Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 10:59

Forum rules


Please ensure that all posts are kept impersonal. Any posts involving an ad hominem attack will be edited or deleted. Please feel free to express your views, but expect that others may disagree with them. Please limit the use of the :oops: smiley as far as possible. Please do not PM another user to argue with them; if this happens, please can the recipient contact a mod. Language of gentlemen, chaps!



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 65 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 12 Oct 2010, 23:39 
Offline
Order Mark!
Order Mark!

Joined: 23 Jul 2008, 23:36
Posts: 176
Location: Ireland
I love the aunt as well. She reminds me a little of Phoebe, but not so lucky. This is one of the times that the CS handles death with a great deal of sensitivity and compassion. Gay's protective kindness towards Jacynth is very well done too, and I always felt that Gay's sister-in-law provided a secure and loving family home for her.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 11:41 
Offline
Learning to stand on your own two feet
Learning to stand on your own two feet
User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2004, 21:57
Posts: 662
Location: UP NORTH
I like this book very much as it is a good, meaty read, especially the hardback. It has so many serious elements to it, the bus crash, Josette's accident and Auntie's death and dealt with sympathetically. Jo doesn't come out of it very well to me though, except for her sympathy towards Jacynth. She is too vocal early on about Miss B, not helpful, wanting to quit, dragging Nell back and fretting about her tea party rather than thinking about Madge and Josette. There is comic relief with Grandma though - a working class stereotype of course that EBD never used about the saintly Tyroleans. (I do wish that Grandma had put Nell in her place by asking for Earl Grey rather than the thick black Indian tea that Nell smugly provides).


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 13:06 
Offline
Cooking Disaster!
Cooking Disaster!
User avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2004, 17:26
Posts: 293
Location: London
Mel wrote:
...There is comic relief with Grandma though - a working class stereotype of course that EBD never used about the saintly Tyroleans. (I do wish that Grandma had put Nell in her place by asking for Earl Grey rather than the thick black Indian tea that Nell smugly provides).

The maids provide the tea, actually - Nell just orders it, and probably wouldn't have suggested how they make it. That was probably done on their own initiative!

I like this book a lot - as Mel said earlier in her post, it's very meaty, with lots of things happening which arise naturally out of the characters' personalities. Reading as an adult, I do feel EBD did make Miss Bubb too villainous, but if I'd read it as a child, I'm sure I'd have been cheering at her departure.

Doesn't Gay win the Margot Venables prize in this book as well, Joey having stated that she will and must award it this year (which suggests it wasn't awarded every year)?

_________________
"The purpose of satire, it has been rightly said, is to strip off the veneer of comforting illusion and cosy half-truth. And our job, as I see it, is to put it back again..." - Michael Flanders
Emma's book blog


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 13:28 
Mel wrote:
Jo doesn't come out of it very well to me though, except for her sympathy towards Jacynth. She is too vocal early on about Miss B, not helpful, wanting to quit, dragging Nell back


It hadn't occurred to me quite like that, but you're right - in a series that puts health and adequate recovery time above all else, Bill is pressured back to school by Joey's letter when it's plain she's still far from recovered - Matey notices how thin and white she is, and how many new lines she has, she's still in plaster for weeks to come, and of course she almost lost her closest friend in the same crash, and is still traumatised. By CS standards, Joey is behaving very irresponsibly in writing:

Quote:
You’ve had heaps of time to get over the accident shock; and anyway, you always were tougher than Hilda! Aren’t you on your feet again? Jem says you ought to be. The old idea of keeping people lying down till the break was completely mended is quite exploded now. ... But come! Come – come – COME! If you don’t, I doubt if there’ll be any school left for you to come to! ... My last word to you is C-O-M-E! Even if you have to be brought on a stretcher!


Yes, Madge is terribly worried about Josette, but she is the school's owner, and on the spot herself - it seems a bit much for Joey to reel off a list of complaints about Miss Bubb (including her overworking Rosalie Dene and making Grizel take lessons in her tea-hour!) which seem designed to make Bill feel there's no alternative to her returning. (Bill isn't even co-Head at this point, is she? Joey introduces her to Miss Bubb as 'our Senior mistress'.) I particularly smile at the way Joey calls on Jem's medical authority to argue there's no need for Bill to be lying down, because it suits her motives - when Jem is normally the first one to argue that people are irresponsible if they take less recovery time than their body needs! I can't imagine EBD letting anyone other than Joey get away with rushing someone's post-accident recovery! (Look how Juliet blames herself for not taking enough time to recover and going back to university too soon, and how everyone seems to blame Mrs Pertwee for postponing an operation in order to make some money for her daughters.)

