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 Post subject: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 28 Nov 2017, 19:48 
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Inspired by the Joey & Co thread in Special Sixth I was wondering just how many long lost relatives there are in the CS series. Off the top of my head I can think of:

The Richardsons and the Rosomon
Samantha van dear Byl and Samaria Davies
Margot, Daisy and Primula Venables and Jem Russell


I’m sure there must be more but can’t think of them right now, could anyone add to the list?


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 28 Nov 2017, 19:53 
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Adrienne Desmoines and Robin Humphries.
Nina Rutherford and the Emburys

And although they weren't exactly 'lost', Marie von Eschenau turns up with two sets of relations you wouldn't expect - not only Thekla von Stift, but she turns out to be related to the Balbinis.


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 28 Nov 2017, 20:02 
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Jeanne le Cadoulec and Melanie Lucas

Margot and Jem, fair enough, because we'd already been told that Jem had a sister, and it was just that they'd lost touch, but the others all have no idea that their relative even exists until a connection arises via the CS!

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 28 Nov 2017, 21:31 
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I think there is a distant connection between Katharine Gordon and Mary-Kate Gordon, doesn't someone find out that the fathers are distant cousins.

Not unknown long lost, but Hilda seems to have lost contact with her cousin Edgar Mordaunt until his niece Althea turns up with Peggy and Co


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 29 Nov 2017, 22:06 
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Yet Madge and Joey have loads of cousins - the "large families" of their two aunts, mentioned in the very first chapter of the series - and not one of them ever goes to the Chalet School, or turns up anywhere else in CS-land. Maybe there was a big falling out? Or the Bettanys didn't want them meeting their new friends in case they revealed some deep dark family scandal :lol: ? Or, more likely, EBD just forgot about them.

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 30 Nov 2017, 00:20 
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Alison H wrote:
Yet Madge and Joey have loads of cousins - the "large families" of their two aunts, mentioned in the very first chapter of the series - and not one of them ever goes to the Chalet School, or turns up anywhere else in CS-land. Maybe there was a big falling out? Or the Bettanys didn't want them meeting their new friends in case they revealed some deep dark family scandal :lol: ? Or, more likely, EBD just forgot about them.


Perhaps the "large families" were all boys hence none at CS - or more probably more of Madge and Dick's age than Joey's so left school or teenagers not wanting to change schools. Once Madge and Joey were in Austria and Dick in India, guess they just lost touch. Though it does seem more likely that as Alison says EBD just forgot about them!


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 04:18 
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And which of the long lost relatives finding one another was the most unrealistic?

For me, it was the two Sams. To think two girls are related simply because their names are similar is mad.

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 17:33 
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But to the young children who were reading it, there was no madness involved. Such a coincidence would have been very exciting to them! And, indeed, to you, if you read it when you were young. You wouldn't have picked it apart as a child of 9+, and that's who she was writing for.

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 19:50 
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I do remember two girls in junior school claiming they were related because they were both called Deborah. I told them they weren't but they decided to ignore annoying, know it all me. :D

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2017, 20:01 
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Family history research suggests names do run in families - they do in mine, definitely. Assuming both Samaris and Samantha were still sufficiently unusual names in the 1950s, I think it's possible that the girls themselves would have never met anyone with a name so similar to theirs before...

The odd bit for me (and this is stretching my memory - it's awhile simce I read this one :D ) is that while Samantha is a cosmopolitan, well travelled, affluent American, Samaris comes across as a lower middle class, rather parochial british girl. That contrast seems odd. Presumably Samaris's family are affluent enough to afford the CS, and Samantha's might be self made...


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 00:14 
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MaryR wrote:
But to the young children who were reading it, there was no madness involved.


Unfortunately I did not read the later books from Feud onwards until adulthood and my cynical side had kicked in! I literally chucked the book across the room at the sheer silliness of the storyline.

