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 Post subject: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 10:49 
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Rescuing a Junior from the lake
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A debate has apparently been sparked – complete with discussion on Good Morning Britain – about whether or not children should stand up when a teacher enters the room, due to a parent in Middlesbrough complaining that it’s "a regimented power trip" and an attempt at enforcing conformity. There's always one. We always had to stand up when teachers came in, and, if it was a French lesson, we all had to chorus "Bonjour Madame" (I've got no idea why it was "Madame" rather than the teacher's name :lol: ).

There’s a big fuss about this in one of the British-era books – I think it must be Bride Leads - when some of the girls from Tanswick (obviously no Proper CS girl would ever be so ill-mannered) fail to stand up when Miss Annersley walks in, and are given a lecture about how they’ve got to stand up every time any teacher, or Rosalie (hooray for Rosalie being included!) enters a classroom. Is it mentioned anywhere else? I assume it's one of those things that was so much the norm at the time that EBD wouldn’t have thought it necessary to mention it. I think it’s also mentioned that one of the girls is expected to shut the door after the teacher’s walked in, but I think our teachers did shut the doors themselves!

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 14:19 
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Certainly in the lower forms (up to Upper V?), we had a 'door monitor' whose job it was to wait for the mistress to come in, shut the door behind her and also to leap to her feet to open the door for the mistress to leave. And it would never have occurred to us not to stand up when any adult entered the room. We too had to chorus 'Bonjour Madame' in French, and also 'Salve Magistra' in Latin.


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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 14:36 
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:lol: Ooh, I'd forgotten that - the Latin teacher used to say "Salvete puellae", and we had to say "Salve Magistra".

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 18:58 
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Alison H wrote:
:lol: Ooh, I'd forgotten that - the Latin teacher used to say "Salvete puellae", and we had to say "Salve Magistra".
,

Us too, but we greeted her and she replied. At the end of the lesson it was "Valete puellae" and we replied "Vale Magistra"

Me too

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 19:08 
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Alison H wrote:
if it was a French lesson, we all had to chorus "Bonjour Madame" (I've got no idea why it was "Madame" rather than the teacher's name :lol: ).


That is correct usage in French - you might refer to Madame Dupont, but you would address her as "Madame". And of course it's rude not to say a general "Bonjour" when you enter a small shop (bakery, for instance).... and one always greets the supermarket cashier.

As for not standing up when a teacher enters the room - words fail me! We were expected to stand up when our parents entered the room (especially when we were in a comfortable chair), never mind the teachers (actually, it was more my grandmother who enforced that)..... The only time one didn't stand up was during exams when the invigilators changed over. And certainly no teacher - and no senior girl, come to that - was expected to open and close the door if there was someone else who could do it for her. We even had monitors whose job it was to wait outside the staffroom and escort the relevant member of staff to the classroom, carrying their books, as well as collecting homework on the due date and putting it in the correct pigeon-hole.


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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 20:33 
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We too opened doors for staff and prefects but no one escorted mistresses to lessons.

In the Czech Republic children still stand up as a matter of course, and greet you in the street as well.

I had the misfortune of having my housemistress for Latin and one day, after my dormitory had been caught attempting a midnight feast (multi-coloured toothpaste mixed together in a mug and eaten off the end of a toothbrush) she gave the whole class the sentence to translate "Be warned by me, o girls, do not play games at midnight....."

I had never suspected before that she had a sense of humour!

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 13:17 
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We used to stand up when the headmaster came into a room in high school, but I think the practice got discontinued at some point. This was in the mid-90s.

I never had to stand up for my parents.


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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 15:17 
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We used to stand up when the teacher arrived for lesson, or when another teacher walked in. If I recall correctly the teachers at my school did not have their own classroom and pupils arrived in the classroom before the teacher did. Nowadays teachers mostly have their own rooms and are ready and waiting for the class to arrive, this is certainly the case for me.

I would find it very irritating if the class stopped working and stood up every time a member of staff walked into my room, particularly if I was in full flow or the class were doing an assessment.

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2020, 13:47 
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My sister has her class stand every morning and greet her when she arrives. She says some of the parents moan, but the children generally enjoy the routine of it. She teaches at a very large primary school in Edinburgh; at last count there were over 50 different languages spoken. Even Joey couldn't have learned all of those.


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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 11 Feb 2020, 18:25 
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I always expected my junior classes to stand when I entered in the morning, and to remain standing in the afternoon after I had collected them from the playground. That went on from 1969- 2008, so different times, but same procedure. It did them no harm, and no parents ever complained in the schools I worked in. And the Heads in all those schools expected the classes to stand when he/she entered the room.

And all that went on to even greater lengths in my own junior and secondary schooling up to 1965 - one had to stand at all times when any teacher entered the room, whether it disrupted the teacher and our work or not. And believe me, nuns were even worse sticklers than ordinary teachers!! :roll:

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 12 Feb 2020, 02:43 
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Clearly I am a member of the Great Unwashed (or the Sixties generation) because I've never encountered this custom in the States. As a teacher, I feel vindicated these days if my students look up from their phones when I enter the room...


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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 12 Feb 2020, 19:31 
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We used to do it - I remember when we were told to on our first day, because in primary I think the teacher was there before us and we didn't do it. The secretary came in at some point and we all stood up and she told us not to do it for her.

I don't think any class has ever done it for me!


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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 22 Feb 2020, 11:22 
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At my state primary school this never happened - we'd stand behind our desks and say good morning to the teacher at the start of the day I think, but that was about it.

At my private secondary school we were expected to stand up every time a member of staff/visitor/prefect came into the room. I remember thinking this was very odd when I first started at that school, but I ended up quite liking it!

This was 2000-2015 ish, so I'm sure there are plenty of places where it still happens. I like it as a custom, but I'm not so sure that it not happening is a sign of disrespect exactly.

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 Post subject: Re: Standing up for teachers
PostPosted: 16 Mar 2020, 13:34 
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I can't remember what happened at my state primary school when a teacher entered, but doubt it was anything very formal because traditional school practices like standing up were generally deeply unfashionable in the 1980s and 90s. Think the tables were always arranged in a circle rather than desks facing the teacher (believe the latter is back in fashion nowadays). I'm no expert, but think circles are better BTW.

At boarding school, I don't remember ever standing up for teachers (think the desk pattern was mostly circles, with maybe one or two traditional arrangements but not sure). Before my time, the school had apparently been a lot stricter and more regimented, but though I do forget some things, could really not imagine having to stand up in my time there.

I don't particularly like the idea of the standing thing at all (too militaristic IMO), but can understand doing it for a teacher or visitor. I think having to stand for a prefect is absurdly pompous in the modern world though. It probably made more sense in EBD's day, when society was more respectful of authority. Incidentally, some primary schools have a large team of prefects. I'm not against prefects per se but think it's ridiculous to have such a system at that age as well.

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