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 Post subject: Re: Miss Denny's language tuition
PostPosted: 09 Oct 2017, 11:02 
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Going for a walk
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Joined: 08 Feb 2005, 15:50
Posts: 2130
Location: Cheshire
I would have assumed that, if they're using three languages, then, yes, they would have to translate between all three - otherwise, what would be the point of trying to make them trilingual?

Referring to the dementia idea. my mother spoke Irish fluently before running away to come to England in the 1930s, often used Irish words to us and still spoke in Irish to her brothers. Yet, when she developed dementia, it was the Irish that disappeared and she only spoke English - and very little even of that as she got worse.

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 Post subject: Re: Miss Denny's language tuition
PostPosted: 10 Oct 2017, 07:46 
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Attending the Fifth Form Evening
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Joined: 29 Aug 2004, 21:55
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Location: Jerusalem, Israel
When I (briefly) worked in the post-surgery recovery room, there was a big sign in the middle of the room with the most commen phrases we would hear or need to ask translated and transliterated into the four most commen languages we would hear (Hebrew, English, Russian and Arabic). The assumption was that no one in a semi-concious state, and probably in some degree of pain as the anesthesia began to wear off would be able to speak a second language, and we had to be able to communicate, at least on some level, in their language.

The next most commen options were French and Yiddish, and there was normally at least one person on each shift who had basic competancy in them - at least enough to ask how they felt and if they needed painkillers. Beyond that, we normally had to stick to signlanguage, and judging physical reactions. Most people were only there for a few hours or up to a day before they moved to a regular ward, so there was never much need for in-depth communications.

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