From what I remember it's Bill who thinks she must tell the maids in advance to make the tea extra-strong for Grandma, before she actually arrives - maybe just in the hardback...?


Top | End
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 13:57 
Offline
Going to tea at Freudesheim
Going to tea at Freudesheim
User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2010, 10:52
Posts: 136
Location: Wales
Cosimo's Jackal wrote:
Mel wrote:
Jo doesn't come out of it very well to me though, except for her sympathy towards Jacynth. She is too vocal early on about Miss B, not helpful, wanting to quit, dragging Nell back


It hadn't occurred to me quite like that, but you're right - in a series that puts health and adequate recovery time above all else, Bill is pressured back to school by Joey's letter when it's plain she's still far from recovered - Matey notices how thin and white she is, and how many new lines she has, she's still in plaster for weeks to come, and of course she almost lost her closest friend in the same crash, and is still traumatised. By CS standards, Joey is behaving very irresponsibly in writing:

In fact, as I recall, even Miss Bubb herself is moved to ask if Nell is fit enough to be back at school, and the narrative is pretty clear that she isn't saying it just because she wants the running of the school to herself, but because she can see clearly that Nell is in fact pretty far from recovered!

_________________
The Life and Times of Me
"Real life is an illusion, albeit a very persistent one" ~ Albert Einstein


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 16:56 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7972
Location: Manchester
Sorry for repeating myself - I know I mentioned this early on in this thread and that I've been going on about it in AE as well! - but the way Joey treats Nell really hacks me off. We're always hearing about how the girls mustn't do too much work and need lots of rest - at a time when many teenage girls were working full time in factories etc - even though most of them are perfectly healthy, and yet Nell, who's suffered a serious injury, is supposed to drag herself off her sickbed and back to work just because Miss Bubb is getting on people's nerves. & all that "Haven't you got over the shock yet?" stuff, especially from someone who completely collapsed because the journey from Guernsey to England stressed her out, never mind being involved in a major accident and seeing her best friend almost killed, is really not on IMHO!

To add insult to injury, after lecturing Nell about how Your School Needs You, Joey then announces that she's packing in her own job there so that she can concentrate on looking after Stephen! I appreciate that Stephen's only a young baby at the time and that his needs are important, but it's a bit rich that Joey - especially bearing in mind that this is wartime and life isn't easy for anyone - expects Nell to put the school first and then does exactly the opposite herself.

Rant over :D .

EBD probably intended us to blame poor old Miss Bubb for Nell having to come back to work before she was ready :lol: .

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 17:33 
Alison H wrote:

EBD probably intended us to blame poor old Miss Bubb for Nell having to come back to work before she was ready :lol: .


I imagine so, but even so it's interesting that the suppsed villain of the piece seems more struck by how unwell Bill looks than supposedly sympathetic Joey is! I could understand it if Joey was shocked when she saw her, and regretted her letter immediately (because, in fairness, she hadn't seen Bill herself when she wrote), but I don't think she even asks how she is, she's so focused on how everything will be OK she's back and can restrain Miss Bubb. I could also have understood it if Miss Bubb was secretly thrilled Bill looked so weak, and was calculating how long she'd last before she relapsed - but her enquiry about Bill's health seems to be sincere. And Joey seems entirely impervious to even the few things stoical Bill says about it, like asking Joey to come up to her room if she wants to see her at Break, because she's so tired she needs to rest, despite having only come a short way that day.

And yes, difficult not to imagine the very different way in which Joey, five weeks after a traumatic bus crash and major injury, would have been coddled by EBD and all authority figures!

For some reason, I always imagined that Bill doesn't return until much later in the term, but when Joey writes her letter begging her to come back, it's in fact only a fortnight into term and into Miss Bubb's reign.


Top | End
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 20:12 
Offline
Order Mark!
Order Mark!

Joined: 23 Jul 2008, 23:36
Posts: 176
Location: Ireland
Alison H wrote:
To add insult to injury, after lecturing Nell about how Your School Needs You, Joey then announces that she's packing in her own job there so that she can concentrate on looking after Stephen! I appreciate that Stephen's only a young baby at the time and that his needs are important, but it's a bit rich that Joey - especially bearing in mind that this is wartime and life isn't easy for anyone - expects Nell to put the school first and then does exactly the opposite herself.

Ah, but Jo is a married lady, and a doctor's wife to boot, and she has children, so her needs must come before Bill's, a mere single woman. Seriously, it must have been demoralising for Bill to be regarded as some sort of tough old bird whose recovery time takes half the time of 'normal' women.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 13 Oct 2010, 20:23 
MJKB wrote:
Seriously, it must have been demoralising for Bill to be regarded as some sort of tough old bird whose recovery time takes half the time of 'normal' women.


