injured, then tease her. I can't imagine Janie being dosed and going for a two-hour nap. I like the more serious tone at the end of the book, where Julian obviously is thinking about the future and Janie must come round. It feels like a watershed moment -- La Rochelle symbolises the fun, lightheartedness and even innocence of youth, and now Janie is a mother, she must put that behind her and move to a new stage of life in Les Arbres.

I rolled my eyes a bit at the northern saint name theme -- why does there have to be a theme? Why can't they have ordinary names? -- but EBD seems to have gone in for that given the Shakespeare girls and then the Raphael daughters all being plant-themed H's. I think falling in love by photograph is a) impossible and b) a bad idea, but presumably Maidie and Cuthbert got to know each other properly before they got engaged.

The part where Janie is worried about Gran and sad about Mrs. Lucy's death must be EBD's pregnancy clue, right? Fear of losing family, melancholy because a mother missed seeing her son grow. You can be sad about those kinds of things any time, but something about it screamed "Pregnancy hormones!" to me.

Allegra's ditching of her fiance and eschewing her family for her close friend felt quite modern. That kind of jealousy, drama and support still goes on today and probably always will. I think Janie handled it well.

I didn't realise Vanna and Nella were short for anything, so I was rather intrigued by that and enjoyed seeing this small piece of the Chalet School in the book. Same with Juliet's birth, though it's a bit harsh that Julian thinks the baby needs to be "trained" at, what, four months old? Can you even spoil a baby at that age? Aren't they crying out of genuine need rather than caprice?

I like this book; it has an adult feel, but I can see why a younger person would still enjoy it. I went straight from The Maids of La Rochelle to this one, so I had no idea who the Willoughbys were except they must have some connection to Blossom Willoughby. And I was completely lost when it came to Britta, Frithiof and Sigrid. Out of Seven Scamps, Heather Leaves School, Maids and this one, this is the only one that doesn't feel like a standalone story.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 27 Jun 2018, 02:14 
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Miriam wrote:
I am never sure how the Clitheroe boy is expected to have fallen in love with a girl from seeing her photo - with Janie assessing it as being 'the real thing'!
Is the photo described? Maybe she's been photographed in some very telling pose which shows how aligned her interests or personality are with his - like looking active and fascinated at an archeological dig in the Orkneys, or something.


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 27 Jun 2018, 07:16 
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As far as I remember she was in a rather classic pose, sitting on a rock gazing out to sea.

Quote:
Same with Juliet's birth, though it's a bit harsh that Julian thinks the baby needs to be "trained" at, what, four months old? Can you even spoil a baby at that age? Aren't they crying out of genuine need rather than caprice?


It is now understood that at that age it is almost to spoil a baby, and one is givng reassurance that their genuine needs will be answered, but Julian's attitude was very much in keeping with the attitude at the time - and also appropariate to EBD's generation.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 28 Jun 2018, 14:41 
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mynameisdumbnuts wrote:
My husband and I were in the process of buying a house the first time I read this, so I was amused and taken aback when Julian presents Janie with not one, but two. It's not just the presentation of these homes as done deals, it's how Janie apparently doesn't even need to be part of the process. She doesn't even sign anything. Would her name even be on the deed or is it just assumed that, as the wife, she is also a co-owner?
Julian's just buying the houses is not all that surprising in the UK at the time, I'd say (save that a great many people, even those in the higher income brackets, rented property rather than buying it before the 1980s). We'll never know, of course, but it's quite likely that Janie's name wasn't on the deeds of La Rochelle or Les Arbres, because it wasn't the custom as much then as it is now. As somebody with no real income of her own, it would be considered that she didn't need to be part of the legal/ financial process of buying either house: Julian, as the breadwinner, would be the person doing the transactions with banks, estate agents etc. At least being in the legal profession, he probably had a will and would have revised it leaving the properties to her anyway.

I'm afraid there are still people around who think there's no need for consultation in a relationship, even when their partner/ spouse/ whoever isn't happy with it - I have a friend whose husband has always been inclined to make decisions without talking to her, most recently by buying a motorhome instead of paying off the mortgage. Apparently it was a one-off bargain that he had to close on pretty quickly, and they're having a whale of a time travelling about, but still...

Edited for clarity


Last edited by Noreen on 28 Jun 2018, 20:22, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 28 Jun 2018, 18:13 
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This is a lovely book from another age. Janie is so loved and protected and treated so gently.

She and Julian seem very well suited and don't seem to have any problems adapting to each other and married life.

Despite the fact that money would have been no problem to the wealthy Lucy family or to Paul Ozanne I liked the quite simple wedding and honeymoon. Weddings were simpler back then compared to some of the overblown, extravagent affairs nowadays.

Regarding the house, Janie was lucky in some respects getting it all handed to her on a plate. I know this was in keeping with the times and some women would have had their own money to also contribute to the house, but Janie seems to have had no input at all into the house - not financially, not in the choosing.

