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 Post subject: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 16:29 
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Discovering ink blots in your Latin prep
Discovering ink blots in your Latin prep

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This may have been discussed before, but I can''t remember if so.
Following from Alison's (?) post in another thread, about the phrase 'my sainted aunt' being unfamiliar, I wondered if this was worth opening out. My father has always used that particular phrase, so it's familiar to me - but how about 'my one and only Aunt Sophronia'? or 'Pigs may whistle but they've poor mouths for it'? These are both strange to me, what about you? And which other exclamations are maybe either regional or archaic?


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 16:41 
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Yes, that was me :lol: :lol: : I got quite excited when Audrey Roberts said "my sainted aunt" in Coronation Street last night, and also when a tennis commentator (forgotten who it was now!) said that the umpire had "a hard row to hoe" when dealing with Roger Federer's strop during the Indian Wells final.

"All serene, old peach," is one I've definitely never heard used, but the girls in Princess are using that to wind the staff up, so it's clearly meant to sound completely OTT. Some of the others are very 1920s/1930s but still in use - the cat's pyjamas, the cat's whiskers, the cat's mother (was everyone in the inter-war period obsessed with cats?!).

"Wise in her generation" sounds old-fashioned to me. I just tried Google, which informs me that it was the title of a book published in 1890, about a woman who turned down a marriage proposal - surely not something a CS girl would ever do, unless it was from poor old James H Kettlewell!

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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 17:56 
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For many years, I've wondered about the phrase EBD uses to Simone and Grizel, spoken by Jo which is "its your time to eat white bread" I think or something very similar. It's apparently Italian?

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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 19:17 
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White bread would have been more expensive so poor people woud have eaten a much coarser bread made with brown/unrefined flour. So it means their life was now happier


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 19:58 
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That phrase always makes me think of the episode in Heidi when she "steals" the white bread rolls when she is living with Clara's rich family, to save them up for Peter's blind grandmother. They are found, rock-hard, in her wardrobe and taken away from her.

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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 30 Mar 2018, 07:28 
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Anybody read the Alexander McCall Smith novels about Isobel Dalhousie? In the earlier ones she somtimes talks about her 'sainted American mother" obvously a throw-back to "sainted aunt".


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 30 Mar 2018, 08:58 
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Audrey25 wrote:
Anybody read the Alexander McCall Smith novels about Isobel Dalhousie? In the earlier ones she somtimes talks about her 'sainted American mother" obvously a throw-back to "sainted aunt".
That reminded me of Aunt Myra in Louisa M Alcott's Eight Cousins talking about her deceased daughter ("my sainted Caroline") - though it sounds as if the McCall Smith character is being ironic, if not sarcastic.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 07 Apr 2018, 17:52 
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I think it was in the earlier novels that Isobel Dalhousie spoke about her mother as "sainted". If I remember correctly she thought a lot of her mother.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 07 Apr 2018, 18:05 
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Thanks, Audrey - perhaps I'm too used to authors being ironic, if not sarcastic...


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 08 Apr 2018, 00:56 
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Noreen wrote:
Thanks, Audrey - perhaps I'm too used to authors being ironic, if not sarcastic...


Most of the time they are!


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 08 Apr 2018, 01:14 
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Audrey25 wrote:
Noreen wrote:
Thanks, Audrey - perhaps I'm too used to authors being ironic, if not sarcastic...


Most of the time they are!


Sarcastic? Never!


...I'll see myself out...

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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 08 Apr 2018, 15:07 
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Isabel did think highly of her mother, especially as she died young from cancer, but had to reassess her views when she learned that her mother had had an affair.

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A certain edge when she spoke of Mrs Maynard, certainly, but, after all, not everyone could love Joey.
'Life,' said Marvin, 'don't talk to me about life!'


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 08 Apr 2018, 17:21 
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Ooooooh. I must have missed that or forgotten about it. Years since I read the earlier books.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 20 Apr 2018, 18:01 
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I'm sure Roald Dahl used that expression in one of his books, or something like it.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 20 Apr 2018, 20:50 
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A few of the expressions used by Joey:
Blatherskites!
Fit as the Irishman’s flea
Hunkydory
Put that on your/ her needles and knit it!
and my favourite, Great Caesar’s bathmat!


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 09 Jul 2018, 20:39 
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I have heard Irish people say as fit as a flea. It's in Maeve Binchy's books as well.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 09 Jul 2018, 20:46 
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Just looked up hunky dory - don't suppose EBD knew the Japanese possible derivation!
...............
hunky-dory (adj.)
1866, American English (popularized c. 1870 by a Christy Minstrel song), perhaps an elaboration of hunkey "all right, satisfactory" (1861), from hunk "in a safe position" (1847) New York City slang used in street games, from Dutch honk "post, station, home," in children's play, "base, goal," from Middle Dutch honc "place of refuge, hiding place." A theory from 1876, however, traces it to Honcho dori, said to be a street in Yokohama, Japan, where sailors went for diversions of the sort sailors enjoy.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 09 Jul 2018, 21:33 
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ivohenry wrote:
" A theory from 1876, however, traces it to Honcho dori, said to be a street in Yokohama, Japan, where sailors went for diversions of the sort sailors enjoy.


:D :D :D

My grandmother used the phrase "put that on your needles and knit it". She was born in 1881.


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 08 Sep 2018, 03:25 
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How about Joey’s use of hunk as an insult? (In Rescue and in Oberland). I never understood that.

Also “rubber-neck four-flusher”? I’m assuming that has an interesting history...


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 Post subject: Re: my sainted aunt
PostPosted: 08 Sep 2018, 07:28 
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That one's to do with playing poker. A flush is 5 cards of the same suit, so a four flusher is someone who only has 4 cards of the same suit but bluffs than they've got five, and it became a general insult.

I just Googled hunk (you get some interesting answers!) because both Joey and Peggy use it, and I've only ever heard it as a compliment :D . Apparently it can be a form of an old American slang word, honyock, which originally meant peasant farmer but came to mean stupid oaf. Thank you, Wikipedia :lol: .

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