Especially as we're specifically told in this very scene that she's only in her early thirties!


Top | End
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 15 Oct 2010, 17:19 
Offline
Order Mark!
Order Mark!

Joined: 23 Jul 2008, 23:36
Posts: 176
Location: Ireland
Cosimo's Jackal wrote:
Especially as we're specifically told in this very scene that she's only in her early thirties!
MJKB wrote:

When did Bill join the CS? I don't recall her being introduced in any book, she just appeared. Unlike Mollie Maynard, Con Stewart and Madge herself who are referred to as 'girls' on occasions, Bill is always a 'woman', perfectly capable, efficient and mature. Hilda too shares that fate.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 15 Oct 2010, 17:42 
MJKB wrote:
Cosimo's Jackal wrote:
Especially as we're specifically told in this very scene that she's only in her early thirties!
MJKB wrote:

When did Bill join the CS? I don't recall her being introduced in any book, she just appeared. Unlike Mollie Maynard, Con Stewart and Madge herself who are referred to as 'girls' on occasions, Bill is always a 'woman', perfectly capable, efficient and mature. Hilda too shares that fate.


She appears in one of the gaps near the start of the series, so by the time we meet her, she's not a new mistress. But you're right, if she's only early 30s in Gay, then she must have been, what, early twenties when she first started to work at the CS...? So, much the same age as Miss Maynard in her early days at the CS, but no one seems to mistake Bill for another schoolgirl, as the Stuffer and Maria do with Miss Maynard!


Top | End
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 15 Oct 2010, 20:05 
Offline
Learning to stand on your own two feet
Learning to stand on your own two feet
User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2004, 21:57
Posts: 662
Location: UP NORTH
In New she tells Jo, who is 18, that she is 30 making her 12 years older so she is Madge's age !


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 16 Oct 2010, 16:29 
Offline
Order Mark!
Order Mark!

Joined: 23 Jul 2008, 23:36
Posts: 176
Location: Ireland
Mel wrote:
In New she tells Jo, who is 18, that she is 30 making her 12 years older so she is Madge's age !
In New she tells Jo, who is 18, that she is 30 making her 12 years older so she is Madge's age !


I think that later got changed to 10 years older, which would make her two years younger than Madge. I can always visualise the majority of the CS staff as young women/girls, except Bill, Hilda and Mdle La Pattre. Oh, forgot Matron, one of those people who are born grown up.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 22 Oct 2010, 22:37 
Offline
Arguing with your guardian
User avatar

Joined: 29 May 2010, 11:23
Posts: 7
I've just re-read this and had forgotten how good it is. The incidental detail reminds me of the Tyrol books. We hear about the journey, the women porters and of course Grandma (who can't be all that old as she goes home to look after her own mother). Then there's Gay's pleasure in the walk in the early hours of the morning, which is reminiscent, but not a copy, of Grizel's own enjoyment as she starts her climb up the Tiernjoch.

I see that Jacynth describes Auntie's friend who went to the Chalet School, Gipsy Carson as the same age as Auntie, 'nearly forty'. Firstly, we know Jacynth is fourteen and that as a tiny baby she was put into 'Auntie's twenty-two year old arms'. So Auntie can only be thirty six or seven. That however may be nearly forty from her perspective. Secondly though - Gipsy was a contemporary of either Jo or Grizel. I can't remember which, so can't even be thirty yet!

I remember the first time I read this making a comment in the FOCS magazine when I was a member. EBD several times refers to Jacynth's home as Meldon House and at the end of the book refers a few times to the fact that she will stay with Gay's family while they have a holiday in Barnard Castle. (not the only time she mentions the town, I think the other time is at the beginning of Althea). My metaphorical ears prick up at these references. I grew up in Barnard Castle and my home has the name Meldon House carved on the gate posts. It's named after an obscure hill at the top of Teesdale (photo here http://www.walkingbritain.co.uk/walks/w ... to/327401/ )
so is not a name she'd come up with easily. I'd love to think she saw the house while visiting the town.

[wow - I just did a search against the name to check I wasn't giving away too much in the way of personal details and found a death notice in the Syndney Morning Herald in December 1886 for the sixteen year old son of someone from Meldon House Barnard Castle. The house can only just have been built then and is just a Victorian terrace, so that's a really strange feeling to see that]


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2010, 13:18 
Offline
Meeting the escort mistress
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2005, 10:12
Posts: 21
I'm re-reading this at the moment, just after reading a couple of other books set around this time (including "Nella Last's War" which I highly recommend) - anyway, I agree with the post above that there are some wonderful little details: I especially like the girl porters that are mentioned, which really add to the war-time atmosphere.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 08 Nov 2010, 21:09 
Offline
Order Mark!
Order Mark!