What if there had been some aspect of the house she had loathed? I know it was just a sign of the times. I think it was the 1980s before it became a requirement of law, for the house even to be in both names.

The fact Janie is pregnant is hinted at when the twins are born. First, the fact she is so het up by the birth and then the fact she is given food and burgundy at the Ozannes. Julian looks at her with "satisfied eyes" after she has dined and agrees that the burgundy is a good idea because he does not want her tired out. There is also her extreme tiredness the next day. All little giveaways!

I love the full names of the Ozanne twins. As for falling in love with a photo - why not? Not any more mad than other incidents in EBD books. Maybe he knew her in a previous life!


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 28 Jun 2018, 22:12 
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Audrey25 wrote:

What if there had been some aspect of the house she had loathed? I know it was just a sign of the times. I think it was the 1980s before it became a requirement of law, for the house even to be in both names.


Mildly confused by this as there is no legal requirement for the house to be in both names. I know of at least two married couples in their early 30s where the house is in one name only.


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 28 Jun 2018, 22:53 
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Our house is only in my name because I never got round to changing it - when we got the morgage he hadn't been employed at the one place long enough for his wages to be taken into account and we could afford it on mine alone


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 29 Jun 2018, 20:55 
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I enjoy the setting up house scenes in this book, with all the details about blankets and breakfast services, but I can't help feeling that there's a touch of wistfulness about them. By this point EMBD was in her late thirties and still unmarried, and I think she'd never had this experience for herself - student/ teacher lodgings aren't the same, and I think I'm right in saying that she otherwise lived with her mother (and eventually stepfather). This is perhaps her chance to say what she'd have chosen for herself. And it's definitely stuff-of-dreams that Julian has the money to do it all without Janie having to worry about making ends meet, as many newly-marrieds had to, though she obviously remembers how it felt to be poor when she says she wouldn't have let Julian buy her the more expensive breakfast set she really wanted.

Interesting that Pauline demands an all-white bedroom - very modernist for those days, and obviously not to EMBD's own tastes!


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 29 Jun 2018, 22:09 
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I hadn't really thought of that, but it's very true. That's quite sad :cry: .

I've just remembered that there's a conversation between Elizabeth and Janie, just before the wedding, which is very sweet, and reads a bit like something out of Little Women ... Janie is feeling nervous at the prospect of marriage and being mistress of her own home, and Elizabeth is giving her some

Quote:
"It’s a big change," Janie reminded her.

"I know. It means more responsibility, for one thing. As the years go by they will probably bring other responsibilities. But, Janie, you’ve only got to live a day at a time. God will give you the strength to meet each fresh thing as you need it. There isn’t any need to worry."


We don't really get anything like that in EBD's other books, or all the setting up house scenes, or a honeymoon - Janie's the only one of EBD's heroines who gets all this in print. Meg March and Anne Shirley get all this, but it's unusual for EBD's characters.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 29 Jun 2018, 22:38 
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Victoria wrote:
Audrey25 wrote:

What if there had been some aspect of the house she had loathed? I know it was just a sign of the times. I think it was the 1980s before it became a requirement of law, for the house even to be in both names.


Mildly confused by this as there is no legal requirement for the house to be in both names. I know of at least two married couples in their early 30s where the house is in one name only.


Sorry. I worked for an insurance company and from the early 1980s, when a staff member took out a mortgage, the house had to be in the names of both spouses.

We have only ever had mortgages through staff schemes and I assumed all mortgages were the same. Stupid, as I also know of cases where the house is in the name of only one partner or partner and a third party.

Edited to add - I also feel it sad EBD kitting out Janie's house when maybe it was what she wanted for herself.

I know we all make fun of Jack for dosing Jo and the fact she is sent to bed at the slightest ailment but maybe EBD wished she had soneone to look after her the way that Jack (and others) looked after Jo. EBD might have found out that getting fussed over is sometimes not good but the grass is always greener...


Last edited by Audrey25 on 29 Jun 2018, 22:52, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 29 Jun 2018, 22:45 
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Alison H wrote:
Quote:
"It’s a big change," Janie reminded her.

"I know. It means more responsibility, for one thing. As the years go by they will probably bring other responsibilities. But, Janie, you’ve only got to live a day at a time. God will give you the strength to meet each fresh thing as you need it. There isn’t any need to worry."


We don't really get anything like that in EBD's other books, or all the setting up house scenes, or a honeymoon - Janie's the only one of EBD's heroines who gets all this in print. Meg March and Anne Shirley get all this, but it's unusual for EBD's characters.
Isn't it? But then I think the La Rochelle books are quite unusual in some ways. I suppose EMBD was still to some extent writing to please herself (obviously with the proviso that the publisher accepted it too), but somewhere along the way it must have become obvious that the CS was a phenomenon, and one that she needed to keep going - hence all the later efforts to include what the fans wanted. There must have been times when it felt like a treadmill that she couldn't get off, though it was her own kingdom, so to speak, and lovely to have such a success, of course.


