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 Post subject: Re: Joey in Eustacia
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2017, 13:08 
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Joined: 23 Sep 2004, 21:57
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Perhaps they should have arranged a visiting tutor to teach her Greek then she would have felt that her undoubted scholastic abilities were appreciated.


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 Post subject: Re: Joey in Eustacia
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 10:56 
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Maybe Eustacia was the reason that a change in school policy re specialising. As we get to Nina R, her whole curriculum is arranged around her future career.
Perhaps there was a 'de-brief' at some later point. But Eustacia was interested in 'boy's subjects' to add to her troubles, in a school that was aiming to produce a well-informed young ladies who could embroider, ready for marriage rather than a career.

Isn't this the first term for Joey without access to Madge's closer supervision. It's winter, Madge is stuck up at the Sonnalpe, very little visiting... does that make a difference to Joey's ott behaviour?


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 Post subject: Re: Joey in Eustacia
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 11:48 
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Even in later books, specialization seems to be mostly restricted to girls over 15 - until then, they're expected to keep a fairly standard course of study. And Nina's schedule is carefully arranged for practice times, but she still has to take languages and literature and history and maths and P.T. - I think she's excused from science and art.

Eustacia would have been a problem for specializing because most of her core subjects were very weak. She actually is put with the fifth for maths and classics, because she's very advanced there, but for the rest she's well behind her age group (the staff discusses it, and decide that it would be a bad idea to have her take remedial work with the third, socially). And Eustacia is mad because she thinks she should be placed in the sixth.

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 Post subject: Re: Joey in Eustacia
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 14:51 
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I never could understand EBD's comment that her classics would not have disgraced a 'public schoolboy of her own age'. Surely Eustacia should have been better than that?


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 Post subject: Re: Joey in Eustacia
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 14:54 
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Even in later books, specialization seems to be mostly restricted to girls over 15 - until then, they're expected to keep a fairly standard course of study.

Eight subjects to O Level, thus to age 15/16, was the norm when I was at school, and I think it was for School Cert previously too.

We were required to do maths, English Language and Literature (two separate subjects), French and one science - biology, physics or chemistry. We could then opt for three other subjects from those offered, and within timetabling constraints - I'd have quite liked to do German, but it wouldn't fit in with the other subjects wanted to do and was required to do.

For A Level, at 17/18, we dropped down to three subjects; that was when I dropped all maths and science.

The CS specialisation does seem to be a bit odd at times - I don't know why Jo was still doing maths and art in the Sixth, when she had no aptitude or interest in either of them.

Then in Challenge, Evelyn is said to be sixteen and to have done her O Levels, so she should be in the Sixth and specialising, but she's put in the Fifth with people who will be doing O levels in the coming summer, so will presumably spend the year repeating work she's already done. I can imagine how I'd have felt if I'd been told I had to do another year of maths when I thought I'd finished with it forever!


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