Joined: 23 Jul 2008, 23:36
Posts: 176
Location: Ireland
IAmZoe wrote:
I agree with the post above that there are some wonderful little details: I especially like the girl porters that are mentioned, which really add to the war-time atmosphere.


So do I. I always love details like the ones above that bring that period to life. I imagine those same 'girl porters' were kicked back into their womanly sphere after the war.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 14 Nov 2010, 02:47 
Offline
Meeting the escort mistress
User avatar

Joined: 09 Oct 2010, 20:41
Posts: 28
Location: Ireland/England
I have to put up some defence of Joey in the book - in looking over it again, there's a lot of missed out text, it's implied that matters in the school are much worse than the select bits we're allowed see (the page and a half missing in Robin's letter for instance), and it is shown that Miss Bubb is actually damaging the school badly, both in risking losing students and even teachers. Rosalie Dene is mentioned a few times as not being strong, and she is being consistantly overworked (although am not sure if Matron could step in there), and it's said at least twice that no-one in the school has the authority to do anything with Miss Bubb. It's certainly shown that the school is two steps from a mighty explosion, at the least, and that does no-one any good.

Joey's letter is strongly worded, and she could have been gentler with Nell really, but I can, in retrospect, see why her rabble-rousing writing.

Regarding her apparent about-face, it's made clear in the text that she does that on the spur of the moment, in a rage over Stephen's treatment, and I don't think she can really be blamed for it. She does calm down and back down on Nell's words, seeing that if Nell can do it, so can she.

About Miss Bubb herself in her words to Nell, I am inclined to read it as she is keeping an eye on the main chance, to be quite honest. She does see Nell as a threat, and works to neutralise it by implying that if Nell comes back to work, she risks her own full recovery. I don't really read it as her being overly-concerned. Someone like Madge would have been, but it's made clear that Miss Bubb is "not gentle by nature". This doesn't make her a totally unsympathetic criminal by any manner 'o means, but I think she was being more worried about the one person who makes for possible competition over an, after all stranger's, health.

Is Joey unsympathetic...hm. She doesn't get much time with Nell at the start, and her wild excitement/relief at seeing her again doesn't really have time to settle until the offscreen time later on, where she spends time with her. First she's in a tearing hurry because she abandoned her class and is relieved at seeing her, which is interupted by Miss Bubb, second time she's in a rage over Stephen. I think that's interptable both ways, really.

One defence of Miss Bubb - it appears that no-one really explains to her the connection with the San, or that the medical history of many of the girls is poor or indifferent. She's just going on her own past experience. She really does have no right to ride in roughshod though, and shows considerable disrespect to Madge, the teachers and pupils in her attempted reformation. She is damaging to the school, and Joey, on realising that no-one can do anything about it, makes a rather desperate appeal to the one person who can, and the one person whom she's known as a schoolgirl, and looks up to as an infallible ..hm...warrior :P Battleaxe, even. She likely doesn't really fully see her as a "weak" normal human, and her forceful writing shows it. Not right, but somewhat understandable.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 14 Nov 2010, 16:30 
Samaris wrote:
Miss Bubb is actually damaging the school badly, both in risking losing students and even teachers. Rosalie Dene is mentioned a few times as not being strong, and she is being consistantly overworked (although am not sure if Matron could step in there), and it's said at least twice that no-one in the school has the authority to do anything with Miss Bubb. It's certainly shown that the school is two steps from a mighty explosion, at the least, and that does no-one any good. .


I suppose one of the things I always think about the whole Miss Bubb episode and Joey urging Nell back is that it suggests EBD's conception of the entire staffing of the CS operates wiithout contracts! The things like Grizel being made to take classes over meal times, and Rosalie being given ten-hour days, and altering time off so that no mistress gets more than two hours off at a time apart from once a month, should surely have been specifically dealt with by the terms of their contracts, as should what rules etc Miss Bubb was allowed to alter, or things like whether a girl could be allowed out of school to see a relative being deployed overseas in wartime!