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 30 Jun 2018, 03:28 
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I like the gentle, day-to-day life feel of this book - no one needs to be reformed, no disasters or dire illnesses.

Viewing this as a wistful dream of EBD is a good insight. It does read a bit as if Janie and Julian are playing house for that first year - having all the fun, but without much extra responsibility, and no money worries whatsoever.

With Joey and Jack, we miss that early marriage stuff completely. The first year is completely skipped, and Jack is away at war, or recuperating, for much of the next four years. And Jem and Madge start out as a mature, responsible couple, between the San, the school and various dependants. Julian's taking care of Janie is much less overbearing than Jack's doses and days in bed for Joey. Janie is also more emotionally stable than Joey - she is sensitive, but better able to control herself, and more resilient.

Two things that puzzle, though. Janie starts out with two young maids she has to help/tutor in their jobs, but aside from the one year before her sisters married, she's always had servants, while the two young girls have grown up in a family where they would have been doing the cooking, cleaning, laundry, etc. And how did Julian end up wiser in baby-raising than Janie? He's an only child, while Janie has lived with sisters and their small children for years.

The not spoiling baby stuff is typical for the era. Babies were to be kept on a strict schedule for eating and sleeping, and if they weren't hungry, ill or dirty, were to be left to sleep (or cry) in peace. Current child-rearing trends have swung to the opposite end of the pendulum, so that not immediately picking up a crying child is seen as cruel.

In the Anne of Green Gables series, Gilbert picks out the house, but Anne knows he's doing so, and he's got a good sense of her preferences. It's also rented, not bought. With the second house he brings it up and they discuss it, and she has time to think about it, before they buy it. With Janie and Julian, they do get to start in a new house by themselves - I imagine a lot of young women in the past moved into their husband's home, along with their inlaws and various other family members.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 01 Jul 2018, 10:54 
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To be fair to Julian and Janie she doesn't meekly accept Julian buying a house without any input from her. She's quite cross about it. It's only when he reveals it's La Rochelle that she calms down.
On the other hand I think Julian only goes ahead with the purchase because it is La Rochelle and he wants to snap it up before anyone else does, knowing how much Janie loves the place.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 03 Jul 2018, 20:46 
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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 04 Jul 2018, 10:14 
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I like Elizabeth's comments about Vanna and Nella: she's going to send them to the Sacre Coeur once they're old enough and they will never be allowed to become bumptious and spoiled. And none of it, of course, is to be!

Out of Janie's daughters, I think Vi is the one who resembles her most strongly (in personality). Although perhaps it is just that we see more of Vi than the others.

And I'm going to commit the sin of saying that I much prefer Julian and Janie to Jo and Jack (what's with all the Js, though?!). They just seem so much more ordinary and I love the fact that they are so in touch with their families (while Jo and Jack just become part of the Chalet Family).


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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 05 Jul 2018, 15:37 
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JoJo89 wrote:
Out of Janie's daughters, I think Vi is the one who resembles her most strongly (in personality). Although perhaps it is just that we see more of Vi than the others.


I agree; Vi is fun-loving and charismatic like Janie, and we see her willing to "step in" when Barbara comes to the Chalet School.

Julie strikes me as more like Julian: friendly and gets along with people, but more of a take-charge person and, of course, drawn to the same professional field.

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 Post subject: Re: Janie of La Rochelle
PostPosted: 05 Jul 2018, 15:40 
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jennifer wrote:
Two things that puzzle, though. Janie starts out with two young maids she has to help/tutor in their jobs, but aside from the one year before her sisters married, she's always had servants, while the two young girls have grown up in a family where they would have been doing the cooking, cleaning, laundry, etc. And how did Julian end up wiser in baby-raising than Janie? He's an only child, while Janie has lived with sisters and their small children for years.
As to the latter, I think it's more a question of Julian making it clear that he doesn't want to have a house/ family where everything revolves around the child and its wishes: it does seem to have been a bit of a worry of the times, which perhaps came with the fact that after the First World War life was on the whole less stringently defined than it had been, and children were on the whole treated a little more like rational people.

I always think it's a very happy set of circumstances, Janie having Michelle and Bonita as her 'domestic asiistance'. It's nice for her because she would probably have felt overwhelmed with a lot of staff to manage, or very experienced and/ or older women, yet, as you say, "the kids" are likely to be well grounded in the basics and could probably run their own family home if their mother and Heloise were ill or away. But they don't know everything about how to run a household like La Rochelle, so it's nice for them, too, because apart from Janie and Julian being considerate employers, Michelle and Bonita are learning all sorts of other things that will be useful to them if they have to continue to earn a living and part company with the Lucys (as may have happened when war broke out again). Julian and Janie would eat some different foods, want their clothes and bedlinen changed more often, have more possessions (some unfamiliar) to keep clean and tidy and have different reactions to some events than the de Garis family. I suppose it's that old thing of class again - as in the next book, when Colonel Hayward calls to complain and Michelle leaves him in the hall (where he hears Julian's reaction) rather than showing him into another room to wait.


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