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 Post subject: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 13 Feb 2017, 23:09 
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Reading Reunion and there is reference to Kaasuppe - a cheese soup. Google has given me a lot of German websites, but nothing I can find in English (my German being definitely substandard and not up to Chalet School expectations) and a picture search hasn't helped me much either.

I assume it isn't fondue, but can anyone explain exactly what it is (and maybe supply me with the recipe as cheese soup could be interesting!)

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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 13 Feb 2017, 23:23 
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Elle wrote:
Reading Reunion and there is reference to Kaasuppe - a cheese soup. Google has given me a lot of German websites, but nothing I can find in English (my German being definitely substandard and not up to Chalet School expectations) and a picture search hasn't helped me much either.

I assume it isn't fondue, but can anyone explain exactly what it is (and maybe supply me with the recipe as cheese soup could be interesting!)


I googled "Swiss cheese soup" and got several recipes in English, including one which is described as "fondue light". No idea how authentic they are though as I've never eaten Kaassuppe.


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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 14 Feb 2017, 01:09 
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I have always been very suspicious of this one since kaas is Dutch for cheese and as far as I can find out the Swiss-German is chääs.

But suppe is German, not Dutch....I suppose it could be EBD's take on Käse which is High German. Who knows?

Failing all else, here is an American recipe for cheese soup which I am very tempted to try now!

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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 14 Feb 2017, 14:54 
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cestina wrote:
I have always been very suspicious of this one since kaas is Dutch for cheese and as far as I can find out the Swiss-German is chääs.

But suppe is German, not Dutch....I suppose it could be EBD's take on Käse which is High German. Who knows?

Failing all else, here is an American recipe for cheese soup which I am very tempted to try now!



I did find it mentioned under the spelling "Kassuppe" as a speciality of Central Switzerland. Unfortunately, further research found that cheese in general seemed to be a speciality of Central Switzerland, and a multitude of recipes that were everything from milk-and-cheese-with-bread-mashed-in to vegetable or meat stock bases with cheese melted in, all claiming to be traditional.


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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2017, 15:22 
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Dommy Sci lesson
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My guess is that EBD wrote things down phonetically and hoped for the best when she put them in her books. We were always told at school that German was very easy in that everything was written just as it was pronounced. It may work in a classroom where everything is very carefully enunciated in Hochdeutsch, but it definitely doesn't work in the real world of regional accents and everyday speech. (I speak with feeling!) Didn't we have a similar thread about pancakes, where she'd also come up with an alternative spelling?

Anyway, it just so happens that I discovered on my last trip that a secondhand bookshop had opened in the village. I couldn't resist buying 2 antiquarian cookery books. I've looked up the 1790 printed one (the other is handwritten in something called Kurrent script), and guess what? There's a recipe for cheese soup (Käß=suppe). It's in Gothic script and I don't have time right at this moment to attempt a translation, so I've taken a quick picture. When I have a bit more time, I'll sit down and look at it properly, but if anyone else gets there before me, feel free!

Image

Edited to add:

Ok, I ended up so intrigued, I've attempted a translation. Like English, German spelling 200 years ago differs in places from that of today, so there's a bit of guesswork gone into it and I make no guarantees that I've got it absolutely right. I haven't yet been able to find out what a "Bierling" is, I've put a post on the village's FB group in the hopes that someone there might know. (I'm also not sure what a "Seidlein" is, I think probably a liquid quantity.)

Grate a 140 grams of good Edam. Pour on a pint of meat stock and a quart of water, so that it does not become too salty. Leave it to boil as long as there are still some hard lumps in it. Put it through a sieve, add half a quart of sweet cream and a piece of butter about the size of a walnut. Let it boil again and garnish it with pieces of fried bread. A little nutmeg and ginger can also be added. The cream can be omitted and 2 egg yolks stirred in instead.

This soup can also be made on Fast Days, with just water and no stock, but then a piece of butter half the size of a hen's egg is needed.

Edited again to add that I had a reply from one of the FB Group members explaining that a "Vierling" is the equivalent of 140 grams and a Seidlein a pint.


Last edited by Annied on 17 Feb 2017, 20:52, edited 3 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2017, 17:29 
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Excellent Annied - I have just sent it through to my German friend with an enquiry about Bierling and Seidlein.

Also, I have a feeling her husband can read Kurrentschrift so if you can put a picture up of it he could have a go at that one perhaps...

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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2017, 17:49 
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Dommy Sci lesson
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Sorry Cestina, I misled you. I've now had a look through the handwritten book as the headings aren't in Kurrent (I've edited my post to correct my spelling mistake!), so I can at least understand them relatively easily, but there isn't a recipe for a cheese soup in it that I can see.

My German friends were really struggling with Kurrent when I showed the book to them just after I'd bought it, so if your friend's husband can indeed decipher it, I take my hat off to him!

(It may seem odd to buy a book I can't actually read, but the handwriting is a work of art in itself and it was irresistable for someone who collects antiquarian cookery books.)


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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2017, 18:00 
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This is how my grandmother wrote and T has translated her letters for me....I am sure his grandparents, and possibly even his parents, wrote like that. He is now in his mid-eighties.

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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2017, 19:16 
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I've just come across another reference in Two Sams at the Chalet School:

Quote:
The Head had ordered previously and arranged for them to have a meal composed mainly of dishes peculiar to the Lucerne region. They began with Kässuppe or cheese soup.

"Queer flavour, hasn't it?" Jean murmered to her neighbour Mollie.

Mollie wrinkled up her pretty nose. "I've tasted worse in my time - not much, though!"


It is spelt differently and clearly EBD has changed her mind about it being nice!

_________________
You're scared of mice and spiders, but oh-so-much greater is your fear that one day the two species will cross-breed to form an all-powerful race of mice-spiders, who will immobilize human beings in giant webs in order to steal cheese.


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 Post subject: Re: Kaassuppe
PostPosted: 17 Feb 2017, 19:27 
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Dommy Sci lesson
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It could well be Kurrent, from what I've learnt, it would still have been the main form of handwriting taught in schools in our grandparents' schooldays. Here's a page from the cookery book here

(The picture really doesn't do it justice, possibly because the writing is paler and smaller in the book. When you see page after page of it, it's stunning.)


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