As matters stand, EBD writes as if Grizel, Rosalie and the others have absolutely no choice other than between working under Miss Bubb's draconian conditions or quitting their jobs - and all the language about authority and having someone who can 'restrain' or 'stand up to' Miss Bubb makes her sound more like a literal tyrant or an abusive parent figure than a temporary Head! I realise that the CS has always operated 'like a family', and that the mistresses feel constrained from outright rebellion by their strong, affectionate ties to Madge, but it seems to me that this book doesn't make enough distinction between professional teachers, and someone like Joey, who's helping out in an emergency, but, as she points out, not salaried or under contract. I'm not quite sure I understand the grounds on which Joey begs Nell to come back -

Quote:
If you and Jeanne could return, even if you can’t teach, it would be something! At least you might be able to make the lady hold her horses a little. The two of you should be able to manage that between you. I’d back you up – we’d all back you up…


Why can Nell and Jeanne be expected to do what other longstanding CS mistresses, Madge and Joey herself can't? Especially as it's, understandably enough, Madge, the school's owner, who fires Miss Bubb anyway - and nothing to do with Miss Wilson, who, for all her experience with the CS and personal strength and integrity, is still just a mistress under a temporary Head...?


Top | End
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 14 Nov 2010, 18:23 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7972
Location: Manchester
I'd think that formal contracts of employment would have been rare then, unless they involved some sort of articles/apprenticeship. They'd have had an agreement about an initial salary, and people in live-in jobs would have had an agreement about getting x number of days/afternoons per week and x number of weekends per month off, and - I'm just resisting the temptation to write a list of Factory Acts affecting cotton mills, which have got nothing to do with boarding schools!! - there were certain laws covering employment, but I doubt that they'd have had employment contracts as we understand them now.

Having said which, I know it can be difficult to say no to a stroppy boss but if teenage Daisy could speak out to Miss Bubb about being unhappy with her rules about exams and sport then surely a group of grown women could have banded together and said that they weren't being treated like that!

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: Change – Gay from China at the Chalet School
PostPosted: 14 Nov 2010, 18:28 
Offline
Meeting the escort mistress
User avatar

Joined: 09 Oct 2010, 20:41
Posts: 28
Location: Ireland/England
Cosimo's Jackal wrote:
Why can Nell and Jeanne be expected to do what other longstanding CS mistresses, Madge and Joey herself can't? Especially as it's, understandably enough, Madge, the school's owner, who fires Miss Bubb anyway - and nothing to do with Miss Wilson, who, for all her experience with the CS and personal strength and integrity, is still just a mistress under a temporary Head...?


Miss Wilson is Senior Mistress, as I understand, and does have some power in the land. If Hilda had been on her own when she had the accident, Miss Wilson would have taken over. Dollie is another head of some variety (Junior School head?) and Jeanne is head of languages. Basically, -all- the teachers with any real power or say in things (and probably all the dominant personalities) have been swoffled in one fell swoop.

Madge could deal with her, but Madge is not being allowed to know what's going on. Joey is a dominant personality all right, and, as far as I recall, has some financial stake in the school when it was being run as a family affair (may be wrong on that), but she's still "young, only 24", and is helping out as family, unsalaried. She has no real power. The only one that can really put a spoke in is our redoubtable Matey, and she does, within the limited sphere of influence that she has. She's backed up by the Docs, but again, limited influence.

Miss Wilson is really the only one of the four that actually can step in. She has the status, the influence, and is the natural figurehead for the staff to rally behind.

Regarding the school contracts, they do indeed seem to be lacking. But I rather suspect that that's just how things were - hence Unions. And even then, would they be working, legally/contractually under English laws regarding contracts (as a British school) or Swiss? I rather think that a) teachers are rather at the mercy of the head teacher, as if she were any other sort of boss, and b) if one of them made a fuss, Miss Bubb could (and would, as it's shown in the incident with Gwensi/Gay) make things very unpleasant for aforesaid mistress.

Minor ETA - crossposted with Alison - I'm suspecting the same. Also, there was a lot of upheaval regarding work and contracts after the world wars, so I think they may have been in the middle of the changeover from Edwardian era legalities to modern.

More ETA.
Some research later:

http://www.ameshistoricalsociety.org/contract.htm
http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/educa ... 4-100.jpg#
http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/educa ... 25-100.jpg
These are all a bit further back, latest being 1925-6, but you can see that there's no real mention of teacher's rights beyond being paid and being guarenteed at least so-many hours of work. Most of my references are American, and I rather suspect they are a lot stricter than UK, but still - untilthe 1970s, teachers could be fired by school boards for "immorality", including getting pregnant, a male staying overnight in the teacher's private accommadation (one case of a principle staking out the aforesaid teacher's house for a week to catch this!), for speaking in public meetings, and frankly, for a raft of other things, beyond mere "incompetance". The principal's word is law when it comes to influencing the school board. Cross him/her at your peril.

In Britain, women teachers only won equal pay to men in 1961, randomly, and only won the right to not be forced from their jobs on marriage in 1947.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 65 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 10:59

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group