I think there was also a sense of disappointment with Sams, Althea and Prefects because I ordered them online, paid the extra postage, waited eagerly for them. Then I read them and ... :banghead:

Maybe I need to hand them to a young girl and ask her what she thinks.

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 00:40 
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Caroline wrote:
Family history research suggests names do run in families - they do in mine, definitely. Assuming both Samaris and Samantha were still sufficiently unusual names in the 1950s, I think it's possible that the girls themselves would have never met anyone with a name so similar to theirs before...

The odd bit for me (and this is stretching my memory - it's awhile simce I read this one :D ) is that while Samantha is a cosmopolitan, well travelled, affluent American, Samaris comes across as a lower middle class, rather parochial british girl. That contrast seems odd. Presumably Samaris's family are affluent enough to afford the CS, and Samantha's might be self made...


In one of Chalet books for girls there is a short story with sisters - twins I think - called Samaris and Samantha. Can't remember anything about it except that I thinkit's historical rather than present day


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 10:34 
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Caroline wrote:
Family history research suggests names do run in families - they do in mine, definitely. Assuming both Samaris and Samantha were still sufficiently unusual names in the 1950s, I think it's possible that the girls themselves would have never met anyone with a name so similar to theirs before...

The odd bit for me (and this is stretching my memory - it's awhile simce I read this one :D ) is that while Samantha is a cosmopolitan, well travelled, affluent American, Samaris comes across as a lower middle class, rather parochial british girl. That contrast seems odd. Presumably Samaris's family are affluent enough to afford the CS, and Samantha's might be self made...


I'm stretching my memory too, but didn't the first Samaris run away from home to get married and travel to Australia before the family returned to the UK after WWI. (or have I got this completely wrong)?

What if she married somebody who her parents disapproved, possibly because of a class difference? Or it could be simply that the disruption between the wars resulted in people moving between the working and middle classes? If they did move to Australia, class doesn't really exist there in the same way as it did in the UK at that time.

It's also possible that Samantha's father created his family's money rather than inheriting it, and so they aren't comparable with the working/middle class structure in the UK.


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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 21:28 
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Samaris' father had what was probably a well-paid job as the representative of a British engineering company in Austria.

However, Samaris has been brought up to work hard at school as she knows that she will have to earn her own living in the future. She is also very firm about her family not being able to afford extravagances as they are not rich.

She works hard as she knows that her parents have to economise to be able to pay her school fees.

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 Post subject: Re: Long lost relatives
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2017, 21:40 
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Quote:
Their great-grandmothers had been twins, born in New York in 1870. Unlike many twins, they were not in the least like each other. Samantha, the elder, had grown up into a quiet, biddable girl, fair like her great-granddaughter, and law-abiding in the extreme. Samaris, on the contrary, had always been “agin’ the government”. She and her twin had quarrelled continually from baby days, and when at the age of seventeen Samaris had fallen in love with a young Englishman who was working in the American branch of an English publisher’s office and who had nothing but his salary, the elder girl had done her best to persuade her twin to give him up. Samaris had insisted on becoming engaged to him, despite her parents’ refusal to hear of such a thing, and finally the twins quarrelled so bitterly that they had refused to speak to each other for some weeks.


Quote:
That was the last any of them had seen of her. Next morning, Samaris was gone, bag and baggage. That goodbye had been for all time. All they could hear of her was that she and her lover had slipped off, first to Canada and thence to Australia, where he had obtained a post with a similar firm to his old one. They had been married early in the morning of their elopement and Samaris, writing home, had informed her family that unless and until they forgave not only her but her husband, they would hear no more from her.
“Your great-great-grandfather was furious,” Mr van der Byl informed the enthralled girls. “He vowed he would never forgive either Samaris or her husband. All her belongings were packed up and sent off to the Australian address


Samaris's grandfather then came over to Britain during the First World War, as part of the ANZAC forces, met his future wife, who was a British nurse, and stayed.

So it sounds as if they were a well-to-do, Gilded Age New York family, and it was all about class and money.

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