Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Lemon Biscuits & Liberty Bodices
It is currently 20 Aug 2017, 12:28



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 11 May 2017, 06:59 
Online
Meeting the escort mistress
User avatar

Joined: 14 Jan 2010, 08:12
Posts: 34
Location: normandie france
Just looked this up exemptions from 1942
Only women between 20 and 30 were called up
Women with children under 14 were exempt the list says legitimate ,illegitimate,step,or children adopted before 18 dec 1941
As already said teachers were also exempt


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 11 May 2017, 08:03 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7094
Location: Manchester
"In December 1941, the National Service Act (no 2) made the conscription of women legal. At first, only single women aged 20-30 were called up, but by mid-1943, almost 90 per cent of single women and 80 per cent of married women were employed in essential work for the war effort." (BBC website)

I don't know what the rules were when the mum had died and an auntie or grandma or sister was responsible for a child, but surely the same exemptions must have applied - what were they meant to do if they couldn't afford boarding school?! Even once Lavender was 14, Miss Leigh would not have had to go into the Armed Forces: she'd've been found a day job near her home.

EBD says some odd things about this. Robin says that they should agree to let Flora and Fiona stay with them as Jo might be called up to do war work otherwise, which is crazy - a woman with three babies certainly wouldn't have been expected to leave them.

The stats do show that most women became involved. Essential work would have included work which wasn't directly war-related but was still necessary. It was at this point that school dinners became common, because kids couldn't go home for dinner. And some workplaces have crèches. This is why I find it quite annoying that we don't actually see Madge or Joey doing anything, whether it was voluntary work or paid work.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 11 May 2017, 16:09 
Offline
Annoying your friends
Annoying your friends
User avatar

Joined: 08 Feb 2005, 15:50
Posts: 2080
Location: Cheshire
Alison H wrote:
The stats do show that most women became involved. Essential work would have included work which wasn't directly war-related but was still necessary... This is why I find it quite annoying that we don't actually see Madge or Joey doing anything, whether it was voluntary work or paid work.

But EBD couldn't include everything, so they may well both have been beavering away behind the scenes! :twisted:

My mother joined the ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service) after running away from home in Ireland. The laugh is they made her cook - and she couldn't boil an egg! But they certainly made a brilliant cook out of her! :wink: Even when my parents married in 1943, she stayed in the ATS, as Dad was serving in Belgium for the duration.

_________________
"When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not more of a pastime to her than she is to me?" (Montaigne)


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 13 May 2017, 20:44 
Offline
Playing Impertinent Questions
Playing Impertinent Questions
User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2005, 21:21
Posts: 589
Location: On the sofa
Alison H wrote:
EBD says some odd things about this. Robin says that they should agree to let Flora and Fiona stay with them as Jo might be called up to do war work otherwise, which is crazy - a woman with three babies certainly wouldn't have been expected to leave them.

There was, I believe far better provision for child care than there has been before or since. All the same, it is unlikely in a rural area. We don't see Madge and Joey being involved in the WI, or even the WRVS, but that isn't to say they weren't.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 14 May 2017, 14:35 
Offline
Learning the difference - can and may
Learning the difference - can and may
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2006, 13:28
Posts: 803
Location: SE England
My aunt was an ARP warden on top of her day job, which was working for the Coal Board. She was slim and dark, and my mother says she looked very smart and attractive in the ARP uniform, which was dark blue 'blouse' type jacket and trousers. 'Trig' would perhaps be the appropriate word!

My mother says she had no young teachers during the war - or at least, they all appeared old to her. She was eleven in the summer of 1940, and her secondary education was really trashed by the war.

Quote:
Also the war seems to sound the death knell to the need for chaperones for young ladies?

I should think that must have happened in the First World War, when so many girls went into nursing or factories or other war work. Then afterwards so many middle class girls were working or going to college or university, and often living in 'rooms'. And socialising at tennis parties or dances and so on was the norm.

I can't think of any girls' fiction of the 1920s or 1930s that make a thing of chaperonage. I think Madge only went along with it in the Tyrol books because the Austrian parents expected it. I can't imagine she'd have been bothered if they'd still lived in Taverton. Who would have done all this chaperoning, anyway? Not every family had a Tant Luise.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 15 May 2017, 06:49 
Offline
Exams...
Exams...
User avatar

Joined: 20 Jan 2004, 12:16
Posts: 343
Location: Israel
Alison H wrote:
"In December 1941, the National Service Act (no 2) made the conscription of women legal. At first, only single women aged 20-30 were called up, but by mid-1943, almost 90 per cent of single women and 80 per cent of married women were employed in essential work for the war effort." (BBC website)

I don't know what the rules were when the mum had died and an auntie or grandma or sister was responsible for a child, but surely the same exemptions must have applied - what were they meant to do if they couldn't afford boarding school?! Even once Lavender was 14, Miss Leigh would not have had to go into the Armed Forces: she'd've been found a day job near her home.

.


I dont know if in those days the "adoption" or fostering in this way would have been officialized or legalized in any way. Today, if someone is resposible for a child, it has to go through the courts, so with Miss Leigh, if it was not written down, maybe it would have been easier to call her up.

Also, maybe as a teenager, Lavendar had become more difficult to handle, so she might have wanted to get called up

_________________
I love the
CBB


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: War-related issues
PostPosted: 17 May 2017, 21:05 
Offline
Saturday Ramble
Saturday Ramble
User avatar

Joined: 30 Jan 2013, 15:57
Posts: 698
My Dad's parents met fire watching. His Dad was in the AFS and saw a lot of the Blitz, I think they went up to Manchester and Liverpool firefighting - they lived near Reading. He was medically rejected from the Army but he did a lot of war work using his carpentry skills, including building mosquitoes. Gran was a teacher.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Lemon Biscuits & Liberty Bodices
It is currently 20 Aug 2017, 12:28

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ann S and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group