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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2017, 13:59 
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Getting all your textbooks for lessons
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Joined: 12 Apr 2004, 18:44
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Location: Southampton
I loved school, despite being a bit of a social misfit, and am in touch with my year group - we had an interesting reunion trip this summer.
However, I think there is probably a state/private divide here. i can't imagine my own children expressing that degree of love for their primary school, but as late as 2000 when I was teaching in a small independent day prep, several children (and not only girls) were in floods of tears on leaving day - even if they were proceeding to the associated private day secondary. I suspect it has to do with scale - even the smallest urban state primary will not have less than about 210 pupils, while the independent schools can be tiny. It's the family feel which gives rise the emotional response, I suspect.


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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2017, 21:53 
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Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
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Joined: 17 Nov 2005, 21:21
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My elder grandson is now in Year 2. In the summer term of his Reception year, he came out looking far too hot. His mother told him to take his sweatshirt off, whereupon he burst into tears and said he couldn't possibly as his sweatshirt had the name of his school on it and he was representing his school. Easily solved - his mother bought him new shirts and had the school name embroidered on them! But that is an ordinary state school.


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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2017, 22:06 
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Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
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Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
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Oh, bless him :D! I definitely felt more of a sense of belonging at primary school than at secondary school. My secondary school was fine, but it had over 700 pupils. My primary school only had about 100 pupils, and I knew everyone's name and they knew mine, and I knew their families because at that age we were usually dropped off at and collected from school by parents - which would have been considered the uncoolest thing ever at secondary school! Also, at primary school you aren't so bothered about being "cool" generally. In the first year of secondary school, we all turned up in school blazers and felt quite proud of ourselves, but, from the second year onwards, anything with a school name on it was a no-no, and plain black coats and jumpers (permitted alternatives to the official school ones) were worn instead.

I think it was because being into official school things suggested that you were a swot, a geek, a creep, and various other "undesirable" things :roll: :lol: . That never seemed to bother us when we were at primary school, but I suppose it's more of a teenage thing.

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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2017, 20:36 
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Discovering you have to be trilingual

Joined: 20 Nov 2014, 13:07
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My daughter attended our village primary school which has an average of about 80 pupils at any time. It was much the same when my husband attended and also when his parents were there. The next village to us has an average of about 40, and the one fifteen miles away where some friends live has about 25! It definitely makes for a cosy atmosphere.


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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 21 Jan 2017, 22:49 
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Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
Being a disappointment to Miss Annersley
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Joined: 17 Nov 2005, 21:21
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Supersal wrote:
My daughter attended our village primary school which has an average of about 80 pupils at any time. It was much the same when my husband attended and also when his parents were there. The next village to us has an average of about 40, and the one fifteen miles away where some friends live has about 25! It definitely makes for a cosy atmosphere.

My sister teaches at a tiny village school in Norfolk; I gather it is more-or-less Infants and Juniors (I suppose KS1 and KS2 these days, but same difference) with no actual year-groups!


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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 26 Jan 2017, 22:08 
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Attending the Fifth Form Evening
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Joined: 29 Aug 2004, 21:55
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Alot of the girls who say that they love or are proud of the school are among the founder members - at least within the first term or two. They had made a big contribution to the development and ethos of the school, and they were part of the CS as much as the CS was part of them. When jo runs after Simone in the pine woods to see what she was so upset about, she establishes the caring ethos of the school (and Simone establishes the habbit of miserable girls running away and being rescued and reformed!)

Particularly in the Austrian days, it was an unusual school - Gisela comments how the education is deficient, though the lifestyle is healthy. The mix of nations, and of different branches of Christianity would be far more unusual than than it might be today. Later, of course, the attitude to Nazism marked them out. It wasn't just another school, and and that in itself may have generated addtional loyalty.

But what I am trying to say is that they were girls who were much more involved in their school than average. I'vr been in a sitation where I was a founder member of an adult educational 'college' and twenty years later still feel more loyalty and connection to it than any other situation I have been in - partly because I helped to shape what it bacame. Pride (or love) comes more naturally for a school that one is so involved in.

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... Anna made up her mind for once and all that there must be something about the Chalet School that affected all concerned with it with mild insanity!


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 Post subject: Re: Loving Your School
PostPosted: 27 Jan 2017, 14:48 
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Coming top in the form
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Joined: 12 May 2006, 17:54
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I think I can safely say that no-one was proud of my school or loved it, although most people enjoyed at least some of their time there.

But I always find the 'we all love our school' thing very convincing in GO, partly because everyone always seems to have an excellent time, partly because I think if you boarded you would identify more with your school (although if you didn't like it I think you'd hate it even more) and partly because a lot of them spend longer there in terms of years. But mostly because if that is the 'cool' thing to do, most people will do it.

I remember reading a Babysitter's Club book where the school all the girls go to has what is called 'School Spirit Week' which seemed to me to be a bizarre thing. One of the babysitters is ostracized because she doesn't want to join in.


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