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 Post subject: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 10 Jul 2011, 09:09 
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I was going to put this in Joey's Trunk, but it's not for a drabble, just a general query. Other than for the first edition, are we ever told anything about what goes in The Chaletian, or do we just assume that it was always the same sort of thing - school news, sports news, stories/poems sent in by the girls, etc?

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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 10 Jul 2011, 09:24 
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There aren't many references to it at all during the series, although we're often told who is the current editor. The magazine doesn't seem to change.

This is from Genius when Mary Lou submits a piece of music by Nina:

Quote:
For minutes there was silence in the commonroom except for the rustling of turning pages and occasional exclamations as the girls discovered whose contributions were in. This was always something that could not be known until the magazine arrived in all its glory. All contributions went to the editor who sorted them—generally assisted by any of the other prefects she chose to co-opt. When they had mulled over everything and made their choice, all they had picked out were put into one heap and taken to the mistress in charge of The Chaletian—Miss Derwent at present. They usually selected a good deal more than could finally be used for funds were limited and printing is costly everywhere, these days.


This is from Althea:

Quote:
“I just wanted to say that we want all contributions for The Chaletian as soon as possible,” Len said with a side glance at Con, who was the editor of that noble work of literature. “I know it seems soon to be talking about it, but last term quite half the contributions came in during the last week before they were sorted out. We’d like this term’s number to be better than usual, so please may we have any articles, stories, reports or poems and so on in good time for once?”


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 10 Jul 2011, 09:56 
I think that The Chaletian is on a list with (later) celebrating the Head's Birthday, and the School Council. They're set up or spoken of/shown, and then disappear from everyday life at the Chalet School.

Are there any other things that disappear like this?


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 10 Jul 2011, 10:03 
I've always found it a bit weird that the Chaletian prints Nina's musical composition, although presumably - from the descriptions of Plato's singing-lessons - more or less everyone at the CS could sight-read music...? (Though not sure how they would have learned if they didn't know how before they arrived, as Plato's lessons seem to assume everyone can sight-read - those bits where he makes everyone sing individually make my blood run cold, as, despite doing music for years, my sight-reading was never very accurate... :oops:)

We get a bit more info about how the selection is made and what's in the issue that appears just before the Sale in Genius:

Quote:
. All contributions went to the editor who sorted them—generally assisted by any of the other prefects she chose to co-opt. When they had mulled over everything and made their choice, all they had picked out were put into one heap and taken to the mistress in charge of The Chaletian—Miss Derwent at present. They usually selected a good deal more than could finally be used for funds were limited and printing is costly everywhere, these days. The mistress went through that lot herself, first. She, also, was apt to call on her friends for help and it was as well that some of the aspiring authors never heard the staff's remarks on their efforts!
When that had been done and the mistress had made her decisions, she summoned the editor, the Head Girl and the Second prefect and discussed everything with them. Finally, the sheaf that remained was handed over to Miss Dene who sent it to the printers and also saw to correcting the proofs when they arrived. The remainder was packed up and put into a closet in stockroom in case material ever ran short later on. It had happened only twice during all the years The Chaletian had been running and, warned by what had happened on the first occasion, everyone had seen to it that it never occurred again. Sundry school essays had had to be pressed into service then and even so, the result had been a very slim magazine.
Anyone who had had anything to do with the final choices was under bond not to tell anything to anyone and the girls generally awaited the arrival of their magazine with a good deal of impatience.


(What strikes me about that description is how little over all say the magazine prefect has, with a mistress having the final selection, and poor Rosalie having to correct the proofs!)

AS well as sending in Nina's song, Mary-Lou has sent in an account of a visit to Vevey, Jo Scott an article about Kenya (though I don't think we hear whether that was accepted):

Quote:
"Mother and Dad will be awfully pleased," Verity said, as she skimmed through it. "It reads better in print than it did in your scrawl."
"Shut up, ass!" was Mary-Lou's response to this. "Here's a short story by Betsy. It's a Guernsey legend, it says. What's next? Oh, a sonnet by Nan Herbert. I say! I'd no idea she could write like this! It's rather decent isn't it?"


What I remember about the first edition that isn't mentioned afterwards is having pages for 'Games notes' and 'Guides' notes'.


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 11 Jul 2011, 13:01 
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I think once the format has been decided on it changes very little. Very true to life with school magazines as far in my opinion. I guess the mistress in charge has to have the final say so that nothing potentially embarrassing slips in.


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 01:14 
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I may be making this up, but did the prefects and mistresses know whose selections were being considered? I seem to remember reading something about the girls not putting their names on their work so that the prefects wouldn't be biased when choosing which ones to include. I might be thinking of an EB book...


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 02:02 
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Cosimo's Jackal wrote:
Quote:
"Mother and Dad will be awfully pleased," Verity said, as she skimmed through it. "It reads better in print than it did in your scrawl."
"Shut up, ass!" was Mary-Lou's response to this. "Here's a short story by Betsy. It's a Guernsey legend, it says. What's next? Oh, a sonnet by Nan Herbert. I say! I'd no idea she could write like this! It's rather decent isn't it?"


Oh how times have changed. I can't imagine any schoolgirl from my generation ever being able to fully recover from the ridicule that would follow submitting a sonnet to a school magazine.

Either that or I went to a really rough school. :twisted:

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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 06:57 
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When I was at school, writing poetry was associated with Adrian Boswell, the uncool brother in Bread, and Adrian Mole of diary fame. Maybe it was something about the name Adrian :lol: . Anyway, no-one would have dreamt of submitting a sonnet to a school magazine, but times change :lol: .

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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 08:37 
lindsabeth wrote:
I may be making this up, but did the prefects and mistresses know whose selections were being considered? I seem to remember reading something about the girls not putting their names on their work so that the prefects wouldn't be biased when choosing which ones to include. I might be thinking of an EB book...


I was just looking again at the arrival of the first issue in Jo Of, and it looks to me as if only the fiction and poetry sections have unsigned contributions, because most of the rest seems to consist of 'Pages' for which nominated individuals are responsible - like Grizel is responsible for the Games Page, Gisela for the School Notes, and Bernhilda for a page on local folklore etc, and also Miss Durrant and Mademoiselle have both sent in signed contributions:

Quote:
But it was the Fiction Page which most interested the committee. At least ten girls had sent in contributions to this page, and four had been chosen by Joey for Miss Maynard to select from. As this had been done at the last minute, no one but she knew whose had been taken, so they were all agog to know. A groan of dismay went up as they discovered that the contributions had been printed unsigned, and only Jo and the authors themselves could know whose they were.


Quote:
The Poetry Corner came next, and the Chaletian discovered the interesting fact that the Chalet School contained quite a number of would-be poets. Like the stories, all the verses were unsigned, but it was a comparatively easy matter to name the writers.


I'm not quite sure why the poetry and fiction are printed unsigned - the selectors know who sent them in, so it's not a matter of blind adjudication for the sake of fairness. Nor does it seem to be a method of encouraging contributions from the shy, because everyone seems able to guess who the authors are, and Joey tells everyone that Amy Stevens is the author of 'A Rime' when asked!

But it sounds as if they changed their unsigned poetry contributions policy later on, as Mary-Lou and Verity exclaim about Nan Herbert's sonnet.


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 18:27 
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I don't remember any teasing attached to poetry when I was at school, which is surprising actually because if you weren't attached to an "in-crowd" you were liable to have anything and everything else made fun of! But I won a book voucher for a poem (not a sonnet as I don't think we knew what those were at that point!) in secondary school, and all the entries had to be pinned up on the notice boards in the corridor for a couple of weeks before the winners were announced, and nobody said anything other than "well done".

I'm now really surprised at the in-crowds for not thinking of that - they must have been slipping! :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 19:45 
We always wanted to write poetry at Secondary school but our English Teacher (I am so common. 'Teacher'!) wouldn't let us. I kind of see why not, but on the other hand children can be creative, even if they're not accurate in terms of rhythm and metre and so on.

We were allowed at Primary school and that caused a rash of poems about autumn, all of which rhymed 'brown' with 'down'.

Red, yellow, orange, brown,
Autumn leave come falling down.

That kind of thing. Nearly the whole class, it was. Thinking about it, that was probably why the Secondary School Teacher said 'no'. She couldn't face reading it ... I don't blame her!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2011, 21:13 
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It's a shame that it never discovered any more hidden talents. Plays for parts were given out without auditions and sports events weren't much of a big deal, but The Chaletian could've been a way for a quiet new girl to be revealed to be a secret genius :D .

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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 13 Jul 2011, 10:20 
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I once won a school Eisteddfod for a poem I'd written, and wasn't teased for it in the slightest. Granted, this was top junior rather than high school, but I also won a prize for a short story I wrote in high school, and again there was no specific teasing attached that I can recall.

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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 13 Jul 2011, 11:56 
I know The Chaletian is explicitly set up as an English-language magazine, because it's founded when the CS is very much an 'English' school, and when the continental girls are all terribly enthusiastic about everything English (Gisela even gets the idea from an English school story), and one of the first things said about it is that all contributions must be in English. But does it always remain English-language only? It would seem an eccentric notion once trilingualism, not 'Englishness', becomes the school's USP, and would mean that girls writing in a second or third language might be less likely to submit pieces, or to have them accepted...?


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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 13 Jul 2011, 12:02 
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It's never mentioned, as far as I know.

I love that brilliantly realistic bit in School of when we're told about poor Grizel being so worried about being pulled up for using poor English (and this is before Hilda's even arrived at the school!) that she's gone to the other extreme and written everything in a "This is the sort of English up with which I will not put," sort of way. It just rings so true (if I'm writing something "formal", I tie myself in knots over avoiding using verbs out of sequence or splitting infinitives!), and I can imagine a lot of other girls doing the same thing :D .

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 Post subject: Re: The Chaletian
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2011, 15:18 
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I always assumed that the Chaletian had similar stuff in to my old school magazine (an all girls school but not boarding), which had paintings by the girls, short stories from various year groups, yes poetry that people had written (some of it good, some frankly dire), reports on each sport, including match results, news of old girls etc. They still do pretty much the same in it these days from what I can tell.


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